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Recommened VIDEO CARD for Adobe Premiere Pro

Nov 8, 2011 8:43 AM

What VIDEO CARD do you guys recommened for Adobe Premiere Pro, I'm having some problems and I believe it's the Video Card...

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 8, 2011 8:52 AM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    nVidia GTX 560+

     
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    Nov 8, 2011 9:22 AM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    If I were to buy a card right now, this would be at the top of my list.

     

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130662

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 8, 2011 4:44 PM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    There is an approved list on the Adobe website, but many people buy a different nvidia card, and then do a hack on the system.

     

    Look more through this forum, you will find a website that will help you choose.

     

    D

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 8, 2011 6:46 PM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    What do you have now?  Rarely is the video card the problem.  I personally am going to wait for the next generation GTX 6xx series to be introduced within the next 1-3 months before I spend any more money on GPU's

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 8, 2011 6:52 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    I'm using an Nvidia GTX 570 as my primary card.

     

    I just added an Nvidia GT210, which I hope to be able to output to a 3rd monitor.Not sure that will work.

     

    The 570 is the sweet spot. Very powerful, and can be had in the $325 range if not less. Remember, a series 6 card may not be compatible with Adobe.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 9, 2011 8:27 AM   in reply to Darren Kelly
     
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    Nov 10, 2011 6:28 PM   in reply to John T Smith

    I just fnished my install today, and I can tell you my combinations of cards are just what the doctor ordered. I have MPE using the GTX570, and I have a 3rd monitor on the GT210.

     

    Looks just fine to me.

     

    D

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 6:36 AM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    Harm - are you currently using the 560? Assuming so, would you please provide more information since that card hasn't made the approved Adobe list...yet?  Please describe your card. Is it a nVidia reference card vs. EVGA, XFX, etc. OCed?  1GB, 2GB?  Are you running it in SLI with a 2nd 560? If not in SLI with the 560, do you have any experience with previous SLI configurations? The reason I ask is some versions don’t seem to work as expected as the configuration changes. Did you have to “hack” it as Darren Kelly suggested getting it to run?  Have you had any problems with the Mercury playback?  Thank you, in advance, for the info.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 6:49 AM   in reply to PLKetron2

    If you go to Benchmark Results you can see that I have a single Point-of-View brand nVidia GTX 480 video card.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 6:59 AM   in reply to PLKetron2

    If you are selecting a video card - more precisely an unapproved Nvidia card - the manufacturer of the card doesn't seem to matter - you have to do the Hack. All the hack does is change a few lines of text in one file to add your non approved card to the list.

     

    The card still must meet certain requirements. It must be a CUDA capable card. It must have more tha 1GB of DDR5 RAM on it. You should run the latest graphics drivers from Nvidia, etc. If you decide to save a little money, and buy the 560 over the 570, you have to remember that Adobe will not supply tech support if you call in.

     

    Hope this helps

     

    DBK

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 7:07 AM   in reply to Darren Kelly

    Actually, the Nvidia card must have 896MB or more RAM. Preferably 1GB or more.

     

    As for Adobe not supplying technical support when the OP calls in regarding a non-Adobe-certified GPU, they will not supply such support other than the canned response "With that card Premiere Pro should be run only in MPE software-only mode".

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 8:02 AM   in reply to RjL190365

    Yes, you need a card with 896MB available for the CUDA processing. In order to achieve that, you have to buy a 1GB card. The balance of the 1GB is used for the general GUI.

     

    If I had the money, I would have purchased a card with 2 or more, as I think it would help with the bottleneck that is associated with using larger PSD files.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 9:50 AM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    Harm - to clarify your recommendation, you are saying select a nVidia video card above 560, as in either the GTX 570/580? Or any nVidia card above 560?

     

    Darren - your information on the cuda, 1GB, etc. is why I visit the forums.  Rhetorical question, why doesn't Adobe put that requirement in their requirements rather thana card list?  Their list most likely, will always lag behind the video card introduction. Especially when you consider that the 570/580 were released almos a year ago.  Note: as far as the 560 vs. 570, its not about price, in every review I have seen the 560 is 25-30% faster, meaning that the 570 isn't taking advantage of its 30% more transistors.  What is the file name I need to modify? and which line of "code"?

