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nighttimenellie
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getting the best quality

Feb 29, 2012 9:38 AM

Hi all ,first post so if its all been covered before sorry,loads of questions but first my camcorder is a panny nv-gs400 dv, i capture on ulead and edit in adobe elements 3(for some reason cant capture with adobe just says device is offline)first question is on the camera what are the best settings on the panny for spotlight recording, i take it manual settings must be better than just hitting the scene button for spotlight.

second ,once i have done all the editing what is the best way to export the footage to dvd for highest quality(i have tried to read about 2 passes and codecs etc but dont realy understand)i need a step by step guide if at all possible as i am worse than useless with computers, all the best Nellie

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 10:21 AM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    MiniDV is the easiest format to edit because the video data just streams into the computer unchanged and as is. So no matter which program you use to capture it, you still get the original video data created by the camcorder.

     

    If your project is set up for DV video, you need only use Share/Disc/DVD to output the best possible quality DVD. Your output should be virtually identical to your original footage.

     
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    Feb 29, 2012 10:45 AM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    If you have underexposed lighting conditions, you are likely seeing video noise, introduced as the sensor in the camera struggles with low illumination levels.

     

    While not in PrE, I use Neat Video, which can be run as a plug-in Effect, or as a stand-alone program. It takes some experimentation, but is quite good. After you establish the best settings, you might want to apply a bit of Unsharpe Mask shapening, AFTER Neat Video. Also note: Render and Export times do go up, as Neat Video is a pretty intensive Effect.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Feb 29, 2012 1:05 PM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    >where is

     

    User Guide PDF http://help.adobe.com/en_US/premiereelements/using/index.html

    Right click the PDF link in the upper right corner and select to save to your hard drive

    -the page also has links to help pages for previous versions

     
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    Feb 29, 2012 1:32 PM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    In my experiences, it does. However, do not be impatient, as it does take some tweaking to get the best results. One can use the "examination function," and that will get one close, but with but a little more work, things get better still.

     

    One thing that I like to do is to set the WAB (Work Area Bar) to be over just the Clip, to which I am applying Neat Video, and when things look good, Render just that portion, under the WAB, then study the Program Monitor at 100% (from Fit). This does take some time to do the Renders, and then to study the results, but one will benefit, with the ulitmate results. Remember to then apply a little bit of Sharpening (think that PrE has Unsharp Mask, but that might only be in PrPro?). Just a bit, goes a long way.

     

    I have saved many clients' old, underexposed VHS footage, with some work in Neat Image, and then a bit of Sharpening.

     

    Note: If you have some Clips, where the video noise is pretty consistant and commone to each Clip, then, without adding any other Effects, use Neat Image on one such Clip, experimenting, until it is where you want it. Add that bit of Sharpening. Next, Rt-click that first Clip (with Neat Image & the Sharpening), and choose Copy. Then, Select all of the other Clips in the Timeline, that need that same treatment. Rt-click those, and choose Paste Attributes. The Neat Image Effect, with your tested settings, plus the Shapening, will then be applied to all of those. You might need to go in and tweak, the Clips, but you will have a good "starting point." That can save a lot of time and work.

     

    Good luck, and do try out the trial on some of your problem footage. Do not recall if the trial was watermarked, limited in some way, or only limited regarding the time of allowed usage. I did the trial, many versions ago, then bought the full-tilt version. BTW - I had used the companion program, Neat Image in Photoshop, so already had a little background, and experience with that program.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 4, 2012 2:49 PM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    So long as you can capture the HD output you should see an improved image but this won't be identical to real HD. Real HD has all its pixels exactly defined. Upscaled footage relies on the upscaling engine to add additional pixels.

     

    But upscaling hardware is improving all the time. I was always pleased with my 2008 Panasonic upscaling DVD-R, but now it looks crude when compared to DVD's played with my 2011 upscaling Blu-ray player.

     

    Cheers,

    --

    Neale

    Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

     
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    Mar 4, 2012 6:37 PM   in reply to nealeh

    As Neale says,you really can't create pixels where they don't exist, so even if you could create a 1920x1080 video from a 720x480 video source, it wouldn't really be more detailed -- any more than stretching a small T-shirt to fit a large person would actually make larger shirt.

     
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    Mar 5, 2012 6:56 AM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    No. Your DVD player is not adding detail to your video. It's just doubling up the pixels to make your DVD look more like a BluRay.

     

    The video is still only 720x480.

     

    As Bill says, there is software that will approximate adding more pixels --- but it's impossible to create pixels and detail where none exists.

     
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    Mar 7, 2012 1:20 PM   in reply to nighttimenellie

    If you will ever do full-HD 1920 x 1080, then the "Pro" version would be worth the difference. If you will ONLY be doing SD, then the "Home" version should be adequate.

     

    As for being able to toggle between a Clip w/ and w/o Effects during playback, the answer is no. As a matter of fact, for most accurate playback, it would probably be best to toggle off an Effect, and then Render the Clip - same for when you apply an Effect.

     

    As for why the Audio is missing from the VIDEO_TS file, I have no clue. The last step, prior to organizing the VIDEO_TS and its files, the Audio & Video Streams are muxed into a single MPEG-2 file, which can span several VOB's. When you playback the VIDEO_TS folder in a DVD software player, do you get the Audio there, prior to using ImgBurn for the physical burn?

     

    Some DVD players have issues with RW discs. That is why I only use those for testing, and never for delivery. All of my DVD/BD players have no issues with RW discs, but some do.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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