27 Replies Latest reply on Jul 25, 2016 9:37 AM by ryclark

    how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?

    jplew Level 1

      Hi:

       

      am new to Audition so perhaps there is a better way to do this. I need to remove some wind noise and shaking noise in the recorder from an interview I recorded. According to the Pitch Display, all that unwanted noise exists below B1, so I want to delete everything underneath that pitch. Is this possible?

       

      I watched this tutorial, http://tv.adobe.com/watch/audition-feature-tour/spectral-editing-techniques-in-adobe-audit ion-for-the-mac/, but it only shows how to edit audio using the Spectral Frequency Display, not the Spectral Pitch Display.

       

      With the Frequency, I can make a selection using the marquee or lasso tool, but when I switch to the Pitch Display, those tools are grayed out.

       

      Any suggestions? Thanks,

      -JP

        • 1. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
          Paul_Ferguson Level 2

          If you want to dump everything below a specific frequency, use the Parametric Equalizer in Multitrack.  Use the highpass filter and make the slope as steep as you want. 

           

          But for specific instances of bumps and knocks and clicks that the highpass filter doesn't get rid of, use the spot healing brush in the spectral display.  (Mmmm...I haven't checked to see if the spot healing brush is in CS6 or if it's still called the spot healing brush.  This is what I get for doing this at work.  Crossed fingers...)

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
            jplew Level 1

            cool, you just taught me what a high-pass filter is (and low-pass too for that matter).

            And the Spot Healing Brush is still called just that. It works great.

            Thanks for the really useful answer!

            • 3. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
              ryclark Level 5

              By the way the Spectral Pitch display is meant for manual pitch shifting. Other tools probably don't work on that display.

              • 4. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                _durin_ Adobe Employee

                ryclark wrote:

                 

                By the way the Spectral Pitch display is meant for manual pitch shifting. Other tools probably don't work on that display.

                 

                Yep.  For this particular use case, apart from the already recommended Parametric EQ high-pass filter, I'd recommend using the marquee selection tool and select everything below approx. 62Hz.  (B1 corresponds to 61.75Hz)  Then either hit DEL to completely obliterate it, or use the on-screen HUD volume knob to reduce its amplitude.

                • 5. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                  jplew Level 1
                  I'd recommend using the marquee selection tool and select everything below approx. 62Hz.  (B1 corresponds to 61.75Hz)  Then either hit DEL to completely obliterate it, or use the on-screen HUD volume knob to reduce its amplitude.

                   

                   

                  ok, while I have your expert attention, is there any way to feather the selection, like in Photoshop? I don't want the 'edges' to be too sharp. Thanks.

                  • 6. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                    ryclark Level 5

                    I think you will find that in audio frequency terms there is a certain amount of "feathering" due to the way the Delete works in Spectral view. However if you want a more gradual roll off go back to using the High Pass filter where you can alter the slope to get a gentler effect. You can use the marquee tool as suggested by Durin to select a portion of the audio and then use the Filter instead of Delete. You can try both using Undo and see the difference in the Spectral view. But in the end it will be your ears that tell you how much you can get away with.

                    • 7. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                      jplew Level 1

                      ryclark, that is very helpful, thanks.

                       

                      Another question then is I want to create a "valley" in my audio between two points. In other words I want to fade a section out, then fade another in. I discovered I can do this from the Multitrack mode by using the mixer or dragging a keyframe down, but can I also do this from the Waveform section or the Spectral Frequency Display?

                       

                      Using the "Fade In" and "Fade Out" filters feels a little cumbersome because I have to select from point A to my halfway point, apply Fade Out filter, then select from halfway point to point B and apply Fade In. Is there a better way to do this?

                      Thanks.

                      • 8. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                        ryclark Level 5

                        You need the Gain Envelope effect from Effects/Amplitude and Compression. Opening the effect will put an envelope line on your wavform where you can draw your "dip".

                        1 person found this helpful
                        • 9. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                          jplew Level 1

                          cool, that works great.

                           

                          I'm quite impressed with Audition, I might start scoring all my video in here from now on. I find myself going back and forth between Premiere and Audition all the time to modify individual clips. Maybe I should just finish my edit, then export all the raw, unprocessed audio into Audition. I imagine there's a way to get Premiere to export each of my audio tracks (music, b-roll audio, interviews/narration), as a separate file, then import those in Audition as a multitrack project. I will keep playing around.