     

    Thank you for the feedback hope it helps ALMedcalf6 too.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 23, 2011 10:01 AM   in reply to PLKetron2

    http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/PremiereCS5.htm

     

     

    This is the link to the article and Hack program you can use.

     

    As to why Adobe doesn't just say X number of cores..... They have posted in many parts of these forums that they test the video cards they recommend, and can't make a blanket recommendation based on a cards stats. You might email Adobe's employees who monitor this forum, and others. I just know when I was making the selection about 3 months ago, they were sticking with their list of cards. As the article points out, this company has tested many more cards and can attest to them working. Weather the 560 does out perform the 570 or not, I don't know. I just bought the 570 as it seemed like the best bang for the buck that was on the list that I could source. It gave me the ability to call Adobe for Technical support, which I wanted as I was switching from Mac platforms, which I was more comfortable with to a PC edit system.

     

    Hope this helps

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2011 9:54 AM   in reply to Darren Kelly

    I'm not really clear on how the memory of the GPU comes into play (1GB vs 2GB).  Would it be better to get a 2GB GTX 550 Ti or a 1GB GTX 560 Ti?  Or would a 1GB GTX 550 Ti achieve similar results?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2011 11:02 AM   in reply to Jack Banatoni

    Ideally, you want the 560 with 2GB.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2011 11:41 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    If money were no object. I get an EVGA Nvidia GTX 580 with 3GB of on board RAM.

     

    http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130655. It's about $580.00

     

    http://www.vuugo.com/en/Nvidia/EVGA-GeForce-GTX-560-Ti-NVIDIA-2GB-256- bit-DDR5-PCI-E-20-16x-Video-Card/02G-P3-1568-KR.aspx

     

    This is the 560 with 2GB or RAM, it's about $260.00

     

    What do you get for the additional $300? You get the fastest single processor video cardd with lots of memory. You also get compatibility with Adobe's list of approved cards.

     

    I keep wondering with all the people using the hacks, what happens if Adobe closes that door. I understand after upgrading from 5.5 to 5.5.1 and then to 5.5.2, you have to reapply the hack, but what happens if they literally closed the door. People will have a lot of video cards that will not use the MPE.

     

    It's just a thought, I don't know anything, so just take it as a thought.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2011 6:11 PM   in reply to Darren Kelly

    I keep wondering with all the people using the hacks, what happens if Adobe closes that door. I understand after upgrading from 5.5 to 5.5.1 and then to 5.5.2, you have to reapply the hack, but what happens if they literally closed the door. People will have a lot of video cards that will not use the MPE.

    That includes newer cards. If Adobe were to have closed that door, the list of supported GPUs would have been restricted to very expensive and older-model Quadros. Anybody with cheaper-than-$1,000 cards and/or newer-than-last-gen GPUs would have been permanently locked to the MPE software-only mode.

     

    The only way to keep a lot of users satisfied and at the same time eliminate the hackers would be for the next CS (CS6) to fully support OpenCL in its MPE GPU accelerated mode. This would allow most if not all Nvidia and ATi/AMD GPUs to use MPE GPU mode. However, such added support comes at a cost of even more software bloat and possibly higher prices for the CS6 suite. Plus, Adobe has announced that it is abandoning the three-version upgrade policy in favor of a one-version upgrade. This means that anybody trying to upgrade CS4 or earlier to CS6 must either upgrade to CS5 or CS5.5 first and then to CS6 in order to get the upgrade price (as the upgrade pricing for CS6 will be restricted to registered users of CS5 or CS5.5). Users trying to upgrade directly from CS4 or earlier to CS6 will be charged the full, non-upgrade price.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 7:17 AM   in reply to RjL190365

    THe point is, that Nvidia had developed the CUDA environment, and Adobe designed for it because it provided the resources required.

     

    I'm not sure if ATI's technology works the same way. I'd rather look at this a little differently.

     

    In 1994, I purchased my first NLE. It was a Fast Video Machine. THe board set to have just 2 layers in realtimewas over $12,000.00. In addition, you needed atleast 2 SCSI drives. I bought 2X2GB because that cost me $7,000.00. That's GB guys. So to get realtime, I had spent $19,000.00 plus purchased a computer. A workstation class machine back then was about $7,000. So for about $26K, I had one monitor, plus a video out monitor. I used that system until the late 90's when I bought a Matrox card for around $5,000.00

     

    Get the picture.

