11 Replies Latest reply: Feb 12, 2012 4:25 AM by Jacob Bugge RSS

    using a clipping mask

    JimVag1947 Community Member

      I saw a video tutorial(here in adobe) as to how a mask is created.

       

      The quesion is if the only way to create a mask is by "placing" an image in the artwork. Let me explain.

       

      I have created a frame and behide it i have placed a blue rectangular, i want the framed "filled" with this blue color.

       

      As i understand it, i will have to use a mask to achieve what i want, nonetheless this seems not to be possible with what i describe above.

       

      SO, can i use mask in what is described above?

       

      If not, what are my alternatives?

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: using a clipping mask
          Kurt Gold Community Member

          Which version of Illustrator are you using?

           

          You may also want to show a sketch about what you're going to do. It's not that crystal-clear as you may think.

          • 2. Re: using a clipping mask
            Steve Fairbairn Community Member

            You can use a clipping mask to mask anything, vector objects or placed images.

            What you do is this:

            Put your masking object in front of the object you want to mask.

            Select both and Object > Clipping Mask > Make.

             

            If your masking object consists of two paths you must make a compound of them before creating your mask.

             

            Note that all colour attributes that the masking object may have had before the mask was made will disappear, but you can colour the mask separately afterwards.

            A fill to the mask will (strangely) appear behind the masked objects.

            • 3. Re: using a clipping mask
              John Danek Community Member

              Do you want the frame itself Blue?  Or the inside area of the frame Blue?  Either way, it'll be a matter of creating a rectangle or two and manipulating some anchor points as necessary.  Simple stuff.

              • 4. Re: using a clipping mask
                JETalmage Community Member

                The generic and better term for what Illustrator calls a Clipping Mask is clipping path. Abiding by this convention would help reduce confusion due to the fact that Illustrator has other masking features which do not have to be paths: Opacity masks.

                 

                But  by your description you merely want to fill a rectangle with a blue color. Neither masking feature is necessary to do that. Simply give the rectangle a blue fill.

                 

                So if that's not what you are trying to do, you need to explain the situation better.

                 

                JET

                • 5. Re: using a clipping mask
                  Wade_Zimmerman Community Member

                  Is this frme y0ou refer to a raster image that you placed in Illustrator. In the case you might need to amke an Opacity Mask

                  • 6. Re: using a clipping mask
                    JimVag1947 Community Member

                    Ok let me clarify things a little.

                     

                     

                    Do you want the frame itself Blue?  Or the inside area of the frame Blue?  Either way, it'll be a matter of creating a rectangle or two and manipulating some anchor points as necessary.  Simple stuff.

                    I want the inside area of the frame blue

                     

                     

                    Wade_Zimmerman wrote:

                     

                    Is this frme y0ou refer to a raster image that you placed in Illustrator. In the case you might need to amke an Opacity Mask

                    No it is not a raster image.

                    I am uploading an image for you to see. As you see below, i have  a blue rectangular and the frame, the frame is 4 vector objects grouped together so as to form the frame you see.

                     

                    main_article_back.png

                    • 7. Re: using a clipping mask
                      Kurt Gold Community Member

                      Put a blue rectangle below the frame objects and group all.

                       

                      You could also use Live Paint, but you don't state which version of AI you're using.

                      • 8. Re: using a clipping mask
                        Jacob Bugge MVP

                        Dimitris,

                         

                        If I understand it in the right way, you can just set the size of the blue rectangle and move either that or the frame parts. so that its boundaries fit the inner shape of the frame, or just somewhere between the inner and outer shapes; in the latter case, the outermost part of the rectangle is hidden beneath the frame parts.

                         

                        Edit: Hi Kurt.

                        • 9. Re: using a clipping mask
                          Steve Fairbairn Community Member

                          What Jacob says.

                           

                          But why don't the corners of the frame line up properly?

                          The ends should be cut off at 45° if they are to form a good mitre.

                          • 10. Re: using a clipping mask
                            JimVag1947 Community Member

                            You could also use Live Paint, but you don't state which version of AI you're using.

                             

                            I use illustrator CS5, so, yes, live paint is available, thans for informing me about it.

                             

                             

                            Dimitris,

                             

                            If I understand it in the right way, you can just set the size of the blue rectangle and move either that or the frame parts. so that its boundaries fit the inner shape of the frame, or just somewhere between the inner and outer shapes; in the latter case, the outermost part of the rectangle is hidden beneath the frame parts.

                             

                            Edit: Hi Kurt.

                             

                            Correct JAcob, i was asking also for educational purposes, to learn some ohter method too.

                             

                             

                            But why don't the corners of the frame line up properly?

                            The ends should be cut off at 45° if they are to form a good mitre.

                             

                            This is on purpose, to create a decoration effect.

                             

                            Thans for the info all, i got my answers.

                            • 11. Re: using a clipping mask
                              Jacob Bugge MVP

                              For my part you are welcome, Dimitris.