6 Replies Latest reply: Feb 20, 2012 12:12 PM by Jeff Schewe RSS

    How do you zero all sliders in LR4?

    jljonathan Community Member

      The default in previous versions of LR had the sliders set to various positions on import ie. Brightness 50 etc. You could zero out the slider by setting them at 0. Now with the sliders set to 0, yet LR adding a default processing, how to you zero out to start out flat?

        • 1. Re: How do you zero all sliders in LR4?
          web-weaver Community Member

          In the Develop Module under "Lightroom General Presets" you use the "General Zeroed".

          General 0.JPG

          WW

          • 2. Re: How do you zero all sliders in LR4?
            dj_paige Community Member

            jljonathan wrote:

             

            Now with the sliders set to 0, yet LR adding a default processing, how to you zero out to start out flat?

            To tell you the truth, if the sliders are at zero, then you are starting out flat. By the way, there's no such thing as a RAW that is "zeroed"  ... just to display the RAW every piece of software has to decide how to display it, and each piece of software uses different defaults for contrast, exposure, etc. The zeroed RAW will look different in each piece of software.

             

            Better you should spend your time an energy getting the photo to look the way you want them, than to spend time and energy starting from some mythical zero.

            • 3. Re: How do you zero all sliders in LR4?
              jljonathan Community Member

              When I use General-Zeroed LR sets all the sliders back to the zero position. But, this is not what I am asking since LR4 uses internal default settings when the sliders are set to zero (they are done behind the scenes) . As in LR 3, when zeroing the sliders you obtained a FLAT image with no (?) default corrections. I would like to know how to achieve the same thing in LR4, if possible.

              • 4. Re: How do you zero all sliders in LR4?
                web-weaver Community Member

                There are no internal default settings in LR unless you set them - for instance during import.

                In LR 4 you "zero`by setting the sliders to "0". This is different that in LR 3 where - for instance the "zero" setting for Brightness was at 50.

                In LR4 0" means "0".

                WW

                • 5. Re: How do you zero all sliders in LR4?
                  jljonathan Community Member

                  I don't think that we are talking about the same thing. For instance, in LR3, at default the sliders were set to settings that included Brightness 50,Contrast 25, Clarity 10, Tone curve medium etc. The sliders and tone curve were actually set to these points for default but you could zero everything out and arrive at a FLAT image. Now, with LR4 these defaults are set by LR inside, BUT with the sliders are zeroed out. Is there a way  in LR4 to to get to that same FLAT state?

                  • 6. Re: How do you zero all sliders in LR4?
                    Jeff Schewe Community Member

                    jljonathan wrote:

                     

                    The sliders and tone curve were actually set to these points for default but you could zero everything out and arrive at a FLAT image. Now, with LR4 these defaults are set by LR inside, BUT with the sliders are zeroed out. Is there a way  in LR4 to to get to that same FLAT state?

                     

                    No, not directly...you could set the sliders to zero with a linear curve in an image with PV 2010 and then convert the image to PV 2012. You'll end up with a minus Exposure of some number and a tone curve with multiple points already set to map the curve. But the image will have settings, no "zero'ed" as it was in PV 2010.

                     

                    This has already been discussed, see:

                    Develop basic sliders - truly zeroed?

                    and:

                    Zeroed Defaults vs. Zeroed RAW File?

                    And before you ask, no, it's not likely to change...