14 Replies Latest reply: Apr 27, 2012 9:29 AM by J. Simon RSS

    Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?

    Charles Bargar

      Truncation happens on ONLY on an MPG export.  Export to H264, and the audio file is not truncated on import to Encore. The audio file is actually NOT truncated.  M2T MPX'd files play fine in PowerDVD.  I went through the forums, and Bill Hunt answered "Conforming not Completed" is the problem. So, I ran a set of tests to confirm that interrupted conforming IS NOT the problem.  Steps to reproduce:  1. Close all Adobe programs. 2. Go to the Media Cache and Media Cache Files directories....  DELETE ALL FILES.    This causes any file being imported into Premiere to be "conformed" 3. Import a clip into Premiere, and wait for ALL conforming activity to complete.  4. Create a timeline, and place the clip into it. 5. Edit the timeline to about 1-2 minutes in length to make export processing quicker, and add a couple of chapter marks. 6. Export to BluRay MPG with MPX set to NONE (.M2V/.AC3) 7. Export to BluRay MPG with MPX set to TS (2nd output file name .M2T) 8. Export to BluRay H.264 with MPX set to TS (3rd output file name .M2T) 9. Play the M2T files from Step 7 and 8 using any Video Player.  The audio in it is NOT truncated.  19. Create an Encore Bluray project 11. Import each file as a timeline (Step 6 file includes both AC3 and M2V  12. Check the length of the Audio track in each timeline.  ONLY the step 7 file's audio is truncated.  13. Delete the MPX'd file from Encore, then delete it's associated XMPSES file. 14. Re-import into Encore as an Asset, and place the .M2T file in the timeline. 15. Voila!  The audio is no longer truncated, but all Chapter Marks are lost.  It looks like this is a problem with the creation of the XMPSES file when exporting to an MPG with multiplex set on. I posted it with a "Bug Report"

        • 1. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
          J. Simon Community Member

          when exporting to an MPG with multiplex set on.

           

          The solution here is to simply never do that.  Always set multiplexing to off if you plan to author a disk.

          • 2. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
            Charles Bargar Community Member

            Sounds like an answer I'd get from Adobe Support.  

            They've never resolved a problem I've reported with "bug reports", just say "don't do that!"

             

            I sometimes use the same file for two different purposes...  one for a DVD/BluRay, the other for displaying on the PC with PowerDVD.  Most video players available on the PC will not play non-MPX'd files properly.  They'll play the video and audio separately, but not together.

             

            Having a MPX'd file allows me to use one file for both purposes with a single (1-2 hr) render run.

            • 3. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
              J. Simon Community Member

              I sometimes use the same file for two different purposes

               

              Don't do that either.  Export the sequence in two different formats, one for authoring, one for computer playback.

               

              With the new CS6 AME, you can even do both at the same time.

              • 4. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                Charles Bargar Community Member

                Flame on....  Where are these "don't do that's" documented in the Premiere Help/User Guide, or are they the results of people getting unexpected results?    From studying the product documentation, I can find NOTHING that says you can't MPX an MPEG, and import it into Encore.  Even though they're useful, answers in the forums don't count.

                • 5. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                  J. Simon Community Member

                  are they the results of people getting unexpected results?

                   

                  No, they're just the way it's normally done.

                   

                  What's more, it works.

                  • 6. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                    Charles Bargar Community Member

                    Normally, a customer expects a product to act like it's documentation.  "How it's normally done (and works)" isn't part of why a customer buys a product.  Purchases are based on the product's documented features, and how a customer plans on using it to perform a task. 

                     

                    From 20+ years of experience in software engineering, if a feature is available, and doesn't work as documented, it's a bug, and it get's fixed.  Forums supplying "getarounds" (and "don't do that's" and "it's normally done that way" are getarounds) for how a product actually works are an OK solution for a temporary solution until the base problem is fixed by the development organization.

                    • 7. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                      J. Simon Community Member

                      Well, I didn't program the software, nor did I write the documentation.  I'm just a user like yourself.

                       

                      You can certainly file a bug report, but in the mean time, I've explained how to get the work done without issue.

                      • 8. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                        Charles Bargar Community Member

                         

                        You can certainly file a bug report

                        Been there, done that, and the line from Adobe has been silent.  Not even an acknowledgement that they received it.  This is my second time around on this problem.    I filed a bug report under CS4 for the same thing, and never heard anything on it either.

                        It seems like they never fix anything... just keep putting out "new" versions (with an upgrade sticker price) with the same bugs that were there in the previous one.

                         

                         

                        Apologies, but my (slightly acrid) remarks were not directed at the forum participants.  I know that they are all users.  My frustration got the better of me, because I spent 25+ years in software development, and never saw a lack of response for problems in a product like I've experienced with Adobe.