                           

                          Thanks for all the help, you guys are great.

                          • 10. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                            _durin_ Adobe Employee

                            jplew -

                             

                            Look under Edit > Edit in Adobe Audition > Sequence...  You can send all or part of your active Premiere sequence to Audition.  Premiere will render a reference video, create new clips with handles, and maintain track layout consistency.  When you've mixed and finished your audio in Audition, you can send rendered stems or a complete mixdown of your audio back to Premiere using Multitrack > Export to Adobe Premiere Pro...

                            • 11. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                              Paul_Ferguson Level 2

                              Durin, I'm just getting into video.  I'm using Power Director 9 at the moment, and wondering how to go about edits and cuts and keep the audio and video in synch.  Would it be easier in any significant way to be using Elements instead of PD?  (I figure it makes as much sense to ask you as to go to the Premiere forum and ask there.)

                              • 12. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                jplew Level 1

                                thanks durin, am trying it now.

                                • 13. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                  ryclark Level 5

                                  @ therealdobro

                                   

                                  The linking between Audition and Premiere only works with Premiere Pro, not, unfortunately, with Premiere Elements. So stick with what you know, do your video edit first and then export a video with audio in a format suitable to import into Audition. Then you can work on the audio against the picture and use the original audio track as a guide for checking the sync against. So save it safely and don't overwrite it what ever you do.

                                  • 14. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                    Paul_Ferguson Level 2

                                    ryclark wrote:

                                     

                                    @ therealdobro

                                     

                                    The linking between Audition and Premiere only works with Premiere Pro, not, unfortunately, with Premiere Elements. So stick with what you know, do your video edit first and then export a video with audio in a format suitable to import into Audition. Then you can work on the audio against the picture and use the original audio track as a guide for checking the sync against. So save it safely and don't overwrite it what ever you do.

                                    Thanks, that's good to know, but can I ask you another question?  Here's what I've done: recorded sixty minutes of me playing and singing in both audio and video.  It's going to be edited down to about 40 minutes of material, so there will be cuts and joins.  I'm going to overdub a bunch of parts over the audio tracks - bass, keyboard, percussion, backing vocals - the whole nine yards.  Should I finish the audio portion of the project first, before I get into editing the video?  Or can I proceed with the video edits like you suggest and then bring them into Audition to synch up with the overdubbed parts?  I have no idea how to go about any of this except for the audio bits - Audition 6 is lovely.

                                     

                                    jplew - I apologise for detouring this thread.  I hope both topics can co-exist happily in the same thread.

                                    • 15. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                      ryclark Level 5

                                      It is really best to more or less complete your video edit before dubbing the audio. This doesn't preclude you tweaking the video subsequently but you will, of course, need to revisit the audio in Audition to resync against any picture alterations.

                                      • 16. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                        jplew Level 1

                                        jplew - I apologise for detouring this thread.  I hope both topics can co-exist happily in the same thread.

                                        no problem, I already detoured the thread long ago and so far the mods don't seem to mind. I got my answers so everything else is bonus education. And if I ever learn to play and sing like you someday...this might come in handy.

                                        • 17. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                          Paul_Ferguson Level 2

                                          ryclark wrote:

                                           

                                          It is really best to more or less complete your video edit before dubbing the audio. This doesn't preclude you tweaking the video subsequently but you will, of course, need to revisit the audio in Audition to resync against any picture alterations.

                                          Sorry, but I have to ask: Why?

                                          • 18. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                            ryclark Level 5

                                            Well it depends whether you revisit the edit after you have you have re-encoded the video and dubbed audio together, in which case you would start a new video editing session with the new video files. Or, as I was envisaging, you go back to your original video edit session and tweaking the pictures there which could cause your separate audio track to go out of sync.

                                            • 19. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                              Paul_Ferguson Level 2

                                              ryclark wrote:

                                               

                                              Well it depends whether you revisit the edit after you have you have re-encoded the video and dubbed audio together, in which case you would start a new video editing session with the new video files. Or, as I was envisaging, you go back to your original video edit session and tweaking the pictures there which could cause your separate audio track to go out of sync.

                                              You know, I think you're right.  I think, because it's a video I'm making, I have to choose the visuals I want first and then slave the rest of the project to that. 