     

    It's about 10 times cheaper to build a multilayer editing system, where you can have 3-4 monitors, have as many as 10 layers in real-time. Being asked to buy one of a select number of a single videop card to get 10X more ability is not much to ask.

     

    Back in the same time in 1994 people where throwing $30K at software and hardware bundles from AVID and Media 100 - plus the drives (purchased from AVID or Media 100 at huge prices) and others. You could spend $100K for those 2 layer realtime systems.

     

    Go buy one of the listed cards. If you work professionally you will get your investment back in days. We use to laugh because both Avid and Media 100 would always have a testimonial in their demo reels that said "I got my investment from purchasing a Media 100 in just the first Job" We loved that. They made all of us laugh in the NAB trade booth.

     

    Now all you have to do is build a decent work station, and buy a car in the mid $300 range to do all that and more.

     

    Signed

     

    Grampa

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 9:48 AM   in reply to Darren Kelly

    Here's the problem:

     

    I am not a paid professional at all (as far as video is concerned). I am just a casual video shooter who is simply frustrated with the limitations of every single one of the $100 consumer video editing programs (for example, many of those programs do not properly support progressive source video at frame rates above 30 fps (in which case every other frame gets dropped at the editing timeline no matter what) or do not properly support progressive source video at all at any frame rate (in which case the video gets interlaced at the timeline even if one does not want that to happen - and often using a bad-quality alogarithm) - and such mangling of the video at the timeline shows up in a painful manner in the finished product). Under those circumstances, I am forced to use a "prosumer" program.

     

    With that said, although my main rig has one of the listed cards, it does not mean that a given future version of Premiere Pro will even support a currently listed card at all for the MPE GPU accelerated mode. In fact, given the history with some other NLEs, older cards that were previously listed are now no longer supported in GPU mode. Eventually, those older cards will no longer be supported even in software-only mode.

     

    By the way, the GTX 480 has never been officially listed on the Adobe supported cards list even though its lesser GTX 470 sibling currently is listed.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 12:56 PM   in reply to RjL190365

    Well RJL 19th of March, 1965 -( just a guess)

     

    I don't know what to tell you. You can use Premiere Elements, which is a pretty complete subset of Premiere, and over this holiday weekend seems to be available under $100.00. I don't know if it is CUDA based or not, but people do work on it and it has a good reputation. I've taught it, and like Photoshop Elements, I like them.

     

    If I had a dollar for everytime someone said the editing system I was using was prosumer, or not professional, I would be a wealthy man."It's a poor artist that blames his tools" - not sure who made that famous.

     

    OK, so your system is not capable of shooting and editing in 1080p. Here are a few facts about our old friend 1080p. Unless you are watching a blu Ray video that was shot, edited, and mastered to Blu ray in 1080p, you are not watching 1080p. All the cable and satellite broadcasters in North America only broadcast in 720p. Now, before I get hate mail, check it out folks.

     

    You need a professional, broadcast grade monitor to see the differences between 720p, 1080i, and yes even 1080p. I had one once. It was an Ikegami and it cost just over $27,000.00. Wow did pictures on that look great. Funny enough, at the time I was shooting with the first "affordable" HD camera from JVC. We used this monitor to compare footage from that single chip camera with an FW900. There was a difference, but not enough to say drop everything.

     

    I've been in this industry since the early 70's when we shot in black and white. A hand held camera weighed about 30lbs, had no shoulder mount, but instead a contraption that rested on your shoulder with the assistance of a flag pole type device to help you steady things. So, I'm about 3 years from saying 40 years. I've had years with sales over $1 million, and I've weathered 3 or more recessions, where one year I had sales of less than $100K. Not a good time.

     

    The tools I've used have ranged from what people said were prosumer, but I could show them that "prosumer"footage on broadcast television. I've also seen way too much high quality stuff - RED included shot poorly, and look worse than the GoPro camera I use for extreme shooting.

     

    You do the best with the gear you can afford. If you can't edit in 1080p, don't shoot that way. Use 720p or standard deffinition still exisits. It's the telling of the story that's important. You do it with the tools you have, and you do the best job you can do.

