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This article originally appeared on http://alt-web.com/TUTORIALS/?id=add_google_to_bootstrap_search_bar

Start with a Bootstrap document and the default (light) or inverse (dark) navbar. Your navbar code should look something like this:

 

<nav class="navbar navbar-inverse" role="navigation">

<div class="container">

<div class="navbar-header">

<button type="button" class="navbar-toggle" data-toggle="collapse" data-target="#navbar1">

<span class="sr-only">Toggle navigation</span>

<span class="icon-bar"></span>

<span class="icon-bar"></span>

<span class="icon-bar"></span>

</button>

<a class="navbar-brand" href="#">XYZ Company</a></div>

<!-- add menu items-->

<div class="collapse navbar-collapse" id="navbar1">

<ul class="nav navbar-nav">

<li class="active"><a href="#">Home</a></li>

<li><a href="#">About</a></li>

<li><a href="#">Services</a></li></ul>

<!-- ADD SEARCH FORM HERE -->

<form class="navbar-form navbar-right" role="search">

<div class="input-group">

<input type="text" class="form-control" placeholder="Search">

<span class="input-group-btn">

<button type="submit" class="btn btn-default">

<span class="glyphicon glyphicon-search"></span>

</button>

</span>

</div>

</form>

</div>

</div>

</nav>

 

How do I make my search bar functional?

Generic search forms in templates are just for show. They don't actually DO anything until you connect them to a bonafide search engine — either a scripted one of your own making or a 3rd party service.

 

Assuming your site is not dynamically driven with server-side code and content stored in a database, building your own search engine is out of the question. Static HTML sites must rely on 3rd party search engine software or services like Google.

NOTE: For best results, your site must be fully indexed by Google. It often takes 3-4 weeks or more for Google to find and fully index new websites.

 

How can I get Google to index my new website sooner?

You can help escalate the process by creating an XML Sitemap and uploading it to your server's root folder. Then submit the sitemap URL to Google through your Google Webmaster Tools Account. Full site indexing still requires several days or weeks. So be patient.

 

Google Search Code:

<script>
//GOOGLE SEARCH
//Enter domain of site to search
var domainroot="example.com"
function Gsitesearch(curobj){
curobj.q.value="site:"+domainroot+" "+curobj.qfront.value
}
</script>
<form class="search" action="http://www.google.com/search" method="get" onSubmit="Gsitesearch(this)">
<input name="q" type="hidden" />
<input name="qfront" type="search" required class="searchField" placeholder="Google Site Search" maxlength="50"/>
<input type="submit" class="search-button" value="SEARCH" />
</form>

 

On line 4 above, change the domainroot="example.com" to your website's actual domain (i.e. www.yourdomain.com or yourdomain.com). Use whichever produces the best results on Google. If unsure, open your browser and type site:www.yourdomain.com in the address bar. Hit Enter/Return/Go. If you don't see any results, try it without the www prefix.

 

By now you're probably asking yourself "How do I combine Google's code with what I already have?"

It's simple.  Starting on line 19 of the Bootstrap navbar code, add Google's <script> above the form tag. Make other substitutions as shown below.

 

<!-- ADD SEARCH FORM HERE -->

<script>
//GOOGLE SEARCH
//Enter domain of site to search.
var domainroot="example.com"
function Gsitesearch(curobj){ curobj.q.value="site:"+domainroot+" "+curobj.qfront.value }
</script>
<form class="search navbar-form navbar-right" action="http://www.google.com/search" method="get"role="search" onSubmit="Gsitesearch(this)">
<div class="input-group"> <input name="q" type="hidden" />
<input class="form-control" name="qfront" type="search" required class="searchField" placeholder="Google Site Search" maxlength="50"/>
<span class="input-group-btn"> <button type="submit" class="search-button btn btn-primary">
<span class="glyphicon glyphicon-search"></span>
</button>
</span>
</div>
</form>
</div>
</div>
</nav>

 

And there you have it. A working Search Bar made with Bootstrap and Google’s powerful search engine. Hope you enjoyed this brief tutorial.

 

By Nancy O'Shea, ACP / Web Developer
Web Site: http://alt-web.com

Editor's Note: This is one of a continuing series of interviews with notables in the creative industry. This week, we talk with the crazy but amazingly innovative Nick van der Walle – CEO of Astute Graphics.

 

Your Name

Nicholas van der Walle

please-help.jpeg

#1 What is your primary job title?

