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Gifs export slow no matter the frame rate

Apr 24, 2012 11:30 AM

Tags: #cs5 #macbook #mac #.gif #save_for_web

Hi,

 

I have Photoshop CS5 Extended, running on Mac OS X Snow Leopard. I use photoshop to make gifs, either from video frames > layers or from importing screenshots into a stack. When I make the gifs, I set the frame delay in the animation panel to whatever I want - mostly 0.04, 0.06 and 0.1 and when I play it, it works exactly how I want it to, running at the speed set.

 

But when I go to Save for Web and Devices, the preview of the gif is slow and doesn't play at the same rate as what I set. No matter what I do to the frame rate - set it to no delay, convert it to a timeline gif, the gif doesn't run faster in the Save for Web window. When I upload it to a website, again the gif plays at the same slow rate shown in the Save for Web window.

 

This problem doesn't happen when I import a video to layers and set it to skip every two frames (or more). But even if I make a gif with very few frames (either from importing from a video with no skipping or from importing screenshots), it still runs very slow.

 

Other friends who make gifs via the same method as I do don't encounter this problem. I even opened a .psd from a friend of a gif with a frame rate of 0.06 and when I went to Save for Web, it still played very slow but for my friend, they managed to export the gif and have it play at the intended speed in their photoshop (also CS5).

 

So how can I make the change the setting for the frame rate in Save for Web and Devices because I assume it must be an issue within that panel?

 

Thanks so much.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 24, 2012 11:45 AM   in reply to offtotheraces

    The GIF animation settings in Photoshop are only guidelines. Actual playback speed will depend on the distinct hardware/software of each user. Those that choose to create animations with such a fast framerate (0.04 second delay) are often misusing the GIF format when they should really use a video format.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 24, 2012 1:41 PM   in reply to offtotheraces

    offtotheraces wrote:

     

    Okay, but I have really good hardware specs...

    That means nothing if the GIF is poorly designed/optimized. GIF is simply not a format that was intended to render great changes between frames.

     

    Would you care to share what you are producing?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 24, 2012 2:26 PM   in reply to offtotheraces

    offtotheraces wrote:

     

    Here is what I'm making...

    I don't understand. What exactly have you made?

     

    Neither one of those files plays consistently.  Watch and observe as they loop.

     

    Had I fully realized that you were abusing the GIF format to convert video, I would not have wasted our time here. I'm sorry to have taken up your time.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:22 PM   in reply to offtotheraces

    If you are opening a video file and saving GIF, you are converting video.

     

    [Personal attacks removed]

     

    If your friends were successful, ask them to tell you how they did it.

     

    [Removed personal, inaccurate insults]

     

    Message was edited by: sinious

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 24, 2012 7:36 PM   in reply to offtotheraces

    Sorry, but you are completely missing Marian's points. This is by no means a Photoshop problem. All you files play smooth as butter on my system - that is 3.5 year old core7i. If they don't on your end, then there's something wrong with your "rendering device" a.k.a. your browser and its drawing refresh. Anyway, as Marian already pointed out, there is no way to enforce anything. The possible playback performance is completely dependent on on how it is interpreted and handled by the browser plus some issues like the number of colors in the palette, which dithering methods are used and even the frame duration may figure in, but again, it's completely out of your control. Sure, there is some problem somewhere in your case, but Photoshop? I think that's unlikely. It's more likely that you have misconfigured your browser or some other stuff is running (browser plug-ins, JavaScript) that eat up all performance and casue refresh delays in teh browser window....

     

    Mylenium

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 17, 2013 5:44 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    Marian, are you serious? "Abusing the gif format"?

     

    Converting video to gif is extremely popular and has a legitimate use. If you want to display an instantly playing, looping section of a specific piece of video to illustrate a point or to reference a quote from TV or film, I can't think of better format to use.

     

    I think the question "how old are you," would be better asked of yourself. It is no longer wasteful to display 1mb+ animated gifs on webpages thanks to broadband speeds. 10 years ago I would have agreed with you, not now. The use of such animated gifs has exploded over the last few years and I personally think they are a valuble contribution to the Internet. The "history or intent" of any format does not limit it's useage in new and interesting ways, a cursory look at the history of any media will tell you that.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:18 PM   in reply to spellingmistakes

    This topic is almost 1 year old, and Marian is no longer an active member of these forums.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:29 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    As mentioned, no video is converted here, screen captures are stacked into an animated GIF.

     

    To clear another thing up, each GIF frame is exactly like a keyframe. There is no spatinal compression thus drastic changes between frames are irrelevant. Every single pixel can change and it makes no performance difference.

     

    GIF animations are extremely useful and rampant as avatars for a multitude of uses, mostly in forums and profiles.

     

    "Save for Web" was always a plugin for Photoshop. There is no guarantee if you do not directly export from Photoshop (not use a plugin) that "Photoshop settings" will be maintained. Do not use "Save for Web" and you should get better results. Although both images (after downloaded) play at very fast framerates for me. Update your browser and video card drivers if you aren't seeing the same.

     

    No more personal attacks necessary here.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 9:13 PM   in reply to offtotheraces

    OK, I'll add to this. I too find photoshop's GIF export framerate pretty crappy. I've been trying to create a loading circle GIF, and the speed from PS just isnt right. And its not a limitation of the GIF format. The best results I have achieved are from Flash, exporting the movie as an aminated GIF. This give amazing speeds and correct framerates. Problem is, you dont get all the good compression settings that you do in PS.

     

    Here is the file exported from photoshop

    http://imgur.com/L5ZKjEz,ulZ9ssN#1

     

    Here is the file exported from Flash

    http://imgur.com/L5ZKjEz,ulZ9ssN#0

     

    As you can see, you get amazing speed from Flash, but you dont' have good color palette options...

     

    So, I think the issue is with PS, because if Flash can do it, there's no reason PS can't....

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 9:37 PM   in reply to offtotheraces

    OK, I have worked it out!

     

    To get photoshop to deliver much better framerates....

    - Select all the frames in the Timeline window

    - Right click on a frame image, and select "Do not dispose" from the dropdown.

     

    This has given me much faster results.

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 16, 2014 8:19 AM   in reply to theSchtickla

    Thanks for your extra tips.

     

    I believe the last GIF animation I made was from Fireworks. I don't even know if it still supports that editing mode but you're right that the GIF animation format supports quite a few interval changes. I never examined the actual bytes exported previously but if I told a specific frame to hold for 10 seconds the file size was identical if I did not delay it at all. Essentially that told me the format supports encoding an actual delay per frame rather than the software stacking 10 seconds worth of the same frame (which would increase file size). So you should be able to achieve any frame rate you desire, especially varying rates.

     
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