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New_to_Printing
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Hello all...Print questions...Help appreciated...

Dec 2, 2011 5:18 AM

Tags: #printing #indesign. #printing_problem #printable

Thanks in advance for taking the time to view this...and for the help that many of you will offer.

 

I am fairly new to commercial printing and I tried to create a small quick-start guide for a product that I am trying to have manufactured in China.  I created the product guide in Word and saved it in PDF format.  The manufacturing company, located in China, did not like the PDF version that I sent.  I created it again, in Photoshop, saved it as a PDS and a PDF and still, they complained.   I don't really have a lot of fancy stuff...just a few instructions and a few screenshots.

 

Now, they are asking for it in AI format (which I assume is Adobe Illustrator).   What is the standard for submitting a document for a print job?

 

Are there any things that I should/could do to make my documents resizable/scaleable?   I know the basics as far as working with PDF docs, Photoshop, and inDesign (although I am trying to learn more, since I like what I see so far).  I never really did much with Adobe Illustrator, but if that is what works best for printing, I guess I better learn.

 

And...since I realize you all are pros at this...do you recommend a few sites/beginner's books or intro to printing guides, where I could learn about this stuff?

 

Thanks!

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 2, 2011 8:10 AM   in reply to New_to_Printing

    NTP,

     

    and a few screenshots.

     

    This may be the reason for the complaints. Print requires much higher (final RIP) resolution than does screen viewing.

     

    With vector artwork, as in AI = Illustrator, you are not limiting the print quality. That is probably why they are asking for AI, although the request is far from foolproof: you could just File>Place a 72PPI raster image and have a useless AI document.

     

    You can work in Photoshop, as vector artwork or at an adequate resolution.

     

    In any case, you can create a PDF from the Illustrator or Photoshop document, keeping vector as vector (and raster as raster).

     

    You should either create everything as vector artwork and keep it that way, or ask the printer which resolution they require (you may have to if you use raster images).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 2, 2011 7:19 PM   in reply to New_to_Printing

    I need more information in order to be able to help you.  But, let me take a stab at it anyway...

     

    "I am fairly new to commercial printing and I tried to create a small quick-start guide for a product that I am trying to have manufactured in China.  I created the product guide in Word and saved it in PDF format.  The manufacturing company, located in China, did not like the PDF version that I sent.  I created it again, in Photoshop, saved it as a PDS and a PDF and still, they complained.   I don't really have a lot of fancy stuff...just a few instructions and a few screenshots.

     

    - Like Jacob said, your file's resolution might be what they do not like.  I'd like to know what they didn't like, but here we are, so I'll continue.  Most print documents are built to a specific size and all elements must meet certain resolution parameters.  Scalability is not typically factored in to a document.  Word is not your average document application.  It's a great word processor, but anything more than that and people start to cringe.

     

    Now, they are asking for it in AI format (which I assume is Adobe Illustrator).   What is the standard for submitting a document for a print job?

     

    - You failed to mention how many pages are in the document.  Illustrator is great for a one page file, but InDesign is usually what is used for a multi-paged document.

     

    Are there any things that I should/could do to make my documents resizable/scaleable?   I know the basics as far as working with PDF docs, Photoshop, and inDesign (although I am trying to learn more, since I like what I see so far).  I never really did much with Adobe Illustrator, but if that is what works best for printing, I guess I better learn.

     

    - Again, each document should be built to size and typically is not scaled due to resolution issues.  Illustrator is a good tool, so learning it is a good idea.  That and InDesign.

     

    And...since I realize you all are pros at this...do you recommend a few sites/beginner's books or intro to printing guides, where I could learn about this stuff?"

     

    - Scout your local library or bookstore for Adobe's "Classroom in a Book" series.  And, stay away from "WOW!" books, just look for something witten by an industry expert and comes with a CD ( source files ).  Also, take a look at non-credit or credit courses in Desktop Publishing at a local college.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2012 3:46 AM   in reply to New_to_Printing

    Hello! I'm from a printing company called PrintPlace and we deal with these type of concerns all the time. Here is our FAQ page http://www.printplace.com/support/HCBase/faq.aspx. Here's another one from about.com: http://desktoppub.about.com/od/prepresstechnique/Prepress_Tutorials_Pr eflight_File_Preparation.htm. Good luck!

     
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