Managing Director (the red squirrel equivalent of the title “CEO”)

 

#2 Who or what inspires you?

Great design defined by craftsmanship, attention to detail and innovation – be it graphic or engineering.

 

#3 What do you think about when alone in your car?

What does that flashing light mean? Sometimes the one that’s been following me for the past three miles.

 

#4 Share a life lesson you learned?

Be good to others, especially if they are good to you. This can manifest itself from a sincere “thank you” to ensuring you pay as soon as an invoice hits the desk… there’s typically no excuse otherwise for either gesture.

 

#5 Favorite period of history?

Tomorrow. Sure the past is important and sometimes fun to learn from, but it’s only tomorrow we have the power to shape into what we consider the ideal.

 

#6 What projects are you working on right now?

Strange you ask that… let me whisper it to you.

 

#7 Describe your personal style.

Spontaneous. Creative. Random. Dimensional accuracy OCD.

 

#8 What tech tools do you use in your work?

Illustrator coupled with Astute Graphics’ plug-ins (astutegraphics.com), naturally! However, the work I’m meant to concentrate on now-a- days all takes place in email, a myriad of web services, Excel, TextWrangler, GotoMeeting and many more.

 

#9 When did you know you&#39;d found your calling?

In my teens. I always liked design and innovation, but the first 10 years were related to the mechanical world. It was only in my early 20’s that I realized infernal computers had won the war against the mighty drawing board and set square.

 

#10 What's your super power?

Embarrassing Cocktail Man. Doesn’t matter which I randomly point to on a menu, it always arrives in a Martini style glass with umbrella and impaled cherry. Sometimes with a passing flourish of sugar glistening in the spot lights. Always makes me look simultaneously butch and mysterious.

 

#11 Peanut Butter: Creamy or Chunky?

Creamy. No – wait… chunky. Unless on toast. Then definitely creamy.

 

#12 What makes you happy?

Lego. Bought for my wonderful young son. Obviously.

 

#13 What do you do to relax?

Hiding the Lego from my son (and wife!) and building it for display in the office.

 

#14 Your place of birth?

England. Previously in the parish of Europe.

 

#15 Favorite artist or art movement?

M C Escher. Unique and a true genius!

 

#16 Share a funny moment from your career?

Strangely, it involved San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge, two crazy and amazing ladies and an infestation of fog. But I never talk about that.

 

#17 Color of the car you drive?

Black.

 

#18 Any new skills you'd like to learn?

Welding. Then I would be complete as a human.

 

#19 How do you get your news?

By mistake.

 

#20 Advice to other creatives?

Specialize. And then ensure you become damn good at that niche by admitting every day you never know it all, resulting in constant skills development.

I developed this infographic to share some of my best design tips for eLearning developers.

It was created with Adobe Illustrator. Hope you find it helpful!

eLearning Design Tips2.png

Editor's Note: This is one of a continuing series of interviews with notables in the creative industry. This week, we talk with the immensely talented Von Glitschka – Creative Director/Designer/Artist.

 

Your Name

Von Glitschka AKA Vonster

 

vonster.jpg

 

#1 What is your primary job title?

Creative Director, Illustrative Designer, Author, Snarky Twitter User

 

#2 Who or what inspires you?

I can get lost looking through curated archives of deep space photography. All the incredibly colorful interstellar clouds of dust, the “Pillars of Creation” from the Eagle nebula is pretty cool. But just looking at these and realizing how expansive the universe is puts things into perspective quickly.

 

#3 What do you think about when alone in your car?

I’m usually having a conversation with myself. Thinking through what I’m going to say to a client in regards to a creative pitch or responding to design feedback. I find myself carrying on an imaginary conversations to work out dialogue for a story I’m developing. Today while driving I figured out how to phrase something I’m going to record for my Lynda.com design course I’ll be recording.

  Temporal_Monk.jpg

 

#4 Share a life lesson you learned?

I love creating art and design. But I realize in the grand scheme of things it’s not that important. Life is too short not to use your talent to help improve the lives of others. Giving legs to empathy if you will. This can be as simple as working with a smaller budget to help a small business get on their feet, or donating your time to create promotions for a local good cause like a food bank or feeding the homeless.

 

My buddy Justin Ahrens would be a good example of this. He inspires me with his servant’s heart. 

 

#5 Favorite period of history?

