6 Replies Latest reply on May 29, 2012 4:55 PM by the_wine_snob

    How to make an opening eye effect

    ashimashi25

      Hi there,


      I am trying to make the effect as if the person's eyes is closed and it is opening. So maybe something like curves around the screen which get smaller until they are gone which gives the effect the eyes of the person are opening. The video I am working on is in first person view. The camera is the eyes of the person.

       

      Also, I wanted to check if I can open my premiere elements 7 file to adobe premiere CS4. I have it on another computer and wouldn't mind being able to transfer to that because of the better features and tools it offers.

       


      Thanks

        • 1. Re: How to make an opening eye effect
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          The exact mechanics will depend on whether you want one eye, or the view of both eyes. However, other than the mechanics, it should be similar. I would create the image, that will be used as a matte, in Photoshop, or PSElements, and create slits (for the eyes). In my examply, I created a 2000 x 1500 pixel New Image, with a Transparent Background. Then I added a Solid Color Adjustment Layer, making that black. I created two ellipses, for the "squinted eyes," and just did a Delete, to knock the Solid Color Adjustment Layer to Transparent. The exact size, degree of ellipse and placement will be up to you. I Saved_As PSD, to maintain the Transparency. I then Imported the PSD, and dragged it to the Video Track above my Video - in my case, Video Track 2. Now the fun begins. You will Keyframe the Fixed Effect>Motion>Scale (but uncheck Constrain Proportions, so that you can adjust Scale>Height and Scale>Width independently). Decrease the Scale>Height, at the first Keyframe, to a tight squint. This is why I started with a Still Image, larger than the Frame Size of my Project and my Video. Here, I added a Dip-to-Black Transition, to start with black, then fade into the squint. As time progresses, I added Keyframes for Scale>Height, and at a point, also added Scale>Width Keyframes, adjusting that up, as well. When I had the "look" that I wanted, I went back and added Effect>Gaussian Blur to the PSD, and kept its setting pretty low, to soften the edges of the eyes.Experiment, experiment. If you need to work with two versions of the PSD, you can create them the same way, perhaps starting with even tighter ellipses, for PSD_01, then taller ones for PSD_02 (and maybe 03, etc., then just put a Cross-Dissolve between those. Note: you will want to Keyframe the "next" PSD to be close to the preceeding one.

           

          Here is a look at the PSD:

           

          Eyes_PSD.png

          Good luck, and hope that helps,

           

          Hunt

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: How to make an opening eye effect
            nealeh Level 5

            Keyframing will do the first. CS4 may well open your PRE7 project, try it and see. But work on a copy of the PRE7 project - once you save, from CS4, PRE7 will not then be able to open it.

             

            Cheers,
            --
            Neale
            Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: How to make an opening eye effect
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              For a look at a quick version of this, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLeG7grDmUM

               

              Hunt

              • 4. Re: How to make an opening eye effect
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                I agree with Neale - it might, or might not.

                 

                I have had good luck with PrE 3 & 4 Projects (PREL) files in PrPro CS 2.0, but it would not Open PrE 7, 8, 9 or 10 Projects. PrPro CS4 would open 7, 8 and 9. I have not tried any PREL's in later versions. It seems that the greatest success is when the versions of PrE and PrPro are contemporaries of each other.

                 

                Note: these were all simple Projects with no 3rd party Effects or Transitions, and no Instant Movies/Themes. PrPro does not have the same 3rd party Effects, or Transitions, that PrE does, and does not have Instant Movies/Themes. Those might kill the process, or yield errors.

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: How to make an opening eye effect
                  ashimashi25 Level 1

                  Thanks for the quick replies!


                  I guess I will just stick with Adobe Premiere Elements for now.

                   

                  As for the effect, I might have misexplained it. I found this video on youtube of what I meant by first person view: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWYrGWsGCn4

                   

                  It is a bad example but shows how the camera will be moving and acting like the eyes of the person. There is a point in the video where the person's vision gets blurry and he closes his eyes then opens them in a different spot. I want it to look releastic like the person is actually opening his/her eyes. I am not sure what can be done to make it seem releastic. I was thinking maybe showing the eyelids or eyelashes while opening the eyes will give it a good effect.

                   

                  I was hopning to show an example, but I sadly can't find anything on youtube. Let me know if anyone has any ideas on how to make this seem better.

                   

                  Thanks,


                  Ashkan

                  • 6. Re: How to make an opening eye effect
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    OK, you could still do similar, but much more quickly, and also with the eyelashes (I would still use the Blur, though maybe less, or even have the POV subject focus from a blurry background, then quickly to their eyelashes in better focus, then to a sharper background. Just do larger "eye holes," and Keyframe much more quickly, than I did. A human "blink" is about 1/30th of a sec., or one Frame. If the subject, the POV, has been hit in the head, their blinks might be slower, but you will still be doing things much more rapidly, than my example. In general, the mechanics are the same, but with some significant changes.

                     

                    Good luck,

                     

                    Hunt