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All you wanted to do is save your little file and Illustrator just popped up another one of those pesky warnings…

legacyfile.gif

 

Think that this doesn't affect you, because there's no text in your file? Think again.

 

You (just) installed a new version of Illustrator and opened a file from your clipart library or an old artwork that you updated to your client's needs. Or you received a file from a coworker or a client. Whatever it was - the file is older than the Illustrator version you're currently using. Illustrator calls this kind of documents »legacy files« and when you try to save (via File > Save) this kind of file after you made a change to it, you receive this error. That is: when you're lucky (we'll talk about the not so lucky case later).

 

Why does Illustrator even bother you when there's no text in your file?

Well, lots of Illustrator files don't contain text. In fact text is the kind of thing you need to worry least about when you get this warning. You can repair the things that happen to text, because text will just reflow.

It's the »disable some editing features« thing you really need to worry about. Every Illustrator update brings new features to the application. New options to existing functions, new kinds of appearances, brushes or strokes and even new kinds of objects, which an older version of course might not be able to handle at all.

Therefore all the objects that the older version can't handle are expanded. That is outlined or even converted to rasters. Which means: you won't be able to make changes easily or in the case of rasters you might not even be able to scale this anymore.

 

Some examples of what might happen to certain objects:
Table of issues (when downsaving from CC)

 

Feature

 

saved to

CS6

CS5

CS4

CS3

CS2

text objects

OK

OK

OK - there might be reflows

gradients

OK

OK, but gradients on strokes will be expanded

OK for ordinary gradients. Expanded if the gradient has been oval, rotated, its origin has been moved or if it has been applied to a stroke.

transparent gradients

OK

OK

OK

an opacity mask is applied

meshes

OK

OK

OK

OK

OK

transparent meshes

OK

OK

an opacity mask is applied

art brushes

OK

OK

only stay editable when they have correct fill rule, don't have corner adjustment and don't stretch between guides

Pattern brushes

OK

Expanded, if automatic corner tiles have been used

patterns

OK

OK

OK

OK

OK

arrowheads

OK

OK

expanded

dashed strokes

OK

OK

expanded when corner adjustment is applied

drop shadows

OK

expanded

blur, inner glow

OK

OK

OK

OK

OK

outer glow

OK

expanded

gaussian blur

OK

expanded

Live Shapes

Expanded to plain paths

 

This table just mentions some issues, there are more. There are issues when downsaving from other versions as well.

 

OK, but why does Illustrator even save an old version? I didn't tell it to.

Yes, you did. Every time you just do File > Save, Illustrator saves to the version the file has been created in. Only when you do File > Save as you're able to deliberately select a version you want to save your file to.

 

So what do I do when I get this warning?

  1. Be happy. Illustrator warned you and didn't just save. You belong to the lucky few that didn't just dismiss this dialog box checking the »Don't show again« option. In case you checked this option, open the preferences and reset all warnings.
  2. Cancel the Save and select »Save as«.
  3. When doing save as, you've got two options:
    3.a you can save the file using the identical name thus overwriting the legacy file. This is fine when you're certain that neither you nor anybody else will ever need to open it in the old version again.
    3.b you can change the new keeping the legacy file. This is fine in case you or someone else will need to open it in the old version again. Might be needed when working in an environment with mixed versions.

 

What you shouldn't do:

Just go on saving. This is only safe when the document doesn't contain any more than simple paths.

 

What you shouldn't do. Ever:

Check »Don't show again«. This effectively makes you blind to file versions.

Actually turning off any warnings might keep you from working efficiently, because you always have to bother why Illustrator won't do what you told it to. Was it because you clicked in the wrong place or because you selected some kind of artwork that doesn't go with the function concerned? You won't know without the warning.

 

Let's get to the not so lucky case.

In case you didn't get the warning or you just clicked OK (Don't bother me, just do what I just said), your file has been saved and your shadow (or brush or whatever it was) can't be edited any more. Good luck with your file. Let's hope you still have a copy of an earlier version with editable objects somewhere. Rebuild the effects or brushes is some kind of nasty job you just don't want to do. It's as inefficient as it might get.

 

Work safely!

 

There's rarely a sector obsessed so much with novelties as our advertising and design industry. Yet there's also rarely a business sector being so trapped in the past and clinching to old »truths« as ours. One of those traditions is the EPS file format. Many colleagues still consider (and use) it as the standard for embedding and exchanging everything in everything else.

Actually the file format hasn't been updated in this millenium. What's standard nowadays and where the fun is, is not supported in EPS: ICC color profiles and transparency.

Someone might contradict and say that an EPS saved from and opened again in Illustrator shows transparency and is fully editable.

That's brought about by the way Illustrator saves EPS (as well as other exchange formats). Most people probably know the option »Preserve Illustrator editing capabilities« when saving a PDF. When you check it, Illustrator embeds a complete AI file into the PDF (which effectively doubles file size).

Same thing happens when you save an EPS. Only you can't deactivate it, the AI part of the file will always be saved. Once you open that EPS in Illustrator, the software actually opens that AI part. You only get to see the EPS part when you open the file in any other software than Illustrator or when you place the EPS in Illustrator.

Which leads us to the selection of the EPS version. This selection actually doesn't affect the EPS, since there has never been a version higher than 3. It rather affects the version of the embedded AI part of the file. With Version »Illustrator 10 EPS« it is saved in a way that it can be opened with Illustrator 10. Objects will be converted into something that can be edited with that version. Some brushes, some kinds of transparency and some effects might still be editable afterwards. Also text stays editable under certain circumstances (e.g. it mustn't contain ligatures), although text objects often get separated into their molecules – that is single letters.


save-eps.png

The EPS part of the file can also be opened with resp. placed into lower versions of Illustrator. In the EPS part of the file everything is expanded that's not part of the EPS specification, which is pratically everything apart from basic strokes, basic fills and very basic gradients.

In case what you're after is saving a file for maximum editability, just selecting EPS might not be enough. You probably need to do various tests, for instance FreeHand can't even open EPS 10. Corel Draw from X5 up on the contrary can interpret an AI CS4 remarkably well.

What is EPS good for then? You actually only need it for compatibility with e.g. some highly specialized software in the gravure or plotting area or as lowest common denominator for exchanging very basic drawings with software that doesn't read/write anything else. Some 3D software or some font editors belong in this group.

Unfortunately most microstock agencies insist in providing files as EPS 10, although the format is practically of not too much use. On the one hand this »version 10« is only present in Illustrator, on the other hand saving to this format still ruins so much in the file that even in Illustrator it's practically ineditable.