This is hard. I love reading historical non-fiction. One of my favorite authors is David McCullough, his book 1776 made me really enjoy studying the colonial period and the American Revolutionary war. Another great book was The Pirate Coast by Richard Zacks, this fundamentally changed my understanding of geopolitics. It was an incredible story and would make a great movie. It also made me realize the history I had learned in school is far too idealistic and simplified for the complexity that is history.

 

#6 What projects are you working on right now?

Me and my daughter who works with me have been developing sticker sets for Apple Messages that are now available on the iTunes store. You can view two sets on our web site here.

 

stickers.jpg

 

#7 Describe your personal style.

Chameleon. I’m adaptive to whatever the project needs or requires. One of the first decisions I have to make when approaching a design be it a logo, brand character, or illustration is the style that will drive the aesthetic.

 

That said I have my personal favorites in terms of style. One new style I discovered this year through some experimentation is vector painting. That is a fun one to work in. This snake illustration is completely vector based. You can see more at my site and get the vector brushes I used here.

 

painted_snake.jpg

 

#8 What tech tools do you use in your work?

My main tools are my pencil, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop. For me analog facilitates digital. And I think every designer should be drawing regardless if they ever want to become an illustrator. Drawing is designs best friend and helps facilitate ideation and cognitive processes.

 

#9 When did you know you'd found your calling?

When I was a little kid I saw an ad in MAD magazine saying you could make a living drawing cartoons. So I figured I’d do something like that. I’ve always been drawn to visuals and artwork since I was little.

 

#10 What's your super power?

Maybe teaching? I like sharing my creative process and how to approach and solve design oriented problems. Not sure I’d call it a super power though? I wrote a whole book about my creative process that can empower other designers to achieve their creative goals. That said, I’d much rather be able to turn invisible though, that would be cool.

 

VBT2_Book.jpg

 

#11 Peanut Butter: Creamy or Chunky?

On an english muffin, creamy. On a peanut butter and honey sandwich, chunky.

 

#12 What makes you happy?

My two daughters, a good book, BBQ, and sci-fi stories that have a time machine in the plot.

 

#13 What do you do to relax?

Read.

 

#14 Your place of birth?

Land of the Green Mermaid, Seattle.

 

#15 Favorite artist or art movement?

Jim Flora, 1950’s art director for RCA records. I have all his albums hanging outside my studio.

 

#16 Share a funny moment from your career?

A Korean beverage company stole my art and used it on their soda cans. I contacted the company showed them my copyright registration of the design and they in turn contacted the designer who had done the work for them and told him he had to pay my usage fee. I was paid, but I told them I was retaining ownership to the copyright. They agreed.

 

A year goes by and they ask me if they can buy the copyright, I said they could buy it for use in Korea but I was going to keep it state side. They agreed and bought the artwork.

 

Another eight months goes by and they contact me saying they can’t register the design with their copyright office because another Korean company had ripped off the same artwork of mine and had already registered it before them.

 

I contacted the new company now infringing and they were a lot bigger and their lawyers basically told me to go pound sand and dared me to go after them. I talked to my copyright lawyer and he said “If you were Apple, or Google you could. But this isn’t worth the amount you’d have to pay and there is no guarantee.”

 

Last month a company in London stole the same art and is using it as the identity for a high-end condo owned by a lawyer. Moral of the story, lawyers are weasels.

 

#17 Color of the car you drive?

Red

 

#18 Any new skills you'd like to learn?

Grammar. I drew too much in English class so I kind of suck at grammar. Thank god for good editors. I have a course I ordered on writing but haven’t cracked it open yet. I need to do that.

 

#19 How do you get your news?

I’m an RSS junkie. I subscribe to an insane amount of RSS feeds and wade through those and discover stories and articles that mainstream ignore. I also love podcasts and one of the best for deconstructing news is No Agenda Podcast hosted by Adam Curry and John C. Dvorak.

 

#20 Advice to other creatives?

Never stop drawing!

 

GlitschkaStudios.com

DrawingVectorGraphics.com

DVGLab.com

@vonster

Instagram

During my life, I have felt an attraction towards Celtic culture and evidently its graphics designs have intrigued and fascinated me. Without fear of making a mistake, I think the Triquetra is one of the most recognized ones. Its definition in Wikipedia is:

Triquetra (/traɪˈkwɛtrə/; Latin tri- "three" and quetrus "cornered") originally meant "triangle" and was used to refer to various three-cornered shapes. It has come to refer exclusively to a particular more complicated shape formed of three vesicae piscis, sometimes with an added circle in or around it. Also known as a "trinity knot," the design is used as a religious symbol adapted from ancient Celtic images by Christianity. It is similar to Odin's symbol, the valknut.

