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RAM & CS6

May 5, 2012 2:31 AM

Hi, I'll be getting a new PC shortly and I wonder how much RAM to install. It'll have Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-core and a Intel 520 SSD 249 GB (and two 3TB HDs as well).

Usage mostly PS, LL and C1, relatively big files.

 
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  • Trevor Dennis
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    May 24, 2010
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    May 5, 2012 3:27 AM   in reply to photoarne

    At the very least, you should be thinking of 8Gb with a system like that, and 16Gb would give you nicely balanced system.  What main board are you using, and how many DIMM slots?  I went with the X79-UD5 because it has 8 slots, which let me use 32Gb of the cheaper 4Gb DDR5 sticks.  That was really with NLE in mind, but Photoshop will make good use of lots RAM.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 5, 2012 7:27 AM   in reply to photoarne

    Assuming it's DDR3 memory, go for 24 GB.  If you read carefully you often find that newer systems, by making best use of all 3 memory channels, will perform better if you install DIMMs in sets of 3.    RAM is pretty cheap nowadays, and 24 GB will give you room to grow.  Myself, if I were buying a new workstation right now, might even consider 48 GB.  In fact, I was just looking at a Dell Precision T5500 with 48 GB on eBay for a pretty good price.

     

    Also, I strongly urge you to consider ECC RAM if your system can use it.  This will both correct miscellaneous RAM errors (which do happen), and your BIOS will halt your system if an uncorrectable error occurs - rather than just let it blaze onward with corrupted data, which will likely crash your system anyway, and has a greater chance of destroying your work.  It will also clearly pinpoint a problem if you do have a RAM fault or failure, so that you can address it rather than living with instability.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 5, 2012 12:59 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    All this is presupposing you are going to have a 64-bit OS...

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 5, 2012 1:28 PM   in reply to photoarne

    By the way, look also into OCZ SSDs (e.g., the mature Vertex 3 or possibly their new Vertex 4 design).  I just built a big array from 4 Vertex 3s as drive C: and I'm very happy with the near zero latency response and 1.75 gigabyte/second throughput.

     

    What's your budget, if I may ask?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
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    May 24, 2010
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    May 5, 2012 2:41 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I did of course mean DDR3 memory in my last post.  One more point to consider is that Win 7 Home Premium is limited to 16Gb.  Professional and Ultimate will effectively address as much RAM as you can fit.  (64Gb ?)

     

    The X79-UD5 is probably not the only X79 board with 8 slots.   When I built a few months back, 8Gb sticks were way more than twice the price of 4Gb sticks).  You also said that price is not important.  I'd be inclined to head over to the Premiere Pro Hardware forum, or just Google X79 and the 3930K as I have read about issues.  The 39360K is apparently OK though.   I've not had too many problems with my rig, but I will say it is not the most stable system I've ever had.

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
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    May 5, 2012 2:44 PM   in reply to photoarne

    photoarne wrote:

     

    Cost is really not an issue, considering long time (not to mention daily) usage. As mentioned I have ordered an Intel 240 GB SSD as C disc. Are you suggesting an other and better choice?

    Btw. I've been thinking to allocate some 30-40 GB on this SSD as scratchdisc for CS6. Any thoughts?

     

    Regards

    Arne

    I would definitely go and browse (or search) the Premiere Pro hardware forum.  They'll tell you why it is not a good idea to partition drives for Scratch space, or even partition drives at all. 

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 5, 2012 2:49 PM   in reply to photoarne

    photoarne wrote:

     

    I have ordered an Intel 240 GB SSD as C disc. Are you suggesting an other and better choice?

    Btw. I've been thinking to allocate some 30-40 GB on this SSD as scratchdisc for CS6. Any thoughts?

     

    I didn't realize you'd already ordered it.  I was suggesting the OCZ brand just because they make good hardware IMO.  Is your drive based on the Sandforce controller internally?

     

    Windows loves to grow.  I've been running my Windows 7 workstation with a 2 TB C: drive since the first of 2010, and the contents of my C: drive have grown to 586 GB.  While some 200 GB of that is probably almost trivial to move to another drive, that still means that when a big Windows 7 system is allowed to install things where it wants to (generally, programs expect to be installed on C:), it can grow to fill half a terabyte.

