7 Replies Latest reply on May 28, 2012 11:26 AM by sewillia

    Creating a high class effect with food

    sewillia

      Hi there, my apologies if this is the wrong place to ask questions like this but I like a food graphic found at the www.le28thiers.fr homepage and would like to use that effect with other foods like pastries and cakes. I'd also like to reflecate the lighting effect in the 'room'. Can anyone tell me how I can do this?

      Thanks for your time.

        • 1. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
          MikeKPhoto Level 2

          Lots of techniques at play here, but the primary technique to this effect is the lighting for the setup. Looking at some of the other images, it could be a composite of a number of images, the reuse of the ice cubes is a good example or it could be the cubes were extracted from the main iamge. But my guess this is a multiple composite image, radial gradient layer for the red background Sperate layers for the logo and text. Patterned layer for the top of the background.

           

          Very nicely done....

          • 2. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
            sewillia Level 1

            Thanks for responding MikeKPhoto. Do you think the lime, orange, and olive foods were made from scratch in photoshop or takes from a photo image then manipulated to look like the graphic at that site?  If a photo was manipulated I wonder what filter could cause such a flawless result.

            • 3. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
              Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

              One of the best photography resources on the web are the http://www.studiolighting.net/ podcast archives. Nearly a hundred half hour interviews with some of the best professional photographers out there. I have learned some real gems of information from them (I generally put them on a pen-drive and listen to them in the car).

               

              http://www.studiolighting.net/lightsource-podcast-archives/

               

              Check out #53 with Lou Manna

              http://www.studiolighting.net/lightsource-photography-podcast-e053-lou-manna/

               

              But to summarise, Lou says that food is generally lit from above and behind using a large light source, and that appears to be how your example shot was lit.

              • 4. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
                MikeKPhoto Level 2

                My guess is they are real fruit with generous use of the clone tool and healing brush, the artist did indeed outdo mother nature for such flawless fruit

                • 5. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  It's a composite image, multiple exposures shot with the light coming from different directions. The olives are lit from behind and front-right, the lime front left, the glass back left and probably a reflector at right, and so on. Then the different exposures are put together and blended. Probably one or two large soft-boxes, and reflectors.

                   

                  But the setup itself is just too much work to put together later, with all the transparency and reflectance, so that's probably real (but brushed up).

                   

                  Beautifully done, an expert at work.

                  • 6. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
                    Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

                    I live in Marlborough New Zealand, where the wine comes from, but we are also famous for olives and seafood (mussels and salmon). Nearly all of my commercial work is for the local wine and food industry, and I promise you that there is usually very little retouching required for something like a bowl of olives. If you have thousands of the things to choose from, you are going to cherry pick the best ones. One the other hand, I do a lot of bottle shots, and they do need a lot of retouching. I usually use a Canon 100mm macro lens on a 1DsMK3, and the results are _very_ sharp, and every tiny flaw becomes obvious.

                     

                    Wine bottles tend to have screw tops nowadays, but the beer bottles I do have the old fashioned tops.  The black tops always get damaged in the bottling process, and take some fixing up.   That is done with a mixture of hand painting and the smudge tool, together with some temporary masking (in the way that an airbrush artist uses masks).

                     

                    Hopwired Fresh.jpg

                    • 7. Re: Creating a high class effect with food
                      sewillia Level 1

                      Thanks everyone for your responses. It seems that I will need to start with actual foods that are photographed with strategic light positions and then take these into photoshop for postprocessing. I would appreciate any suggestions anyone can give on that process.