Drawing this figure in Illustrator requires a certain level of skill, but with DynamicShapes, SubScribe and VectorScribe2 the task becomes easier.

You can download a 14 day trial of the plug-ins here: www.astutegraphics.com

Initial Guide

Using DynamicShapes, we draw a equilateral triangle with an external diameter of 2 inches.

The angle will be 0º, so it lays on one of its bases.

01_Celtic.gif

If you don’t have DynamicShapes you can download a demo versión for 14 days or use regular polygons in Illustrator.

We need to find the geometrical center of the figure. The correct form to do this is to draw a perpendicular line between every vertex of the figure and it’s opposite side. SubScribe allows us to do this in a blink of an eye. We use the “Line Perpendicular to Path” tool and draw a line from each vertex. (You can download SubScribe free at Astute Graphics website.)

02_Celtic.gif

Once we have located the geometrical center, we draw a circle that touches the center of each side of the triangle and that is inside itself. We click the “a” vertex, then we click and hold on “b” and move it without letting go towards point “c”. (See the Animation) We use Circle by 2 or 3 points tool (part of SubScribe).

03_Celtic.gif

For practical effects we convert this circle into a triangle. DynamicShapes makes the process easier: with the circle selected we chose “Convert to DynamicShape” in the options panel.

04_Celtic.gif

We convert the circle into a polygon by clicking on the panel and assign 3 sides on “Sides”

05_Celtic.gif

We select the objects and convert them into guides (View > Guides > Make Guides).

Building

The structure we did before has as objective to establish the basic points for the Triquetra because we require 3 arcs that have a radius which should surpass 2 vertexes and the triangle intersections inside, with the bisectors of the external triangle.

07_Celtic.gif

Using “Arc by three points” of SubScribe we draw the necessary arcs, following this steps: click on point 1, click and hold on point 2, then locate the cursor on the intersection opposite to the side were we are working. (See figure).

08_Celtic.gif

We assign a thickness of 10 pts to each line and then we fuse the 3 arcs into a single figure using the command “Object > Path> Join”.

09_Celtic.gif

10_Celtic.gif

Once again with DynamicShapes we draw a circle with 2 inches of diameter, stroke 10 pts.

11_Celtic.gif

The next step is a little bit strange but it is vital when you need to simulate the intersection of the shapes. With the “Scissor” tool we cut the initial figure in the anchor points marked in the next figure:

12_Celtic.gif

Once we cut the figure we assign color that will help identify each different parts. In this case we use gray #999999 and orange # F7931E.

13_Celtic.gif

We convert the lines into shapes with the command “Object > Path> Outline Stroke”.

14_Celtic.gif

We assign a stroke color black of 2 pts to all the objects. (Note the central zone of the symbol).

15_Celtic.gif

We convert our figure into a “Line Paint Object”. (In my case I am using the tool “Live Paint Bucket”, but you can also activated in the menu “Object > Live Paint > Make”). This way we can paint the fills and the strokes of the object in an independent way. Live Paint converts the “paths” that intersect in independent zones to color.

16_Celtic.gif

To paint the fills we first double click over the tool “Live Paint Bucket” and in “Options”, we select only “Paint Fills”. We place the cursor over the areas we want to paint and when click on them it paints the color the cursor indicates.

You can navigate between colors in the “Swatches” panel using the right and left arrow keys to move between groups and the up and down arrow keys to change group. If you want to know more details about “Live Paint” I invite you to visit the “Never Stop Learning” site from our friend Sebastian Bleak here: https://goo.gl/ro8Btb

18_Celtic.gif

 

After painting the indicated areas (that simulate the interconnections of the shapes), it is time to “Fine Tune” the lines: once again we double click the tool “Live Paint”. This time we activate “Paint Strokes” (this way we make sure that only the strokes are being painted).

19_Celtic.gif

Start by painting with black with a thickness of 2 pts on the required areas. (Recommendation: See the image of the example so you do not skip any lines).

20_Celtic.gif

Next we Paint with “None” the lines that are not supposed to appear.

21_Celtic.gif

22_Celtic.gif

Even though it is a simple figure, when we apply “Outline Stroke” Illustrator adds unnecessary points that we remove with “Smart Remove Brush” (Part of VectorScribe)

23_Celtic.gif

As a final detail we can add a drop shadow effect with Stylism.

