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CS6 Feature: Legacy preferences, Machine-specific preferences

Apr 18, 2012 10:10 AM

I wanted to touch briefly on some new functionality in Audition CS6 that many of our users may enjoy. 

 

LEGACY PREFERENCE IMPORT


Audition CS6 supports importing preferences, keyboard shortcuts, favorites, effect presets, and metadata display settings from an existing installation of Audition CS5.5.  Some of you may remember a function in Cool Edit Pro and early versions of Audition whereby you could drag-and-drop an old settings file onto Audition and it would import the preferences.  This "secret" feature remained but went largely unsupported in later releases of Audition, and was not re-implemented for CS5.5. 

 

CS6 removes the need to discover arcane secrets and hidden files, and simply asks permission to import legacy prefs on first launch if it detects and existing installation of Audition CS5.5.

Screen shot 2012-04-18 at 9.44.52 AM.png

(Note: The dire warning about never having another opportunity to import is a bit of bluster.  If you hit cancel or decide later that you'd like to import the legacy preferences, you can delete your existing CS6 preference directory and launch Audition to be prompted once again.)

 

 

MACHINE-SPECIFIC PREFERENCES

 

A brand new feature for CS6, and one that came directly from user requests, enables IT admins to configure shared systems on managed networks to override roaming user hardware settings with appropriate settings for each machine.  Historically, Audition saves the last used hardware device in the user preferences.  Typically, these will be local and only used by the machine in question, but for users in some larger environments, their Windows user profiles are roaming which means they can logon to any computer on the network and their application settings data will follow them.  This works great when a user wants their preferred desktop layout or effect presets wherever they work, but starts to introduce problems when the last system they used had an RME audio interface, but the workstation they just logged into has an M-Audio FastTrack, for example.  Audition can't find the RME device and prompts the user to reconfigure which for many users might as well be a pop quiz on quantum mechanics.

 

Now, administrators setting up a shared machine may install a pre-defined hardware configuration on a per-machine basis and override any existing user preferences.  Savvy users may ignore the pre-defined configuration or change their device as before, if necessary.  This bit of trickery is accomplished in a very simple manner: The Audio Hardware, Audio Channel Mapping, and Control Surface preferences have been broken out into a separate file, MachineSpecificSettings.xml.  When an admin has properly configured an installation of Audition on a new workstation, they can locate this file in the default user preferences folder and copy it to a shared location:

       Mac OS X: /Library/Preferences/Adobe/Audition/5.0/

       Windows 7/XP (32-bit): /Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Audition/5.0/

       Windows 7/XP (64-bit):  /Program Files (x86)/Common Files/Adobe/Audition/5.0/

This feature is enabled by default, but if Audition does not find the global preference file, it falls back to the user preference.

 

Screen shot 2012-04-18 at 9.58.40 AM.png


 

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