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savispud
Currently Being Moderated

adjusting image saturation

Mar 10, 2012 1:21 PM

Dear All,

discovered the pleasures of Edit>Convert to Profile command. When I convert to a new profile (I have belatedly  discovered paper profiles) from adobe RGB to Hahnelmule Photorag to be precise there is a loss of saturation I am having trouble recovering. I will avoid this problem by starting with the correct profile however I have a lot of work in the wrong profile. To keep things simple I have flattened the image. Suggestions?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 2:30 PM   in reply to savispud


    >> Edit>Convert to Profile command. When I convert to a new profile...there is a loss of saturation I am having trouble recovering


    that is a sure sign your Source Space has "out of gamut" color in your print space that will need to be addressed in every file, sorry, i don't know many tips for this

     

    as you mentioned important, before converting (Edit> Convert to Profile) always flatten any adjustment layers

     

    try this: gballard.net/psd/cmstheory.html

    starting with: SOFT PROOFING in Photoshop (1/3 down the page)

    OUT-OF-GAMUT COLORS and

    Rendering Intent: Perceptual v Relative Colorimetric

     

    Bruce Fraser was the King of this area:

    http://www.creativepro.com/articles/author/127446

    his theories are still very much relevant today

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 2:35 PM   in reply to savispud

    You're no doubt going to get some questions on why you're converting images from a device independent profile to a paper-specific profile.  Perhaps that would be a good place to start.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 3:47 PM   in reply to savispud

    Not sure what a "mains place" is - print house?  It's amazing that in this day and age that a print shop wouldn't know about color profiles.

     

    It's hard to envision a loss of detail because of a profile conversion, though...  Can you put up before/after screenshots?  I'm wondering if something is wrong with the profile on hearing that.  VERY curious.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2012 6:35 PM   in reply to savispud

    This going to be another thread where the OP is starting from nowhere. You DO NOT convert your source space to a paper profile. Get the printer profiles from Hahnemule for your printer.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 12:34 PM   in reply to savispud


    >> I was recomended to use Convert to Profile by the print bureau.


    i think the undercurrent here is the source>print Conversion should be applied in the printer setup — not in Photoshop — although, as long as the conversion is done as a final last step in packaging the file for the printer (and that's what the printer requested), i don't see a problem as long as you keep the editable working copy preserved in its wider-gamut form

     

    • PS: it could be the printer wants you to do the Conversion so you can see the gamut problems with your file, and he doesn't have to explain why your out-of-gamut colors shifted and blocked up because YOU did the conversion and he only printed YOUR file

     

    in other words, as you probably know, don't convert your master file to the small print profile, hammer away on it, and Save over it...much better to work on a copy of the master file in Adjustment Layers, and do the conversion as a last step before saving a copy of that for the printer

     

    if i was developing a workflow to deal with these issues, i would read everything Bruce Fraser wrote about Photoshop Gamut, Gamut Warning, Soft Proofing, 16-bit capturing and editing in Adjustment Layers (until i fully understood what he was talking about)

     

    next i would go to View> Proof Setup> Custom and set Device to Simulate to the printer profile (so i could exploit Photoshop's Gamut Warning & Soft Proofing tools)

     

    then when the prints come back, train my eye to interpret the differences and work better from the start based on what is being observed in the problem (and good) areas

     

    of course, this is assuming that all three of your profiles are excellent for 'accurate' proofing on the monitor: source, monitor, and print spaces

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2012 1:12 PM   in reply to gator soup

    Start using a different printer. Why should you do their work.

     
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