     

    Since you're not doing this for money, do it to make yourself happy.

     

     

    Good Luck

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 2:10 PM   in reply to Darren Kelly

    I tried it. Unfortunately, I had the exact same experience with it as I did with any other consumer program. At least with the most recent version that I used, it does not support 60p or even 50p at any resolution. Only 30p or less is supported even at 720p (and any 60i or 60p content chopped down to 30p looks horrible to my eyes). Worse, I cannot get the properly downsized (downrezzed) transcoded footage to work at all in any of those programs (at least without requiring extremely destructive recompression). The only downsizing that works at all with these cheapo programs uses completely wrong alogarithms that leave severe artifacts in the final image (with the worst being so bad that it might as well have only 15 lines total of resolution).

     

    Moreover, none of the consumer programs have a GPU-accelerated mode at all. All aspects of those programs are software-only. (I confirmed this by running GPU-Z, and discovered that the GPU utilization is stuck at zero or near-zero even with a super-expensive Quadro that I borrowed for testing.) In addition, the consumer programs are strictly 32-bit only. Thus, they cannot take full advantage of even a very old single-core Pentium 4, let alone today's high performance systems.

     

    By the way, my HD camera only shoots interlaced (1080i or 480i). Unfortunately, the consumer programs by themselves do a very poor job of downsizing interlaced footage. None of the still cameras in my possession shoot higher than VGA (640x480) - and at only 30p or 15p.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 1:17 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Lookin at the nVidia GTX 560+, I see 2 monitor DVI output and an HDMI. Does this mean 3 monitors can be setup on this one card?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 1:35 PM   in reply to 77mrd

    The GeForce cards are limited to two monitors per card, unfortunately. This limitation is in hardware.

     

    That said, if you plug something into all three ports, you might not get any image at all from any of the three ports unless you disconnect at least one of the monitors.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 3:28 PM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    After all the speculation I thought this might be appropriate to present a few facts.  Here are my results on PPBM5.5 testing on my "library" of six CUDA cards that work with Premiere CS5.5.

    GPU-test-PPBM5.5.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 4:11 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Thanks, Bill, for the CS5.5 results. This confirms that if one is stuck with a cheapo GeForce or Quadro card with fewer than 96 CUDA cores on a reasonably fast i7 system, and he is using CS5.5, he might as well permanently lock CS5.5 to the MPE software-only mode and not even bother with the "hack" at all.  Under this scenario, the 9500 GT in MPE software-only mode achieves a total time of only 435 seconds versus 1002 seconds in MPE GPU-accelerated mode. (In fact, an overclocked i7-2600K with 16GB of RAM but a really cheapo GeForce card with CS5.5 set to the MPE GPU mode is even slower overall, especially in MPEG-2 encoding, than the 990-ish second result of my stock-speed i3-2100 with only 4GB of RAM and integrated Intel HD Graphics 2000 with CS5.5 set to software-only mode.) It also shows that the best current values among the CUDA GPUs have somewhere between 300 and 500 CUDA cores (this means the GTX 560, 560 Ti or 570, of which the 570 is officially on the Adobe list).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 7:07 PM   in reply to RjL190365

    Tuesday the upgraded GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores goes on sale, that puts it in almost the 570 class.  Since the good nVidia Kepler's now look like it they could be almost a year away I may see if I can find one at a reasonable price in the next month or two.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 27, 2011 7:15 PM   in reply to RjL190365

    Then, I guess for you, you need to not worry about hardware, you need to save some money for Premiere Pro 5 or 5.5

     

    Since you are  not doing commercial work, you might look for an education priced copy of premiere. You can also look at Ebay, there are deals to be had.

     

    Good Luck

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2011 7:06 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Bill,

     

    I will be submitting my CS5.5 results of my main i7-2600K rig with the GTX 470 at stock and at either 4.4GHz or 4.5GHz. However, my results are much, much closer to that of your GTX 285 than to that of your GTX 480.

