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pagemaker mathtype / export all equations..is it possible

Jul 7, 2011 1:05 AM

i have pagemaker doc with mathtype ole equations. Is it possible to export it to eps in batch? i need it for indesign.

 

thanks

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 7, 2011 3:11 AM   in reply to Kajza

    You can open the pagemaker document in Indesign. What will happen with the mathtype OLE equations is anyones guess.

    Jay

     
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    Jul 7, 2011 4:20 AM   in reply to Kajza

    It's been too many years now, but I remember that PM had no special features for composing math equations. When I had to write equations, I did it in Word using its Equation Editor, and copied and pasted them in PM. Results were adequate for my needs, but as I moved to newer versions of Word (and later Office), I had no way to modify existing equations. If I remember correctly, equations in PM finally ended by becoming unusable.

     
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    Apr 10, 2012 8:27 AM   in reply to Kajza

    Eps files are images. I don't see why you expect mathtype or any other program to edit text or equations in an image.

     
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    Apr 10, 2012 11:22 AM   in reply to Claudio González

    Eps files can contain vector information, including text (as well as raster images). I haven't used math type so I don't know if it can edit the eps files it outputs.

     

    I do a minimal amount of equation work in Indesign, and will ocasionally do some of the more complex equations in Illustrator. Not an ideal soultion but one that works in a pinch. I have had good luck opeining eps files embeded in Indesign in Illustrator. (after unembedding them) but your results may vary

    Jay

     
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    Apr 10, 2012 11:51 AM   in reply to Kajza

    So the problem is that the Mathtype imports into PM were done using OLE/paste special?

     

    With MathType you can insert equations as EPS images into InDesign. Using EPS images will allow InDesign to display the equations nicely no matter what form of output you choose.

    InDesign is a desktop publishing application produced by Adobe.

    With MathType and InDesign, you can:

    • Add an equation to InDesign. You can save MathType equations as EPS images that you can place in your InDesign document. You can also copy & paste equations and expressions from MathType directly into InDesign.
    • Edit an equation in InDesign. If you use the Place command in InDesign, a link to the equation is saved in the document. If you open the original EPS in MathType for editing, after you have finished your changes, closing the window will update the equation in InDesign.

    from Mathtype's website: http://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathtype/works_with.htm?target=indes ign

     
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    Apr 10, 2012 4:26 PM   in reply to Kajza

    OLE was a dead duck from the start.  PM only did it to get Windows accreditation, and any serious PM user avoided it, preferring to place an EPS or other robust file format. OLE played havoc with the PDF creation process.

     

    Your best bet IMHO is to recreate the original equations in Mathtype, save them and then place them into InD.  In fact I don't see any other option if the file conversion from PM to InD renders the OLE Mathtype file uneditable.

     
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    Apr 10, 2012 5:18 PM   in reply to Kajza

    I don't know of any way to open the PageMaker document in InDesign that will preserve the MathType equations in any form other than a low-resolution bitmap that cannot be edited. If PageMaker had the capability to save as RTF, that would probably be the answer, but it doesn't.

     

    ...you can only open 10 equations at time etc...

    Not sure exactly what you mean by this. Where does the "10" come from?

     

    So you can only write equation by equation, save each in separate file, link it to indesign...very primitive for 21 century.

    Perhaps you're talking here about the process of going from PageMaker to InDesign. That certainly isn't the case when placing a Word document with MathType equations into InDesign. If you mean the process of working directly in InDesign while creating a new document, how else would you insert equations except one by one?

     
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    Apr 11, 2012 2:52 AM   in reply to Kajza

    1. This is not a question for Adobe.

    2. This is a feature request for InDesign, not PageMaker. You can post it here:


    http://forums.adobe.com/community/indesign/indesign_feature_requests

     
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    Apr 11, 2012 4:34 AM   in reply to Kajza

    Kajza wrote:

     

    1. why mathtype cant convert all native word 2007 equation to mathtype equation? I have several situation that mt convert only some equation, not all.

    2. why you dont have on your site some scripts for placing and formating (baseline...) your equation in indesign, like script called "place inline images"? this can help indesign users You must create better use of your programs.

     

    1. As far as we know, MathType does a good job of converting Word 2007 (i.e., "OMML") equations into MathType equations. If you have a document where the equations do not fully convert, please send it to support@dessci.com and let us help you with it.
    2. For now, there are other sources for really good scripts that integrate MathType equations into InDesign. Better integration with InDesign is something we hope to incorporate into a later version of MathType.

     

    Like Claudio said, this really isn't the place for either of these discussions. Let's continue this discussion elsewhere -- like by emailing Design Science tech support and/or posting on the Adobe InDesign Forum.

     
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