                        • 9. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                          J. Simon Community Member

                          It's true, Adobe rarely responds to bug reports.  I'm sure they get far too many across their product lines to make that doable.

                           

                          But it's not true they never fix anything.  Things get fixed all the time.  What get's fixed is most likely prioritized based on the number of users reporting the issue.  And this issue is likely not reported all that much because, as I said, the way you do things isn't the norm, so few users will be running into the issue.

                          • 10. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                            Harm Millaard Community Member

                            Charles,

                             

                            With your background and experience, I think you can understand that a confirmation mail 'We have received your bug report or feature request...' is completely meaningless. Take into consideration that there are many thousands of users and bug reports/feature requests that need to be filtered, that need to be checked whether they can be replicated, whether it is easy to accomplish or takes a major engineering effort, whether it is clear, I mean someone may file a feature request to be able to turn left at the next intersection and another one requests the ability to turn right at the same intersection, whether it makes sense and does not destroy other critical functionality, etc.

                             

                            Like many here, I too have filed numerous feature requests, some of which have been honored in the past, some have not, and I never had any feedback from Adobe on that. I just had to wait for an update/upgrade to appear and see if it was honored or not. Well, that is life with such a complex application and the integration with the other programs in the suite. From Adobe's point-of-view, it is also a matter of resources, effort, time, deadlines, etc. Just take CS6, all programs must be ready at the same date to release the Master Collection at the pre-determined date, EOS. That simply means the development/improvement cycle has to stop at moment X.

                             

                            From my perspective, I rather have Adobe direct its resources at solving bugs that can be replicated, implementing much asked for feature enhancements, than in communicating with users about the status of their bug report or feature request, but hey, that is only my opinion.

                            • 11. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                              Charles Bargar Community Member

                              With your background and experience

                               

                              From my perspective, I rather have Adobe direct its resources at solving bugs that can be replicated

                               

                              My experience (at least where I worked) tells me that program errors are handled with the highest priority.  If the product does not function as advertised, people start looking for one that does.  The last product I worked on ran on almost every major computer platform (Linix, Windows XP->7, Windows Server, SunSolaris, HP, IBM zLinix, IBM OS/400, and IBM z/OS - my ballywick)... talk about keeping products in sync when planning a release!  We still acknowledged a customer bug report within 24 hours, fixed critical errors within  48 hours.  Errors with workarounds took longer, and feature requests were routinely delayed until (at least) the next product release.

                              All bugs had a support issue opened, even if it was not going to be fixed immediately.  Bugs had to be tracked, or they'll never be fixed.  If no support ticket was opened, it probably fell through the cracks.

                               

                              From my perspective:

                               

                              This is a BUG (not to be confused with a feature request) that can be replicated at will.  It was reported the first time almost 2 years (and 2 releases) ago.  I received no confirmation then either, Adobe never opened a support issue, and the error still persists.

                               

                              My test scenario shows exactly how to get the error - simply output an MPG file with multiplexing turned on, and import into Encore.  You don't have to output to BluRay MPG.  All multiplexed MPG's get the same error.  I used BluRay so that the MPG/H.264 results could be compared in a single Encore project.

                              • 12. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                                J. Simon Community Member

                                It would be really nice if Adobe had all bugs corrected within 48 hours.  I don't think any user here would argue with that ideal.

                                 

                                But somehow I doubt that will ever actually occur with software as sophisticated as Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Audition, Encore, etc.

                                • 13. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                                  Charles Bargar Community Member

                                  Read my note again....   Not all bugs were corrected in 48 hrs ...

                                  1. Only the critical errors where a customer could not use the product were corrected in 48 hrs, and those were shipped directly to the customer for verification.  Once in a while a paricularly nasty one took longer, but the customer was consulted.
                                  2. Lower priority problems were usually corrected on the next "point" release - like an Adobe Update. 
                                  3. Features were always delayed until the next major release, which required a new license.

                                  The methodology is similar to your statement about "prioritizing" placement of resources.

                                  • 14. Re: Is Interrupted Conforming REALLY the problem for truncated audio?
                                    J. Simon Community Member

                                    All bugs, critical bugs.  I still have my doubts that you will ever see Adobe patch a program within 48 hours of your bug report.  If it ever happens, I feel pretty safe in saying that you weren't the first to report it, that the process was started long before you reported the bug, and the timing is purely coincidental.

                                     

                                    Again, not arguing against such an ideal scene.  Just not holding out my own hope that it will actually happen.

                                     

                                    Having said that, this is hardly a critical bug.  If you do things the standard way, by your own admission all works just fine.  So...keep pestering Adobe to fix the issue.  But don't hold yourself back from getting the job done until they do.