2 Replies Latest reply on May 12, 2012 5:54 PM by SiúlAmáhain

    Printing the same PSD file on different printers.

    SiúlAmáhain

      I am designing t-shirts in photoshop that will be printed out by a number of employees in different locations, and with different printers. These designs will be printed on special A4 paper and then transferred on to the t-shirts using a heat press. 

       

      But I am worried that I will have issues with "outside of the printable area" type errors on certain printers. I would rather not have use the "crop to fit" option as this will mean I lose quality.. Should I just set a default margin for all of my tshirt tempate psd files? Or is there a better way around this?

       

      thanks in advance.

      J

        • 1. Re: Printing the same PSD file on different printers.
          Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

          If they are employees, then shouldn't they either know, or be trained to set up their own printers?  If you mean 'Fit to page' rather than Crop to page, then that shouldn't lose quality.  From the little I know about heat transfer graphics, I believe they need to be printed at highrt than usual saturation, but that will be part of the image file rather than print properties.  I also believe that some printers have heat transfer as a 'paper type'.  

           

          Sounds to me that you are either going to have to research each person's particular printer, or live with it.

          • 2. Re: Printing the same PSD file on different printers.
            SiúlAmáhain Level 1

            Hi Trevor and thanks for your reply...

             

            My plan was to find out which printer had the smallest printable area, and then design a PSD file for this. But I am having trouble finding the printable areas for each of the printers.. (plus the fact that one of the staff may purchase a new printer some time soon).. Is there a set value of something like 3mm top, bottom,  4mm left, right that would work across all printers.. like a lowest common denominator?