24_Celtic.jpg

Stay tune for the next tutorial!

Editor's Note: This is one of a continuing series of interviews with notables in the creative industry. This week, we talk with Michael Clawson – Designer, photographer, author.

 

#1 What is your primary job title?


Chief Fish, Big Fish Creations


  

#2 Who or what inspires you?


Life, and learning new things


  

#3 What do you think about when alone in your car?

That I'm really driving a Lamborghini

 

#4 Share a life lesson you learned?

Always appreciate people you love. One day, you may lose them.

As I Wander I Dream.JPG

#5 Favorite period of history?

1980s

 

#6 What projects are you working on right now?

Branding and Economic Development

 

#7 Describe your personal style.

I prefer to go with the flow, being inspired by the moment. Yet in my mind, I usually see the solution to the creative problem.

Michae_Clawson_iPhoneographer.jpg

#8 What tech tools do you use in your work?

Mostly Adobe products, mixed with Apple and third-party iOS apps

 

#9 When did you know you'd found your calling?

When I was in second grade, I wrote my first poem and later performed it in a talent contest. Creativity has been my calling ever since.


  

#10 What's your super power?

In times of stress, I can lift 100 tons of air.

 

#11 Peanut Butter: Creamy or Chunky?

Creamy Jif. Or is that Creamy Gif? Hmmmmm.

Sky Dancing.JPG

#12 What makes you happy?

Happiness.

 

#13 What do you do to relax?

Play music. Watch TV. Read. Oh, and sleep.

 

#14 Your place of birth?

Salt Lake City, Utah

 

#15 Favorite artist or art movement?

Picasso, Cubism

 

#16 Share a funny moment from your career?

During a job interview, my future boss reviewed my resume and said: "You know, you're not gonna get more money than me."

Beach_Boy.jpg

#17 Color of the car you drive?

Black

 

#18 Any new skills you'd like to learn?

Underwater basket weaving. It's a life goal.

 

#19 How do you get your news?

80% internet, 20% TV

 

#20 Advice to other creatives?

Be humble, funny, and have a great sense of humor. Always accept criticism as a learning experience. Be open to change.

Editor's Note: This is one of a continuing series of interviews with notables in the creative industry. This week, we talk with Bob Staake – American illustrator, cartoonist, children's book author and designer.


bob NEW.jpg

#1 What is your primary job title?


Freelance badass.


 

#2 Who or what inspires you?


Sounds trite, but EVERYTHING.


 

#3 What do you think about when alone in your car?

I’m never alone in my car, but often while in the backseat I often think “boy, my driver sure is going bald."

 

#4 Share a life lesson you learned?

Wait at least 24 hours before emailing a death threat to your publisher.

 

#5 Favorite period of history?

I have no favorite periods, per se, but I am rather attached to a few very special commas.

 

bob3.jpg  bob5.jpg


 

#6 What projects are you working on right now?

New Yorker covers, 9 children’s books, a novel, and hopefully by November I’ll finish carpeting the studio loft.

 

#7 Describe your personal style.

I have no personal style, but basically I try to pass myself off as a hobo so nobody bothers me on the street.

 

#8 What tech tools do you use in your work?

Adobe LOVES when I say this: Photoshop 3.0.

 

#9 When did you know you'd found your calling?

When I discovered that I could write and illustrate stupid stories and staple them together so they vaguely resembled books. Once I found a way to turn a page into a page into a page, I was hooked.


 

#10 What's your super power?

The ability to bake the most awesome chocolate chips cookies without a recipe — and 50% less chocolate chips.

 

#11 Peanut Butter: Creamy or Chunky?

I refuse to answer this on the grounds that it might increaminate me. Oh, damn — I gave it away!

 

bob4.JPG

 

#12 What makes you happy?

I LOVE solving problems. Give me a door that doesn’t close right and I’ll fix it. Such a simple thing, but I honestly enjoy working things out, determining what the problem is, and then fixing the whole thing.

 

#13 What do you do to relax?

I read, I paint, i make things with wood. i love movies and can watch the same one over and over 70 times. my family and friends think that sounds crazy, but I learn something EVERY time i watch a film.

 

#14 Your place of birth?

I'm convinced this is a thinly-veiled effort to access my bank password, but I’ll play along: Santa Monica, California

 

#15 Favorite artist or art movement?