                                               

                                              So:

                                               

                                              1 do the video cuts and edits with the first audio tracks synched to that

                                               

                                              2 do the audio overdubs independent of the video

                                               

                                              3 bring the overdubs into the project and try to align them with the first audio tracks

                                               

                                              Make sense?

                                              • 20. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                ryclark Level 5

                                                If you bring an exported audio from your edited video into Audition on one track you can do your overdubs in sync with that. Then mix down your newly overdubbed multitrack session in Audition, with the original audio muted if you don't want it in the final mix. When you take that Mixed audio file back into your video edit session it should all still be in sync with the pictures.

                                                • 21. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                  Paul_Ferguson Level 2

                                                  Okay, thanks for holding my hand.  I think I can see it now. 

                                                  • 22. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                    HarleyTDavis Level 1

                                                    I have a similar problem, but I have an electrical engineer for a dad!  So here's a few questions.  Is the Amplitude (Volume) of the audio from your background higher or Lower than the rest?  Theres an old trick my dad used back at the office (Hughes Aircraft RADAR division) that might help.  With signals that can be filled with extraneous noise, it's tempting to apply attenuation-frequency adjustment.  However, in many cases, you can do a double blind pass through to calculate your signal at its best, without losing so much, or distorting your information.  What this means is that you pass the signal back out, through another input that attenuates it down by a set amount (the whole signal), until the signal barely comes through.  Swap the phase and pass it back into a bus and combine it with your original signal.  When you can calculate (at least reasonably close) the values you want to keep, you can continually remove your higher amplitudes very quickly (according to dad, you used secondary output a few hundred to a few thousand times, along with 2 separate busses that handled phasing the output, and several units that passed the output through with a transistor or switch step timer to clean a signal, and it took from 1 to 10 seconds to clean up; now the same system takes even less time to run scans several thousand times a second along with a heat and a light value scan); at the end swap the phase so that it removes your lower amplitudes, and be left with only those amplitudes you want.  Basically, you can attenuate out your "dirty" audio.  How much time you got?  Try this...

                                                     

                                                    PROFESSIONAL AUDIO CLEANING REQUIRES TIME AND EFFORT!

                                                    What you'll need:

                                                    ------A big enough\Fast Enough hard drive  (20min of 96k audio at 24bits is HUGE), best to use esata or faster drive at 60gigs or more, and delete the less useful files as you go.

                                                    ------an I\o box to connect inputs to Audition  (I use a Behringer FCA610 for this, and run it a few times; occasionally I use my M-audio fastback usb to add two more i\o, and stay away from optical or coax.  Their properties do in fact have an effect on your output.

                                                    Plenty of coffee.

                                                     

                                                    Make several busses, Call them BOOSTER #, I'd make about 6 to 20 of them, feeding each one to a specific output on your I\O box, with a normal audio track beneath each one that takes it's input from an input plugged with the output from the bus, feed this audio track to the next bus and so on.  Set each to +db and feed the output to the next one.  When you get to the end leave the output set to none.  That last part is really important.  Mute the 9th bus, i'll tell you why in a moment.  Now make several more busses, call them all DROP# where # is 1 to the number of outputs your Input\output device has (We are passing output directly to inputs, so the total number of inputs will do;  On mac, you can connect several boxes as one AGGREGATE device, and as long as they can share a clock, they should be able to work together, but this means you have to step the clock down 1 step below the maximum of your worst box has).  Each of these outputs can be another pass to drop your signal.  For each of these busses, create a track below it called the same name, feed the bus to the output number that matches it, and on the track, grab the input you connect the output to for it's input, and set it to the next output for it's output.  Set each output bus to -6db.  Once again, you'll find out why soon enough.  Keep your i\o box knobs to zero, this is important.  We only want the software to control the attenuation of signal.  Make sure you save your default stereo output for headphones, but don't plug them in just yet.  Hopefully you haven't plugged anything to anything just yet.  This is just the cleanup tracks.  We'll be using these again and again.  You may want to export the session as a template for later use.

