10 Replies Latest reply on Jun 8, 2012 1:53 PM by station_two

    RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it

    Apple Custard Studios

      In photoshop cs5 when i convert an image i am working on from RGB to CMYK i get a white glaze over the image? as if i have added a photo filter or something? do you know how to prevent this on a mac computer?

        • 1. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
          Level 5

          Does this happen if you create a new user on your Mac and try it through that account?

           

          Can you share an example? (use the camera icon on the toolbar of the forum post editor)

          • 2. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
            Apple Custard Studios Level 1

            Well i have never thought of doing it that way, but to also let you know it happens when i turn the image into a jpeg file, so it looks ok when i am in photoshop, but when i come to saving it, so firstly changing it to cmyk and then saving it as a jpeg file, when i open it up as a jpeg, thats when the problem shows.  I will upload a before and after for you.white before.pngwhite after.png

            • 3. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
              Level 7

              You're saving a CMYK JPEG - and many applications outside of Photoshop can't handle CMYK JPEG correctly (especially browsers).

              If you need to save JPEG, you should probably stick with RGB.

              • 4. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                Level 5

                Chris Cox wrote:

                 

                ...If you need to save JPEG, you should probably stick with RGB.

                Maybe someone should engineer a special "save for web" function under the main menu that makes sure that a JPG is saved correctly.

                 

                Get on it Chris! 

                 

                I suppose that the 'white glaze' is simply the smaller gamut of CMYK color.

                • 5. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                  Apple Custard Studios Level 1

                  Hi Chris

                   

                  thanks for your response, the only problem i have is, that it was originally an RGB file and intended just for web, but then the final image needed to be used for print, hence

                  me trying to convert it cmyk, but surely there must be away if this issue arises, instead of starting from scratch in cmyk mode?

                  • 6. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                    Level 7

                    Unless you use applications that can render CMYK JPEGs correctly, no, there is no easy way to avoid it.

                    If you save a CMYK JPEG, many apps are not going to display it correctly.

                    • 7. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                      Level 5

                      Inexplicably, the image you posted has a device-dependent "Display" profile embedded.

                       

                      Converting it to sRGB and setting the black and white points via a quick Auto Levels adjustment, brings about an improvement.

                       

                      white+after_opt.jpg

                       

                      Re the embedded "Display" profile in the original image you posted, you wouldn't happen to have your monitor profile set up as your Photoshop working space by any chance, would you?  Because if you were, then you'd be flying blind and without instruments. 

                      • 8. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                        Level 5

                        Incidentally, your "before" image link is broken and, therefore, the image is not visible to us forum users.

                        • 9. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                          Apple Custard Studios Level 1

                          Hi station_two

                           

                          yes i can see that it is broke, but if you look in your last post the before image is in there for some reason, and the after picture is at the top in the earlier discussions.  When i conver from rgb

                          to cmyk, i SIMPLY GO: Image > mode> then click cmyk?  I dont no if this is some type of primitive way i am doing it, also after i do it, this warning sign appears, which i am unsure it it may mean

                          i have wrong profiles set, but if so what would i need to change it to?Screen shot 2012-06-07 at 10.49.16.png

                          • 10. Re: RGB  to CMYK gives me a white glaze? how to get rid of it
                            Level 5

                            Apple Custard Studios wrote:

                             

                            …yes i can see that it is broke, but if you look in your last post the before image is in there for some reason, and the after picture is at the top in the earlier discussions. 

                             

                            Sorry, I don't understand what you're trying to say here.    How can the "before" image be in any post of mine if I have never been able to see it?

                             

                             

                            The image I posted in my post, was your "after" image CORRECTED by me as explained in that post:

                            "Converting it to sRGB and setting the black and white points via a quick Auto Levels adjustment, brings about an improvement."

                             

                            In other words, I downloaded your "after" image, opened in Photoshop, went to the Edit menu and used Convert To Profile to convert it to the sRGB color space, then I ran and Auto Levels adjustment.  That's how I fixed your mess. 

                             

                             

                             

                            Apple Custard Studios wrote:

                             

                            Hi station_two

                             

                            …When i convert from rgb to cmyk, i SIMPLY GO: Image > mode> then click cmyk?…

                             

                            Geebus Chrysler!  No, that is indeed not just "primitive" but totally wrong.  Go to the CONVERT TO PROFILE menu item in the Edit menu in Photoshop, and from that menu select the specific CMYK profile you want (or your printer requests).  Be careful to select CONVERT TO PROFILE, do not under any circumstances choose "Assign Profile"!  Converting to the appropriate CMYK profile will also automatically change the image mode to CMYK mode.

                             

                             

                             

                            Apple Custard Studios wrote:

                             

                            …which i am unsure it it may mean i have wrong profiles set, but if so what would i need to change it to?…

                             

                             

                            Apple Custard, it's obvious that you have no clue as to what Color Management is, and teaching you Color Management step by step here exceeds the scope of what can be accomplished in a forum.  A good place to start reading up on it is here:

                             

                            http://www.gballard.net/psd/cmstheory.html 

                             

                            In a nutshell:  Your Monitor profile should be the file resulting from your calibrating and profiling your monitor with a hardware calibrator puck.  Calibrate and profile your monitor regularly and often.  Your monitor profile thus will be device-dependent, specific to your monitor.

                             

                            Your working space, on the other hand, should be a device-independent profile, such as Adobe RGB or sRGB.  It should NEVER, ever be your monitor profile.

                             

                            Your target profile when printing should be device-dependent and specific to the combination of ink, paper and printer model you'll be using.  For the web, create a copy of your image file and convert it to sRGB, then save it as a JPEG as needed.

                             

                            Good luck!