3 Replies Latest reply: Jun 14, 2012 4:50 PM by Noel Carboni RSS

    Is Hot Pixel Reduction Still Happening in Camera Raw?

    Noel Carboni Community Member

      Seems to me that in past versions of Camera Raw I was seeing pretty effective hot pixel removal.  Is that still in the converter?

       

      I was just processing some high ISO night shots and it sure seems to me that I see more hot pixels in the dark places than I used to in conversions.  But it could just be these images and the settings I am using bringing them out.

       

      -Noel

        • 1. Re: Is Hot Pixel Reduction Still Happening in Camera Raw?
          Community Member

          Naturally, you'll want more authoritative confirmation  , but the two comments I would have are that (1) I have no reason to believe that hot pixel mapping has been discontinued in ACR and (2) I see no evidence of that in my current images processed by ACR 7.1.

           

          Of course, if you still have older versions of Ps/ACR installed, you can compare one of your current files, converted to DNG if necessary, processed in ACR 7.x and earlier versions.

          • 2. Re: Is Hot Pixel Reduction Still Happening in Camera Raw?
            ssprengel CommunityMVP

            I have a single red hot pixel almost in the center of my sensor that I can see at ISO 100 and ACR 7.1 removes this, still.

            • 3. Re: Is Hot Pixel Reduction Still Happening in Camera Raw?
              Noel Carboni Community Member

              Thanks, guys.  I think all is well.  The egregious hot pixels are being handled.

               

              I just did some very careful comparitive conversions going all the way back to Photoshop CS3.

               

              In the change between Photoshop CS3 and CS4 (ACR 4.6 and 5.7) there is a definite difference in the hot pixel handling, with more hot pixels showing in conversions from the latter.  Notably the detail level in conversions seemed to go up markedly at that time as well.

               

              However, it became clear to me that the reason I was seeing more hot pixels than I thought I should was that I was actually pushing the exposure up on high ISO night shots already, bringing out more noise than would be seen at default exposure levels.  In fact, without such enhancement the remaining hot pixels are essentially invisible.

               

              Here's a small portion of the same "boat parade" raw file converted with all these different versions, noise reduction completely off, and enhanced in brightness well beyond the levels I normally do just for illustrative purposes.

               

              HotPixelComparison.jpg

               

              -Noel