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New site rankings

Feb 3, 2012 10:22 AM

I am about to upload a new site to replace my existing site. Essentially an upgrade.

 

Will this affect my rankings in the search engines and do I have to re-submit my site to the search engines?

 

Will it take long for my site to be found by the main search engines?

 

Is there any advice I should follow to make the transition a smoothy one?

 

Thanks to all who have helped me get to this stage. Keep up the good work.

 

Michael

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 3, 2012 12:34 PM   in reply to MichaelCo

    Will this affect my rankings in the search engines and do I have to re-submit my site to the search engines?

     

    As long as search engines were spidering your site before as deemed by the robots.txt file, they should continue to spider your site.  As far as the rankings it all depends on the site and the code.  If it's just a new theme, then don't expect any change.  If you added new content or removed content, you can expect changes, but I wouldn't expect anything too drastic.

     

    Will it take long for my site to be found by the main search engines?

    See above answer, it's pretty much the same.

     

    Is there any advice I should follow to make the transition a smoothy one?

     

    If you are elimintaing any content be sure to set up redirects to new content or at minimum your home page.  Don't let users or search engines end up on error pages.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 7, 2012 10:35 AM   in reply to MichaelCo

    Since no-one here is likely to have a definitive answer, try asking this on a dedicated search engine forum where these issues are discussed full-time

     

    e.g. http://forums.searchenginewatch.com/

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 7, 2012 11:02 AM   in reply to MichaelCo

    Michael, with regards to your questions I don't think anyone can have a definitive answer because the calculations change all the time and while it is good to invest time into SEO you don't want to overinvest and forget about usability as that is ALWAYS more important.

     

    Back to your 2/5 response:

     

    As long as search engines were spidering your site before as deemed by the robots.txt file  - lost me there, how do I know?

     

    You should be signed up for tools for tracking these types of things from basic analytics to something like the Google Webmaster Tools which tells you about this.  If your site is on Google right now then it is being spidered.  How often is determined by page rank and how often Google sees the content being updated.  If Google feels the content is stale on the page or not updated often it will spider it less than say the homepage of CNN or the New York Times which is constantly updated.  It's like comparing an article to the homepage of the news site's themselves. 

     

    I am hoping to do away with the old site and replace it with a completely new one

     

    This is a mistake.  Unless your core business has drastically changed you should try to keep some things in tact such as key product pages, company information pages, etc., etc.  Also to add to this post:

     

    I am going to delete complete remote site in a FTP window and then upload my new site to the same (now empty) window.

     

    That is an expansion of the above mistake.  You need to set up a redirect while you do this so visitors are not turned away.  Can you really risk your website being down for an extended period of time to re-upload a new site, setup database(s), etc.?  In your case I'd move your entire site into a subfolder and run it from there while you implement the new design.  It doesn't make any business sense to shut everything down.

     

    On this new site, I am hoping to use as many  meta tags  and as much description as I did on the old site.

     

    This is really outdated too.  Back in 2009 Google stopped reading most meta tags because they were being spammed by online marketers who tried to get irrelevant traffic to their site (Google help documentation - http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=79812 ).  Google also mentioned in January that they are going to scan where keywords are on a page and the higher up they are the higher the Google rank ( http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/01/page-layout-algorit hm-improvement.html ).

     

    As I eluded to in the beginning of my post, do not make the mistake of getting too caught up with the SEO of your site if you are doing this large of a refresh.  Remember why you did this refresh and focus on your core business strengths.  If you are worried about the content coming up for SEO you should be hiring a writer to help you with better content not just spamming keywords because you are think you are relevant when you have no content to offer.  If your business sinks or swims with SEO, hire a marketer to give you new ideas for expanding your business.  Go out and become part of professional organizations that can give you quality link backs and networking opportunities.

     

    Lastly, if you do go to other sources or even look for help here, posting your website address is the best way.  Then people can critically look at your site and give you constructive criticism about how updates will affect your site.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 7, 2012 12:53 PM   in reply to MichaelCo

    OK, I just revised an entire website. Re-designed it completely. I've changed some of the ways I work in Dreamweaver and have started using HTML5 and CSS3. Client wanted a new look. Client was envious of some of the new websites I was putting together. Client is also my wife, so she gets my undivided attention.

     

    Her business was pretty much #1 in local Google searches. Here is why:

     

    The website was search-engine optimized: I made sure important concepts were in h1, h2 and h3 tags throughout the website. I also did not use meta tags. I made sure the title was reflective of the actual page. New content was added to the site (see below).

     

    The website is search-engine marketed: My wife worked well with social media. She has a blog, she's active on Twitter and Facebook, with a business Twitter account and a business Facebook page. All get regular updates and she doesn't spam with them—she uses them to attract customers with positive content she thinks will interest them. She writes articles on her blog that are readable.

     

    She has also been writing articles that have been published in magazines, both locally and nationwide. We have echoed those articles, only some of which are on the Internet on her website in an Articles section. This added content keeps people going to her website and keeps the search engines checking to see what's new.

     

    My wife has a strong commitment to use Google's AdWords and has two ad campaigns continuously running to keep business coming in. The website has landing pages that allow us to see what's happening using the stats application on the server as well as a targeted message on those pages to help close.

     

    We relaunched the website in early January with completely new graphics, but much the same content, just organized in a different way. Navigation is simpler, it's easier to find stuff on her website.

     

    She is still #1 on the search engine rankings in her local area and surrounding areas are beginning to show her ranking higher as well. Google's webmaster tools say that she is getting an average of 30 hits daily, up from 15 for the old website.

     

    Here are the differences:

     

    • I have learned a few tricks and may have further optimized content.
    • Since the pages are now HTML5, the tags on the website are more semantic. It is posisble Google is increasing the rankings of a website in HTML5 if the semantic coding structure of HTML5's built-in tags and selectors are seen as improving accessibility.
    • There are fewer subdirectories because we reorganized content, so the website is "flatter" with more pages accessible one subdirectory down, instead of two and sometimes three. I don't know if this matters to a web crawler, but a long path name might be detrimental.

     

    My advise is to not over-think this. Do your best work. Do the redesign. Do the relaunch.

     

    -Mark

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2013 5:01 PM   in reply to mhollis55

    I admire your commen

    t "Client was envious of some of the new websites I was putting together. Client is also my wife, so she gets my undivided attention."

    Kudo's to a Great Husband! ^5

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 22, 2013 7:00 PM   in reply to SnakEyez02

    I am hoping to do away with the old site and replace it with a completely new one

     

    This is a mistake.  Unless your core business has drastically changed you should try to keep some things in tact such as key product pages, company information pages, etc., etc.  Also to add to this post:

     

    I agree with keeping things intact but I "rebuilt" my brother's site three times since 2009 keeping head info (metadata and keywords) intact from the previous build but new menus, and almost completelty re-written content... and the result was a climb in  local page rankings shortly after the new build went up... each time. Except for the yellow Google ads and two "big wigs" (one sponsored by County government), the site is the third one that appears in a search for "Bee Removal Tucson AZ". #2 with Bing. Yahoo seems to sort alphabetically regardless so I don't know about them, but site stats show most searches that land on the site came from Google anyway, so that's who I target.

    I guess my experience is as long as you keep the baby, go ahead and throw out the bathwater once in a while.

     
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