8 Replies Latest reply on Jun 20, 2012 7:27 AM by Jim Curtis

    Rendering Files - File size help!

    hauxen

      Hi there,

       

      I'm an IT Technician at a school where some of the students have started to use Adobe Premier Pro CS 5. When creating their videos it's creating multiple rendered .avi files e.g. Rendered - ccc2a75b-7d23-4392-a2cb-535c465282b6.avi

       

      The files are around 50-100mb and as you can imagine, when a class of 30 is doing the above it's taking up some hefty space! Is there some way we can reduce this or perhaps remove the rendering of files?


      Thanks

        • 1. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          Tell them not to render their timelines (they will not be happy) or get more storage.

          • 2. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Rendering is to provide the smoothest playback. Sometimes, it is required to clearly see aspects, such as Keyframed Effects, but often is not really needed. This ARTICLE goes into more detail.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
              Shadreck Rukweza Level 2

              Another option for this is to use external harddrive which students can borrow when they want to do their video projects. It is the best way  because at the end of each term you will format the harddrive and ensure that everything has been deleted. I think external hard drive offers better playback perfomance than the network drive, thats why students have to render to get real time playback. My University used this method because we had lots of dropped frames on iMacs using FCP and Premiere Pro CS3 with DV footage. In the end they had lots of external usb and firewire 400/800 to use as scratch disk and everything was super. Even when using the editing suites with Mac Pros, you simply have to use an external HDD to enjoy realtime playback.

              • 4. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
                Harm Millaard Level 7

                Keep in mind the following rough estimates of sustained transfer rates with different connections:

                 

                • USB2: around 20-25 MB/s
                • FW400: around 30 - 35 MB/s
                • FW800:around 50 - 60 MB.s
                • USB3: around 65- 75 MB/s
                • eSATA: around 120 - 140 MB/s

                 

                assuming modern disks.

                • 5. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
                  Shadreck Rukweza Level 2

                  Harm Millaard wrote:

                   

                  Keep in mind the following rough estimates of sustained transfer rates with different connections:

                   

                  • USB2: around 20-25 MB/s
                  • FW400: around 30 - 35 MB/s
                  • FW800:around 50 - 60 MB.s
                  • USB3: around 65- 75 MB/s
                  • eSATA: around 120 - 140 MB/s

                   

                  assuming modern disks.

                   

                  For studying purposes those transfer rates are perfect. We used LaCie external hard drives for editing DV, HDV and 1080p AVCHD, although with AVCHD in FCP we had to convert it to quicktime files for editing. While doing this as an advanced user I never had any timelines with more than 5 tracks in Premiere or FCP.

                  • 6. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
                    Harm Millaard Level 7

                    A relatively complex timeline with 6 video tracks and an AL can easily require in excess of 300 MB/s. How could USB2 with 20-25 MB/s be 'perfect' for that? Or is that meant to be intended as studying purpose while studying grass grow?

                    • 7. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
                      Shadreck Rukweza Level 2

                      According to my experience, students will not build complex timelines  exceeding more than 3 video tracks. In most cases its video track and title track and thats it. Currently my workstation has got two 1.5TB in Raid 0 and get about 160 - 170MB/s, and still get realtime playback of HDV and AVCHD, or render the work area and still get real time playback.

                       

                      Unless the institution have got more cash to splash then they can buy some expensive hardware for that purpose. If I was the technician I would start by buying one USB 2 external hdd and test it with all the file formats that they use and then see which way to go. USB and Esata may require additional host cards on the computers which maybe unneccessary to go that route. On shared computers students cannot save their work on the local hard drive because someone may plagiarise it, so external HDD is the best way to go.

                      • 8. Re: Rendering Files - File size help!
                        Jim Curtis Level 3

                        I'm on Mac, but I presume this goes for Windows as well:  In Sequence Settings Preview, you can set previews to a compressed format, such as MPEG.  If you choose AVI, you're probably getting uncompressed files, which naturally would be huge.  Choose a compressed codec, and you'll save on drive space.  With 30 students, you'll probably still fill your drives pretty quickly.  You could adopt a policy of deleting preview folders between edit sessions to clear space for the next student.