                                                     

                                                    The principle used here is essentially an electrical zeroing of useless SIGNAL, with a BOOSTING to useful signal at the end AVOIDING ENTERING NOISE.  +6 db is the logarithmic doubling of signal, and -6 cuts it by half; +10 DB multiplies it by 1000 times, and -10 divides it.  The other values like 5 and 3 are useless, they don't do a .5 or quartering... ...You have to do that by mixing several signals and phasing one or two just right.  6 ads enough signal without inaccuracy, and 10 can add some distortion in the +10 mode, so we'll stick with 6 here.  After all, you can phase your audio in and out all you want.  There's only one more thing to talk about.  Latency.  When you combine signals in this manner, you're passing them into and out of your computer, and it can take time to write those bits.  You may end up with audio that doesn't match up perfectly to the millisecond.  The best way to combat latency is to set your capture samples at 32 under audio Hardware.  This is low latency mode.  Your computer might not handle it well if you have too many in\outs.  I'm not sure about the latest CC, I use CS6.  I don't know if they've added the compensation feature or not.  That's why I've used busses.  In Apple Logic Pro-x, you assign an output, but it will compensate if you turn that feature on.  You'll have to assign busses directly to outputs, so you have fewer tracks to deal with to get what you want, but you also have to record each track as if you're recording it for the first time in order to save it (you save a ton of files in this instance), but you're really just playing it back again.  In adobe, I can take a guess at what will do it, put my tracks in and Export the MIXDOWN to a file, Selecting only the busses I want to start with!  This saves time and space.

                                                     

                                                    We don't need our headphones just yet, but you may want to get an oscillator or another signal device for the end of your output chain, something with high resolution that can detect extremely low signal, or you may want to create another 2 busses, call the first HPBooster, and the second ZeroBus--now on HPBooster, set up to 5 sends, set them all to ZeroBus with a +10 db raise, but turn on only 1 and set the outputs for HPBooster and all its sends to ZeroBus, set the sends pre fader, set ZeroBus to output to none for the moment.  Save.  You may want to export session again to update.

                                                     

                                                    You'll want to make an audio track that can hold your audio file in it's native mode (stereo or mono), set its input to NONE, Call it Original.  Make a second Track, call it PHASED DROP.  Leave it empty and muted, Swap the phase, input/output doesn't matter right now, but input should be none, and out should be to another bus called CLEAN AUDIO.  You can make a track to save the file immediately, but you can do it with an export session operation and drop the bus to a file.  Put a Compressor on this, we will be attenuating the low values down (your garbage will disappear), but leave the effect off for now.  Export the session to a template to update it, use the same name to overwrite.

                                                    The basics are done.

                                                    You'll need to see your highest peak value of your good audio, and calculate the distance between that and the highest peak (roughly) of your garbage.  Write it down in DB, or use how many blocks and calculate from the known points.

                                                    Insert your audio file onto the "Original" Track, and send it's output to the OUTPUT Drop Bus (the first one).  Now think about how large your highest amplitude is.  -12db is considered a ZERO base for most devices.  You may want to bring your audio up to that before we begin, but if you have to add 6db or more, don't do it.  It really matters very little.

                                                    Let's start by going through the full experiment.  Set each OUTPUT DROP audio track to be in RECORD mode.  Highlight the entire area of your Audio file, and press Record.  Another advantage Audition has over LOGIC is that you can precisely record in this fashion to clean your audio.  Once Finished, you'll have more files to check.  This is where your headphones and Oscillator may come in handy.  You'll have to play back each file, and assess it's output level.  At a certain point, the level of your Garbage audio won't be representable anymore.  The downside here is that you may start to lose some of your good audio too.  This is where PHASING can help.  Unfortunately, at levels so low, you can't even hear the audio.  So I'd go ahead and point each one in turn (starting with your lowest) into your HPBooster, and see what you get.  If you start to loose your "Good audio" in one file, and the one above has it, you can run this whole process in another Session file using the template and the file that still has good audio, and the file that loses it.  Put them both into the Original (good) and PHASED(LostGood) audio tracks, and point the bus to your HPBooster set to the number of sends you'll need to be able to hear it slightly with your knobs down.  Slowly turn the knob up until you can hear it.  Ask if there's enough there worth rescuing.  If so, export the mix down, export the ZEROBUS only, Call it StartCleanPhased-filename-good-bad, where filename is the name of your final file.  Now save the session, you'll need it again.  How close does any garbage get to your good audio?  If it intrudes a little, you'll probably lose a little, which doesn't hurt if it's so small.  We outputted the bus for a reference.  We'll do it again in a minute.  Remember the Compressor?  try to calculate the top end of your garbage, and set the threshold to that value, then set the boost to -100db or lower, set the attack to 10ms, the release to 90-1000ms, and the ratio to 1, and listen to it live.  Adjust the threshold up as your garbage appears, even if it goes slightly into your good audio.  You'll lose so little here it's not even funny.  This is called the REVERSE COMPRESSOR or EXPANDER.  It Should leave your good audio at a good level while dropping your garbage to nothing.  If it distorts, drop the threshold a little, and set your main DB gain to -30 to start, going slowly lower until you get closer to the desired effect.