     

    EDIT: It turned out that I might need a new card and a new case in order to improve my scores with CS5.5. The particular GTX 470 I was using has an Nvidia reference cooler, and the GPU's fan speed fluctuated wildly and frequently ramped up to maximum speed during the MPEG-2 DVD test (this indicates that the GPU might have been throttling back frequently to avoid overheating). Moreover, my system has been somewhat less than totally stable with this card installed: Sometimes, I got no display while a few other times I had a 116 BSOD code just attempting to boot into Windows (although most of the BSODs occurred while I had that card running in an i7-950 system with a Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R v1.0, which was never totally stable to begin with). But my CPU (at least in the Cooler Master CM 690 II, which does not have a sufficient number of or sufficiently-sized fans for such a higher-end rig) is already running relatively warm, into the upper 70s C during Prime95 at a relatively modest overclock of 4.5GHz - and getting a new graphics card with a better but open cooler would have increased the heat inside the case (and therefore the CPU) by a fair amount. As it stands now, the 110-ish second time in the MPEG-2 DVD test is about par for a GTX 470 on an overclocked i7-2600K system, but I felt that it could have been quite a bit faster.

     

    As for the case, then yes, a bigger case with better and more numerous fans would have allowed me to overclock my CPU even further without seriously overheating. Instead of the current 4.5GHz, I might have been able to reach 4.8GHz if I had a CM HAF 932 instead of the CM 690 II.

     

    Message was edited by: RjL190365

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2011 3:11 PM   in reply to RjL190365

    Well I did it sooner than expected.  Before the end of the week I will be able to add the scores of the brand new "special edition" EVGA GTX 560 Ti 448 core GPU board to the table above.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 25, 2012 2:59 PM   in reply to Darren Kelly

    Darren Kelly wrote:

     

    I'm using an Nvidia GTX 570 as my primary card.

     

    I just added an Nvidia GT210, which I hope to be able to output to a 3rd monitor.Not sure that will work.

     

    The 570 is the sweet spot. Very powerful, and can be had in the $325 range if not less. Remember, a series 6 card may not be compatible with Adobe.

    Hi Darren,

     

    Where can i get the 570 in the $325 range?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 25, 2012 3:27 PM   in reply to mystickid
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 25, 2012 3:30 PM   in reply to mystickid

    Looks to me that Bill has a better deal than I. If you are Canadian, I bought mine at Canada Computes.

     

    Good answer Bill!

     

    DBK

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 25, 2012 6:03 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Thanks for  the tip Bill.

     

    Is there any difference between these two 570s? The one you linked to and this one here? They're both the smae specs, as it seems, but one has 53 reviews and a 4 star rating while the other has a 5 star rating and 230 reviews?

     

    I noticed the one you linked to says "Overclocked" while the latter is not.  I'm intriqued by the differences in ratings

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 25, 2012 8:55 PM   in reply to ALMedcalf6

    I am using an nVidia 550Ti.  First only use nVidia cards if you want to use the GPU acceleration, which is one of the main standouts points for PrPro for me.  Look up the number of CUDA cores on the card.  I have read that more is not necessarily better, the 550Ti has 96 I think.  There are better cards, some of which cost alot more, like the quadros.  Check out the good posts using searches for Mercury playback and GPU acceleration.  I think the minimum for acceleration is 768 MB of video ram.  Get DDR 3 or better DDR 5.  Forget DDR 2.  Good luck Jack

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 25, 2012 9:27 PM   in reply to Jack-2959

    I called adobe just to make sure, and only the cards listed on the pc requirements page support the mercury playback engine. In my budget range, I can only afford a GTX 470 or 570 (both cards are MPE supported). Ideally I want a GTX 560 because it's less expensive than the 570 and way ahead of my ATI 5570.  But the sad thing for me is that the 560 is not MPE supported; only the 470/570. Fiddlesticks!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 26, 2012 11:56 AM   in reply to mystickid

    B. S. The GTX 560 works fine! 
    All you have to do is properly add it the "cuda_supported_cards.txt" file.  Search for nVidia hack

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 26, 2012 12:10 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Here are some recent CS5.5.2 results the I have run with the PPBM5 Benchmark

     

    GPU-test-PPBM5.5-new.jpg

    Jack, Your GTX 550 is not really helping you much.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 26, 2012 1:21 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Bill Gehrke wrote:

     

    B. S. The GTX 560 works fine! 
    All you have to do is properly add it the "cuda_supported_cards.txt" file.  Search for nVidia hack

    Thank you Sir!

     
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