14 Replies Latest reply: Jun 5, 2012 3:44 PM by JSS1138 RSS

    Digital Cinema Cameras

    JSS1138 Community Member

      The recent announcement of the Blackmagic Digital Cinema Camera is pretty exciting stuff.  For about $7,000 you can get a complete package including camera, zoom lens, stereo microphone and 3 hrs recording media.  That's about the same price as a Panasonic HPX250 with 3 hrs recording time.

       

      And while each camera has it's pros and cons, both share the same con - CMOS imaging.

       

      Now there are two DC cameras slated to be released this year, both using Super16 sized CCDs!  Both record 2k, 12 bit, 4:4:4 CinemaDNG.  Both should have multiple lens mount options. (PL, C, Canon EF, etc.)

       

      The future of uncompromising, yet still affordable, digital cinema is very exciting!

       

      http://www.kineraw.com/kineraw_s16_2.html

       

      http://www.digitalbolex.com/products/bolex-d16/

        • 1. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
          Community Member

          that sounds good jim.... saw this today too...

           

          http://www.usatoday.com/tech/products/story/2012-06-02/reviewed-nikon-d4-review/55330882/1

           

          wish I could get my hands on something to shoot with now...

           

           

          • 2. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
            JSS1138 Community Member

            Eh, I just can't get even a little excited about shooting moving images with a still camera body.  It'll just never be right ergonomically.

            • 3. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
              the_wine_snob Community Member

              Jim,

               

              How can you say that. Look at all the neat stuff that you can hang onto a Canon 5D:

              Canon_Video_Rig.jpg

               

              They even make a large monitor, that clips onto the back, but could not locate an image of that.

               

              Hunt

              • 4. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                John T Smith CommunityMVP

                Geez... that thing looks like it could be in a spy/assassin movie, with a silenced pistol hiding somewhere inside

                • 5. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                  Community Member

                  I like that follow focus on it, and the matte box for filters etc...and would like to see it on a decent camera head instead of hand held rig...

                   

                  most pro movie cameras also have ( if applicable) a zoom motor and more 'stuff' on it...but that is a pretty nice rig for a 'still camera body'.

                   

                  since I dont even have a brownie at the moment anything that shoots would be nice to play with...

                   

                   

                  • 6. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                    Community Member

                    this article is pretty cool... bottom has some red and redcineX info...theres a new redcineX program for windows ( 32 and 64 )...

                     

                    http://www.fxguide.com/featured/the-art-of-digital-color/

                     

                    now I need some red and alexa sample footage...raw for the alexa

                     

                     

                    • 7. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                      JSS1138 Community Member

                      Look at all the neat stuff that you can hang onto a Canon 5D:

                       

                      Yeah, now try holding that thing 3 feet over your head for ten minutes so you can get the well framed, properly focused and perfectly exposed shot of the bride and groom in the middle of the crowded dance floor.

                       

                      DSLRs just aren't practical for event work, and never will be.

                      • 8. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                        SCAPsinger Community Member

                        Jim Simon wrote:

                         

                         

                        DSLRs just aren't practical, and never will be.

                         

                        For weddings, I agree...I've seen some pretty work done on DSLRs for weddings, but there are a lot of things that can go wrong - and a lot of sacrifices - and I've yet to talk with any wedding video guys shooting DSLR who didn't have at least a couple of DSLR-related horror stories. One guy did his first shoot, was recording the ceremony when the camera stopped recording (the well-known 4GB limit on most of these cameras). He didn't know why it happened, so he started recording again, then the camera overheated and he was done for the day before the couple even kissed. That's just a guy not doing his homework, but it's not something that ever happens with "real" camcorders.

                         

                        I take the wedding job very seriously, because it's a religious ceremony that only (sometimes) happens just once. My goal is to capture those kinds of things COMPLETELY so my workflow for that kind of event requires tools that work without issue and can guarantee the fewest number of hoops, because you never know when something crazy will happen during your event and take your focus off your Frankenstein rig, setting you up for a very bad day and a very unhappy Bridezilla.

                         

                        For lots of other shooting - narrative work, for example - the DSLR workflow can be very VERY effective. Practicality is not an issue for a lot of narrative work, where you will jump through 200 hoops to get the exact perfect image. That's obviously part of the focus on event work, but event work is much more constrained by REAL TIME and portability issues.

                         

                        I know a producer who has a 7D, an AF100 and an HVX200, all of which are used for slightly different kinds of work. He would never shoot a wedding on the 7D, and would never use the HVX200 on a narrative (though he did do so 6 years ago with a Redrock lens adapter, a real hassle all in itself).

                        • 9. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                          JSS1138 Community Member

                          I'd agree for production work, DSLRs can be effective.

                           

                          But for event work, where you often have 2, maybe 3 seconds to frame the shot, focus the shot, expose the shot and start the recording or you lose that shot forever, where you often have to go from 2 feet off the ground to well over your head while recording and keeping focus and exposure, the form factor just will never work very well.

                           

                          What I want is a Digital Cinema camera that works just as well for event work, and that means a very specific set of features and ergonomics that DSLR will never fulfill.

                          • 10. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                            the_wine_snob Community Member

                            Jim,

                             

                            Instead of holding your camera over your head, maybe a nice BOOM, and hire Rod to operate it for you. I hear that he's only playing golf in MN, and is looking for dolly-grip work. Heck, depending on what he left NYC with, he might even have one in his "kit."

                            Rod-car.png

                             

                            Hunt

                            • 11. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                              JSS1138 Community Member

                              Boy, I'd look aweful silly dragging that onto a dance floor.

                              • 12. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                                Community Member

                                wow... think of the "reaction" shots you could get of those at the 'event'...

                                 

                                 

                                • 13. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                                  SCAPsinger Community Member

                                  Jim Simon wrote:

                                   

                                  Boy, I'd look aweful silly dragging that onto a dance floor.

                                   

                                  I usually try to drag a pretty lady onto the dance floor with me, distracts people from my silly dancing.

                                   

                                  Oh you're talking about gear? Got it.

                                   

                                  We cover receptions with a Kessler Crane and Steadicam Pilot for the first dance and the other major dances. The crane does usually stay in position for the rest of the evening as well (gives excellent overheads and sweeps, good cutaway material). The Steadicam usually gets tucked away after the first dances until the departure where we cheat death with a combination of backward running shots switched to over-the-shoulder at the end of the getaway switched back around front at the end.

                                   

                                  All told, with our crazy looking gear, we usually get some interesting comments from the guests wanting to know what in the heck we're doing (or rather, if Skynet has become self-aware and we are the first wave of attack).

                                  • 14. Re: Digital Cinema Cameras
                                    JSS1138 Community Member

                                    think of the "reaction" shots you could get

                                     

                                    The one that stands out would be the look on the bride's face, and it ain't pretty.