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What are the best export settings for a HD video in Premier Pro CS4?

Feb 9, 2012 5:58 PM

Tags: #cs4 #file #size #pro #premiere #exporting

Hi!

   I've been having so much trouble with this issue and it's something that continually frustrates my boss. I have a HD video the settings for it are

FPS 23.98

1920 x 1080, then a few lines down it says 1408 x 792

16 bit,

2 channels

48000 Hz

   What should the settings be when I make a new sequence?

             When I look at it in the window in Premiere Pro I have to contantly 'shrink' the image to fit the window, is that something I should be doing or does it indicate the sequence settings are incorrect?

 

But more importantly what should the export settings be? I exported a 4 minute long video and the size was 1 GB, I know that's too big.

I need to export it without loosing any quality and export another one that meets the Youtube and Vimeo limits on size.

Vimeo is 500 MB per week, sometimes I upload 4 videos per week. I think Youtube you can only upload 500 MB at a time.

I need to get smaller sizes with loosing the least amount of quality possible AND the best export settings for quality, so I guess I have 3 separate questions-

What are the best sequence settings for HD video?

What are the best export settings for HD without loosing any quality?

What are the best export settings for the size to come out around 500 MB with loosing the least amount of quality possible?

Thank You!

 

 

http://forums.adobe.com/thread/713070

 

On the above thread I used the 5th anwer, and it's going to take about 7 hours to export a 4 minute video :/

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2012 7:21 PM   in reply to sensory_overflow

    First, what codec?

     

    Read Bill Hunt on a file type as WRAPPER http://forums.adobe.com/thread/440037

    What is a CODEC... a Primer http://forums.adobe.com/thread/546811

    What CODEC is INSIDE that file? http://forums.adobe.com/thread/440037

    .

    Report back with the codec details of your file, use the programs below... a screen shot works well to SHOW people what you are doing

    .

    For PC http://www.headbands.com/gspot/ or http://mediainfo.sourceforge.net/en

    For Mac http://mediainfo.massanti.com/

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2012 8:21 PM   in reply to sensory_overflow
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 24, 2013 5:32 PM   in reply to sensory_overflow

    I have scoured the internet trying to find the best settings when considering quality and size. I used to use H.264 for quite a long time. Just yesterday though I switched to QuickTime believe it or not.

     

    Here is the exporting guide I wrote with all the settings and screens shots of video comparisons after being uploaded to YouTube.

     

    http://goo.gl/8GZq4i

     

    Hope this helps!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 24, 2013 7:00 PM   in reply to sensory_overflow

    >sad to say I still don't know what codec it is

     

    What is a CODEC... a Primer http://forums.adobe.com/thread/546811

    What CODEC is INSIDE that file? http://forums.adobe.com/thread/440037

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 24, 2013 7:26 PM   in reply to sensory_overflow

    It Stands for "Coder Decoder."

     

    Your format is like a container for your video file. Certain containers can hold certain codecs and not others. Other containers can hold other codecs. Sometimes different containers can hold the same codecs.

     

    This might be a bad analogy but I'll give it a try.

     

    A coffe cup (container) can hold pretty much any liquid you drink, where a red solo cup (container) won't hold scolding water. So, the coffe cup would be your container of choice most likely because it has the most options for liquids (codecs). But, you might want a red solo cup for just a single crappy beer at a party (a moderate quality streaming video on the web). In that case, you don't need all the optoins of another container.

     

    In Premiere Pro CC H.264 is a Container and the Codec in one option. This has been streamlined for web distrobution of video to be played in browsers without things like Flash or special players.

     

    Were as if you choose the QuickTime Container there are over 40 codec optoins (at least on my machine with additinal ones installed) but you may run into an issue where your browser doesn't support QuickTime playback.

     

    I would say that your container is for compatability with players and your codec is taken into consideration when looking at the quality of the compression.

     

    Yesteraday I wrote a blog entery on Exporting from Premiere Pro and found that the MPEG-4 codec inside of the QuickTime container gave me much richer colors than the H.264 container/codec option.

     

    I posted the link before but here it is:

     

    http://goo.gl/8GZq4i

     
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