Skip navigation
tashawaddell
Currently Being Moderated

Jpeg looks different than actual Image in Photoshop (saving Issues)

Apr 30, 2012 2:56 AM

Tags: #cs4 #photoshop #jpeg #saving

My image in photoshop has thin lines, but when I save it, the jpeg shows the image with very thick dark lines, looking not like the image in photoshop. Why does it do this? How can I stop PS from doing this to my image? I want the image to look as it does in Photoshop when I save it as a Jpeg.

This is in Photoshop CS4

 

 

 

Batmobile.JPGAs it should be (using the snipping tool (I can't use the snipping tool as my only option, because it will only capture the size as it is on the screen, not the actual dimensions in Photoshop)

 

To the Batmobile.jpg

Saved as a Jpeg; the lines are thicker, and now there is little variation in line weight

 

Does anyone have a solution? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:06 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    Is the difference also there if you compare the two images as View > Actual Pixels in Photoshop?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:11 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    So when you view the layered psd at Actual Pixels it is »identical« to the jpg?

    That would mean that the difference you perceive at smaller magnifications is just a preview issue.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:27 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    Just to humour me, could you please post a screenshot of both psd and jpg at Actual Pixels? (Edit: naturally of the same section)

    And the Layers Panel for the psd?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:29 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    Another suspicion: Is the psd grayscale and the jpg RGB (maybe because created via Save for Web & Devices)?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:44 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    What color spaces are the two images?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:52 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    What profile does the image have embedded? (Edit: If none then what are your Color Settings?)

    Is it CMYK or RGB?

    How exactly do you create the jpg?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 3:55 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    RGB is a color mode, not a color space.

    The color space is usually described by an ICC-profile (one can check it under Edit > Assign Profile).

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 4:13 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    Which one of the three points is checked?

    What are your Color Settings (please just post a screenshot)?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 5:38 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    No, I can’t see the image.

     

    What bit depth are the images? (Image > Mode)

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 7:53 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    Just one comment...  Your lines in your screen grab are NOT thinner, they are simply a good bit lighter.

     

    You should try to use the proper terminology, because you will end up realizing, when C.Pfaffenbichler helps you get to the bottom of your problem, that you likely are experiencing a gamma/color-management issue causing your pixels to be displayed far more lightly in one case than another.

     

    Besides your color settings in Photoshop, it will also be helpful to know what color profile is associated with your monitor at the operating system level.

     

    -Noel

     

     

    P.S., I don't know what result you're going for, but the JPEG with the darker lines looks a lot better on a calibrated display.  The screen grab seems too light.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 7:54 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    You don't seem to have a white background layer in your Photoshop document. This could make a big difference. When creating  line art on a transparent layer you should always have a white background layer at the bottom.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 10:06 PM   in reply to emil emil

    Another land of the lost thread.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 10:09 PM   in reply to Lundberg02

    What do you mean?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2012 10:37 PM   in reply to emil emil

    I mean that before the ill fated Photoshop 5, you could pretty much just use it, now you have to grasp the concepts.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 1, 2012 3:24 AM   in reply to tashawaddell

    Compliments to emil emil.

     

    tashawaddell, have you set Photoshop’s Transparency Settings to display white instead of the default checkerboard pattern?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 1, 2012 4:55 AM   in reply to Lundberg02

    Yeah, nice call, Emil!

     

    Tashawaddell, do you have something different than the default checkerboard grid pattern set for the background?  This wouild be changed in Preferences - Transparency & Gamut.  Seeing a checkerboard showing through partially transparent layers would be a giveaway for a problem like this.

     

    TransparencyAndGamut.jpg

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 1, 2012 6:44 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Apparently tashawaddell has his transparency settings set to None and his Open GL settings are set to Normal or Advanced. Then Photoshop simulates the transparency of the drawing which has a lot of semi-transparent pixels from the anti-aliasing. When the image is flatten this simulation is gone resulting in a unexpected surprise - darker image. And there is no automatic fix for this but to use the color correction tools like levels and curves or even adding an overall transparency of the layer to achieve the same look after adding an opaque layer at the bottom.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 1, 2012 10:33 AM   in reply to emil emil

    emil emil wrote:

     

    Apparently tashawaddell has his transparency settings...

    Just a wild guess, but "Tasha" might be a girl.  It's sometimes difficult but I try not to assume gender as that can seem odd to someone if one gets it wrong...

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 1, 2012 7:14 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    My apologies to tashawaddell if I my wording was wrong.

    Some of the regulars here may have noticed that I'm struggling with my ESL, I often edit my messages a lot because of that but when I'm in a rush I'm at my worst, I'm trying to improve though

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points