                                                    Now we want to Mixdown the bus again, but at the same level as the starting files.  We'll fix the level in a moment.  For now, just export the bus.  This will render another file, name it CLEANEDPhased-filename-GoodOnly.  Now replace the files on ORIGINAL and PHASED with the two files you just created, and turn off the compressor.  Point both outputs directly to ZEROBUS.  DON'T USE THE BOOSTER FOR THESE.  You should only hear the garbage audio.  THIS IS THE CORRECT FUNCTION.  Don't worry.  Phasing is your friend.  First, set all the sends in your HPBooster to -10db that you turned on before, and set the main output to -10db for that bus.  Point your two audio tracks to HPBooster.   Now output this file, name it PHASECLEANED Garbage-Only-filename-Dropped.  Remember the file that had good and bad audio?  We'll need that in a second, so find it.  It should have a name like StartCleanPhased-filename-good-bad.wav  and you'll find it wherever you saved it (I usually prefer to save them to the REDORDED folder like the rest of the audio).  Now... ...Put that StartCleanPhased-filename-good-bad file into the ORIGINAL track, and but your PHASECLEANED Garbage-filename-Dropped file into the PHASED track, replacing whatever is there.  Reset your HPBooster with the +10 values, dropping one of the sends (turn it off).  You should only hear your clean audio.  Check this carefully.  Now we make a change.  We've got an estimated clean audio, but we can't be perfectly sure.  Point both audio Tracks (Original and PHASED) to the first BOOSTER bus, and set this up for however many output busses you originally used, pointing each bus at the next bus until the last one.  Point this one at your ZEROBUS.  Output this file too, call it CLEAN-ESTIMATE-NORMALLED.  It will be at the same general level as your original audio.  What we want to do is open the original session, put the CLEAN-ESTIMATE-NORMALLED file into the PHASED track, turn off the mute button, point both tracks to the ZEROBUS.  This should give you only GARBAGE again.  But play it through in your soft areas, as these can play tricks with you.  You may get some good audio falling into this.  You can combat this.  Again  Save your garbage file...  Put it into the PHASED track, it will be pulled out of your audio.  To pull some good audio back in, just start pushing the PHASED track fader down.  Every 1db you drop brings back 2db of your garbage volume.  You can also use spectral analysis on your garbage file, clear those finer good values only, and then phase the garbage file out of your original audio.  Output the final file through your ZeroBus.

                                                     

                                                    Where are my Audio Buds?  You all out there or what?  If you'd like, I'll build a session template later, but I don't know where I could post it at the moment.  I'd love to make an action that recorded every audio track then played a section of each one for about 10s, as you follow the process.  It would require you to make a marker to record with more than likely.  Then just give it a file, and let it work.  By the end, you'd have your original file cleaned after you select the best candidates for cleaning, and continue on.  Anybody know how to program any of this for CC plugin?

                                                    • 24. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                      ryclark Level 5

                                                      What has the previous post but one got to do with Spectral Display editing on a 4 year old thread???????

                                                      • 25. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                        Bob Howes Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                        I agree with Steve's response but actually skimmed through it.

                                                         

                                                        It actually contains some pretty bad advice for working with the tools Audition provides, over complicating a lot of things that are actually easy to do.

                                                        • 26. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                          SteveG(AudioMasters) Level 6

                                                          Bob Howes wrote:

                                                           

                                                          It actually contains some pretty bad advice for working with the tools Audition provides, over complicating a lot of things that are actually easy to do.

                                                          That doesn't surprise me - but I really DNR!

                                                          • 27. Re: how to edit using Spectral Pitch Display?
                                                            ryclark Level 5

                                                            I thought that you were suggesting Dynamic Noise Reduction. But perhaps it is needed in this thread rather than Audition.