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Need help with intricate lettering

Apr 13, 2012 1:17 PM

BMW Cert logo1.jpg

 

Well, I try not to ask questions on this forum without attempting things myself. I understand other people's time very important. Anyway, I took a course at a technical college and have a home classroom course that I'm doing right now. Unfortunately, at this point I need help. This logo must be recreated to vector art because it will be printed on a very large substrate. The customer has no access to the vector art.

 

I need help.....I am very proficient with the basic tools, the pen tool especially. However, creating intricate lettering like this, I don't have much experience with.

 

The lettering is kicking my *** right now. Also, I can mimic the gradient for the bars decently, but am having trouble with the little rounded gradient effect in the corners.

 

I hate to beg for help, but may I have help!!?? I'm not looking for someone to do the work, rather please provide any tips so I can wade my way through this. The customer contacted my boss today and needs it by Monday for a meeting, so I will have a project to do over the weekend.

 

It needs to print spot black. Any tips/suggestions will be greatly appreciated. After work tonight, I'm going to go through my classroom in a book to pick up helpful tips.

 

Thanks everyone,

 

Andrew

 
Replies
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    Apr 13, 2012 2:02 PM   in reply to ajrunke03
     
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    Apr 13, 2012 3:13 PM   in reply to ajrunke03

    I would crdo this in photoshop, and use  layer effects >> bevel & emboss there.

     

    Untitled-2.jpg

     
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    Apr 13, 2012 3:21 PM   in reply to ajrunke03

    I did this in Illustrator by simply mapping the gradient to the front surface of the letters in the 3D Extrude and Bevel effect.

     

    Screen Shot 2012-04-13 at 6.17.42 PM.png

     
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    Apr 13, 2012 7:12 PM   in reply to ajrunke03

    There are many stylistic variations of this kind of thing. Your screenshot is too low-res to discern the exact treatment used for sure. That said:

     

    This takes about 5 minutes and results in a clean, economical construct with a minimum of paths.

    Only color is Spot Black.

    Two Swatches: Spot Black and 20% tint of Spot Black.

    All the offset paths (the inner paths of all the characters) are a single Compound Path and receive a three-stop linear grad fill at 0 degrees.

    All the original paths (the outer paths of all the characters) are left separate and a three-stop linear grad fill at 120 degrees is applied (so each outer character has its own grad that can be individually adjusted).

     

     

    A little individual adjustment of the grads on each outer character can very closely match the arrangement of bevel tones of the original you're trying to emulate. Keep it simple. Study the shading of the emboss edges carefully, and try to see them as linear grads spanning the whole character, not as a bunch of tiny tedious individual details wrapping around the character. Then accomplish the shading with as few grad stops as possible. Understand how to "tighten" or "sharpen" the shifts between grad stops by moving the gamma pointers that are between each pair of adjacent grad stop off-center toward one stop or the other. The tighter the transitions--especially on the bevel facets--the more "sparkle."

     

    JET

     
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