     

    Given that observation, and that SSDs like to run best with a fair bit of free space, not long ago I built a RAID0 array of 4 x 480 GB SSD drives, so that more than 50% of the space is free.  These replaced an array of fast spinning drives, and so far it's been a major upgrade in responsiveness - and it's working reliably.

     

    You might want to consider adding a second drive in RAID0 arrangement so that you're not fighting for free space, and you can feel comfortable about using the SSD for TEMP and scratch storage.  Doing that makes sense, since SSDs are so amazingly fast.

     

    Like Trevor, I'd suggest against partitioning your SSD.  Might as well keep all the free space in one pool.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
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    May 5, 2012 11:37 PM   in reply to photoarne

    240Gb should easily hold all your program files as well as your OS, and it makes sense to keep them on the C:\ drive.  If you think space is going to be a problem, then 'My documents' is obviously going to go on one of the 3Tb drives (my goodness how HDDs evolve), but you can also relocate things Desktop.  I am a shocker for letting my Desktop get cluttered with way too much data, so that lives on my second Raid0 which has a couple of 1Tb WD Greens.  I also noticed that my Downloads folder was getting huge, so moved that off the SSD as well. 

     

    If you take a similar route, then I'd advise keeping a file with your various folders mapped out, as with lots of drives (I have ten) it can get confusing.  For instance I keep my Outlook PST file on a remote drive as it is up to 4Gb now, and at one stage I lost track of where it was, and had to spend time sorting it out.

     

    BTW Noel etc. My USB3 externals are disappearing after wake up from deep sleep, and I have to reboot to get them back.  I've had to set the Power settings to computer never goes to sleep to avoid it.  Anyone think of a better solution that lets me use sensible Power settings?  Win 7 Pro.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 6, 2012 5:27 AM   in reply to photoarne

    Something also to consider:  Get an external drive to which to do backups.  I rely on Western Digital MyBook drives, which have been very solid.

     

    Windows Backup & Restore is actually excellent, though you need to change the default settings to truly be covered for all possibilities (e.g., you need to enable System Image backup to be able to do a bare metal restoral after catastrophic failure).

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 6, 2012 5:34 AM   in reply to Trevor Dennis

    Trevor.Dennis wrote:

     


    BTW Noel etc.
    My USB3 externals are disappearing after wake up from deep sleep, and I have to reboot to get them back.  I've had to set the Power settings to computer never goes to sleep to avoid it.  Anyone think of a better solution that lets me use sensible Power settings?  Win 7 Pro.

     

    I know it's not "green", but I just let my systems run 24/7.  The drives (other than SSD) are set to spin down, and the monitors to shut off (per the power policy), but the motherboard just stays on, and my systems just run and run for weeks on end without error.  I do backups every night.

     

    Windows 7 has never been perfect about bringing back all its hardware after suspending and resuming.  Microsoft says Windows 8 will improve on this. Time will tell.

     

    Also, based on my 36 years experience in the computer industry, I have observed that heating/cooling cycles are not good for digital hardware.  Connectors tend to shrink and expand and you tend to get more frequent failures in a system that's powered-down than one that's left online and the temperature kept more stable.  Only thing is you have to clean the dust out more frequently.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
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    May 24, 2010
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    May 6, 2012 4:02 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel, it is leaving my system on overnight that has suddenly started being a problem, because two of the three external drives are not there on wake up. Strangely, my wife has suddenly started having a similar, but worse problem, because she can't wake her system from deep sleep at all! I have now tried setting the advanced Power settings to avoid hibernation, so will see how that pans out. 

     

    Google definitely brings up lots of hits on the problem though, some of them to do with dodgy driver updates.  I am thinking I’ll need to follow that route before finding a permanent solution.  I used to enjoy chasing down computer problems, but I am over that sort of thing nowadays, and just want to get on with using the things!

     

    Sorry for the OT guys.

     
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