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      • 120. Re: Please bring back the Fill Light slider!!!
        grandpahenry Community Member

        Actually the problem is shadows on the faces and arms of the subjects caused by a bad choice in location.  The subjects were pretty much facing the sun.  We did not have time to find a better location for these few shots.

         

         

         

        How can I deal with the shadows on the skin of the subject.

         

         

         

        Henry

        • 121. Re: Please bring back the Fill Light slider!!!
          dhphoto2012 Community Member

          grandpahenry wrote:

           

          How can I deal with the shadows on the skin of the subject.

           

          If the shots are really important and worth taking time over I would do two RAW conversions for each, one with correct exposure and one lighter one with the shadows lifted and combine them in PS and then paint in the lighter areas.

          • 122. Re: Please bring back the Fill Light slider!!!
            JimHess CommunityMVP

            I just did the same thing on a series of photos for my daughter's family.  And I simply use the adjustment brush in Lightroom with increased exposure to brush over the faces that have heavy shadows.  In my opinion, it works very well.

            • 123. Re: Please bring back the Fill Light slider!!!
              areohbee Community Member

              Yeah, I think the new basics have taken the spotlight since Lr4 released, but also the local (highlights and) shadows adjustments are awesome for this kind of thing... - maybe toss in some -contrast too. That way you can kill 2 birds with one stone: the same brush will pull the highlights down whilst raising the shadows up...

               

              In Lr3 my most frequently applied brush was -contrast - it was my "highlight recovery" and "shadows" brush (generally mixed with several other things to help target desired tones only...).

               

              Now I frequently brush with -highlights and/or +shadows instead - kinda does the same thing as -contrast, except preserves midtone contrast in the doing. And along with Lightroom's design criteria of keeping high's high and lows, low - these new locals don't generally leave the same washed-out/dull look as -contrast in Lr3 would. Clarity and others can still be mixed in to taste...

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