SO many - but l’ll say Alvin Lustig if only I hope readers of this interview will Google him.

 

#16 Share a funny moment from your career?

I recently illustrated a Little Golden Book by Margaret Wise Brown. Believe it or not there was scene where I had to show a pig run over by a steamroller. I illustrated the scene in the most “tasteful” way I could, but then my editor asked “Bob, could you make the pig look FLATTER?"

 

bob new 2.jpg

 

#17 Color of the car you drive?

A black Porsche, but it was gray before I crashed it.

 

#18 Any new skills you'd like to learn?

Would LOVE to play the bass guitar like Bootsie Collins — which means, of course, that i should probably first buy a bass guitar.

 

#19 How do you get your news?

I read a lot - the Washington Post and New York Times. The New Yorker. If you press it into my face, I’ll read it.

 

#20 Advice to other creatives?

In the beginning, you'll have to do a lot of uncreative work just to pay the bills. Just pay the bills as fast as possible and MOVE ON!

kstohlmeyer1

Where the experts learn

Posted by kstohlmeyer1 Oct 3, 2016

In today's fast paced creative world, you may find it difficult at times to keep up with the deluge of technology you use for your career or for fun. It can become overwhelming or worse, disappointing when you get erroneous advice or information. I get asked this a lot in my travels for Adobe and speaking at various events across the country – "How do you know all this?" or "How do you keep up?"

 

I fully admit that simply learning everything the Adobe Creative Cloud has to offer could become a full-time endeavor. But many of us don't have the time to commit to this, outside of attending a higher education institution.  So here are some sure-fired resources that I personally use or have had recommended to me by peers and colleagues in the Adobe community.

 

First, for troubleshooting or software issues always turn to the Adobe Forums. There are so many knowledgeable folks here that can assist you or work your problem it makes me smile to see issues answered. You are already here reading this blog, so you are ahead of the game. But did you know that the badges under our profile photos actually mean something? Having an ACP (Adobe Community Professional), MVP or Adobe community member badge means we are a trusted resource. It can help to filter out a lot of the chatter that can occur on popular threads.

 

Some folks like websites, some in-person training. For the latter, be sure to check out Adobe Authorized Training Partners. These are local training partners that have a classroom waiting for you. They are vetted and approved by Adobe to offer a multitude of training subjects from video to web to print. You can find more at https://training.adobe.com/training/partner-finder.html

 

Adobe also has a ton of online courses and tutorials available for free at https://helpx.adobe.com/learn.html?promoid=KTTAU#/top_products simply click the application you wish to learn more about and find tutorials and tips for all skill levels from beginners to "What's New" and "Key Techniques".

 

If you are willing to pay for excellent video training, you can always go to the incomparable lynda.com. I am not only an author, but I am also a customer! I am always amazed at the plethora of content on this site, from management skills to how to use a Wacom tablet, there is always something new to learn. If you want to dip your toe in the pool and try lynda before you subscribe use this link to get a 10-day free trial: http://bit.ly/2dpUZM6

 

Other great free online resources include:

InDesign:

InDesign Secrets - http://indesignsecrets.com

 

Photoshop:

Tip Squirrel Photoshop tips - http://www.tipsquirrel.com

Glyn Dewis Photoshop Guru - https://www.glyndewis.com

Deke Online, Deke McClelland - http://www.deke.com

PhotoshopCAFE - http://photoshopcafe.com

Julieanne Kost - http://blogs.adobe.com/jkost/

Photoshop Training Channel - https://photoshoptrainingchannel.com

 

Photography:

Scott Kelby's Blog - http://scottkelby.com

PetaPixel - http://petapixel.com

Photofocus - https://photofocus.com

 

Illustrator:

Tuts+ - https://design.tutsplus.com/categories/adobe-illustrator

Vec Tips - http://vectips.com

Astute Graphics - http://astutegraphics.com/tutorials-blog/

 

Web:

Site Inspire- https://www.siteinspire.com

Smashing Magazine- https://www.smashingmagazine.com

Daily JS - http://www.dailyjs.com/

Dreamweaver Team Blog- http://blogs.adobe.com/dreamweaver/

 

Remember, this is a continuing effort to keep up with today's tech, but finding reliable sources to filter out the noise and get to the heart of what you need to learn definitely helps bring you back into the game. I hope you find this post helpful and if you have comments or any favorite sites you'd like to add, hit me up!