Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Out of memory error in Illustrator CS5

Apr 13, 2012 3:25 AM

Giving me 'insufficient memory was available to complete the operation' when trying to place and image (jpg ~23mb) inside a .ai file which is just a few KB large.

 

Laptop has 6GB physical RAM and 1GB virtual RAM.

 

Any ideas how to get around it?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 13, 2012 7:04 AM   in reply to ramzam82

    Hello ramzam,

     

    If the JPG file is 23 megs on disk, then uncompressed it is going to be 75 megs or so uncompressed. Still, that doesn't seem too large.

     

    Load it into PS or another image editor and save it as a TIFF and then try placing the TIFF.

     

    Take care, Mike

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 13, 2012 7:43 AM   in reply to MW Design

    Hi Ramzam

     

    Could you please describe me 2 things?

     

    What´s the dimension in pixels of the image? And the color mode?

     

    Thank you a lot

    Gustavo.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 18, 2012 2:32 PM   in reply to ramzam82

    I'm having the identical problem.  It's the first time I've used Adobe Illustrator CS5, v. 15.0.2 on a new PC.  I'm only trying to place an 18MB jpg on a previous ai file after deleting a different jpg from that file.  But, "insufficient memory was available to complete the operation." My PC has 250 GB free on the main hard drive, 16GB RAM, and is 64bit, Win7.  It's not the hardware that's the limiting factor.  Any solutions?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 18, 2012 3:05 PM   in reply to Geoski

    Try to first resave the AI file overwriting the original after deleting the original image. This will clear the stored preview of the image and may free up enough space to re-place another image.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 18, 2012 9:32 PM   in reply to Geoski

    The limiting factor is AI's memory management. And file size on disk doesn't mean anything. An 18 or 22 MB JPEG can easily expand to 2GB uncompressed and then you already break AI's measly 2GB limit. no way around it.

     

    Mylenium

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 19, 2012 7:18 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    Closing AI completely (and also rebooting) temporarily gets around the issue.  But what's the permanent solution?  Is there a preferences setting to give it more memory?  Is there a way to permanently compress a jpeg so it doesn't blow up inside AI?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 20, 2012 12:50 AM   in reply to Geoski

    It can't be done. AI is a 32bit app and can only address 2.something GB overall memory. The only way to reduce memory usage is to downsize the image. nobody can work with invisible pixels. It's simple computational mathemtatics.

     

    Mylenium

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2012 8:40 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    I'm coming late to this issue, but my impression is that this is only the tip of the iceberg.  I've been experiencing multiple errors with my three Adobe products since moving from Win 7 to Win 8 (I did this so I could report to my clients -- the report is "don't do it!").

     

    All three products (CS5 for 32 bits, CS4 for whatever CS5 won't handle in a 32 bit system, and Acrobat XI) have worked in perfect harmony for a number of weeks.  When I moved to Win 8, I encountered a number of situations.

     

    The first was the one in this thread.  I would work on an image in PS5 and run out of memory when I tried to save it as a JPEG.  My guess was that the problem was not really in the saving, but in Adobe's method of conversion at the time of saving.  If I saved with the standard baseline, there'd be no problem; but if I saved with an "optimized" baseline, the insufficient memory message would appear.  Apparently, Adobe was trying to do too many operations at one time for the computer to handle.

     

    This is the result of poor programming.  Resource management is a priority when working with images, even moreso when we have moving images.  But I've seen no problem in my Premier4 application, so whoever coded that program knew what they were doing.  The first thing that needs to be done when working with intense memory-draining situations is to parse the operations to fit the amount of available working memory (RAM + fileswap - other resources in use).  In other words, fit the work assignments to the available working space.

     

    Why did this become an issue after I migrated to Win 8?

     

    My guess is that it was because I installed Win 8 over Win 7 and that Adobe neither checked for changes in memory allotment, nor did it make any allowances.  So the kind of distribution of workloads that allowed Adobe to be successful in Win 7 did not work in Win 8.

     

    Another failure of the company!

     

    These issues raise their head on a regular basis -- I noticed the problem go all the way back to Win XP (and maybe even Win 98).  All Adobe products should be designed to confirm their working environment at each boot-up; and if there is a change, then there needs to be a reaching out to the company's servers and an update that tells the products how to accomodate to that change.

     

    I said there were multiple problems.  The rest of these are all in the same category:  permissions.

     

    When I try to use the print>Adobe PDF method of converting a page in IE10 to PDF, it stops with the message that it does not have permission to access the folder in which I am trying to place it (I use folders outside the Windows "Documents" structure).  These folders are sometimes in other partitions, sometimes in external drives.  It makes no difference:  I am not allowed to save there.

     

    This is a problem perculiar to the circumstances.  For example, if I use the Adobe add-on to make the conversion, there is no problem -- I can save it anywhere.  Only if I use the print-through-Adobe-PDF option in IE.  It does not cause problems in Firefox.  It does not cause problems in MS Office 2010.  It does not cause problems in almost any other situation.  But it does in the Internet Explorer container.

     

    I said "almost" anywhere else.  I do get the same issue when I try to save a modified JPEG in Photoshop5 to my other partitions: Photoshop Saving to D Problem.JPG

     

    And, again, I've read about this issue with earlier versions of Windows, so it doesn't seem to be a Win 8 issue, but rather an Adobe issue that arises when the product is carried through a migration to Win 8 from Win 7 (and perhaps from XP to Win 7 or Vista), instead of being installed in a fresh OS.

     

    Hope the data is useful.

     

    Michael

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 2, 2013 11:47 PM   in reply to ramzam82

    Illustrator some time display, does not have enough memory to display your page, insufficient memory, in fact you do not indeed a bigger memory and disk space.

     

    Do it as I do. Go to Preferences > Plug-ins & Scratch Disks, in the Scratch Disks  is set to one of your local disk, select another disk as secondary disk.

    2013-05-03_1156.png

    Restart illustrator. You will never face "not have enough memory" dialog.....Cool isn't it. 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 8, 2013 7:00 AM   in reply to ranjitmuk

    Hi

     

      We have one user in the company that is having the out of memory issue but with CS6. We have reinstalled on fresh OS and reinstalled everything. So my question are the following?

     

    #1 is this a jpgeg issue, being to large

    #2 Is the a jpgeg issue being in a different location (possiably on the network, which I know is a gray zone)

    #3 is it an cs6 installation/setting issue?

     

    Let me know if you need a log file

     

    Thank you

    Michael

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points