5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 24, 2012 10:18 PM by winchestercanoe

    How do you retain the quality of Canon HD DSLR files?

    winchestercanoe Level 1

           There is a noticeable loss of contrast (and color) when Canon 1D DSLR 1280x720 60fps files are loaded into Premiere Pro CS6, (by me).  Many different project settings give this same result.  Whether New Sequence - Project settings are Canon XF MPEG2, Digital SLR, AVCHD, or XD CAM HD422, I get nearly the same, (or identical) results.  Changing New Sequence>Settings to enable Maximum Bit Depth and Maximum Rendering Quality, made no difference for me.

      (NOTE - Edit>Preferences>Memory>Optimize Rendering for 'memory' was selected and the program restarted, before enabling Maximum Rendering Quality). 

           Comparing source files played in Windows Media Player, VLC player, and Canon Zoom Browser, all showed higher contrast than in Premiere Pro: toggling between the different windows.  Comparing identical frame screen captures from Premiere Pro CS6 (bitmap) and Canon Zoom Browser (jpeg-highest quality) showed the same results.  At full zoom in Photoshop CS4, certain pixels showed near posterization in the Premiere screen shot.  It seemed that gray tones of medium brightness were affected most.

           The Canon 1d DSLR stores files as a .MOV type, but I don't think Premiere considers this when loading source files.  I don't own the Quicktime program.

           I don't have a CUDA graphics card, but I thought that this card was not supposed to affect file coding or de-coding, according to the Video2Brain hardware optimization tutorials.  Although it might have been that read and write TIMES were unaffected.  These tutorials covered a LOT of (good) material.  My notes say that CUDA cards most affect scaling, blending, 'effects' operations, color corrections, and framing.  Also, by setting New Sequence>Settings> to optimize rendering, I think I should have got  results similar to a CUDA card.

           For me, the loss of contrast (and color) is a significant loss of image quality.  You get the same results from a dirty lens, or shooting through an unfocused obstacle.  I would appreciate any help in this matter.

        • 1. Re: How do you retain the quality of Canon HD DSLR files?
          John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          >Many different project settings

           

          Please NOTE that the PPro CS6 screen may look a bit different

          For CS5 and later, the easy way to insure that your video and your project match

          See 2nd post for picture of NEW ITEM process http://forums.adobe.com/thread/872666

           

          When your project is correct, you do not see a red line over your timeline at 1st import, before doing anything to the video

          • 2. Re: How do you retain the quality of Canon HD DSLR files?
            Bob Dix Photographer Level 2

            The Canon 1D is a little dated  2001 or  Mark II D 2004, may not give you the color you need for HD video. I have used the Canon 5D mark II for 5-6 years in PP at 1920 x 1080p Premiere Pro 1.5.1 and CS5.5.2 and tested on 6.on professional monitors. Technically perfect, and stills on Canon Digital Photo Professional equal to anything on Adobe Photoshop and verified in the printing..

             

            Suggest talk to Canon re sevice ? You may be advised to download Quicktime ....................

            • 3. Re: How do you retain the quality of Canon HD DSLR files?
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              You can't judge the look of video using the monitors inside an NLE, nor using software media players, nor using a computer monitor.

               

              You need a properly calibrated TV for accurate viewing of video signals.  Until you have that set up, there's no way to know that you're seeing what you should be seeing, without alteration by software, video drivers and hardware not designed for the task.

              • 4. Re: How do you retain the quality of Canon HD DSLR files?
                shooternz Level 6

                 

                You can't judge the look of video using the monitors inside an NLE, nor using software media players, nor using a computer monitor.

                 

                I disagree with 2 parts of that!

                 

                (I agree with the second item.)

                • 5. Re: How do you retain the quality of Canon HD DSLR files?
                  winchestercanoe Level 1

                       Thanks John T. Smith, using the Video2Brain tutorial method got me a sequence format of AVC-Intra 100 720 60p, which is one I had not tried before.  I believe this format will give me the highest quality video for Canon 1D M4 1280x720 files.

                       What I see as far as contrast is very close to what I saw before.  Whether the contrast I see is good or bad depends both on personal opinion and monitor charactoristics; mainly the type of monitor and how the monitor is calibrated.  Yes I still see lower contrast in the Premiere video, compared to how its displayed in VLC, Windows Media Player and Canon Zoom Browser.  Based on my Photoshop experience the Premiere video seems to be going through some kind of low-pass filter.  Yes the contrast is less, but the noise is less as well.  How would the Premiere video look after adjustment layers, or Shadow highlight combined with resharpening I cannot say.   It might look good to me and bad to someone else or vise versa.  What I can say for certain in my mind, is that the Premiere video seems to go through some kind of low pass filtering compared to little or no low pass filtering for what you see in the other 3 programs.  And based on my personal habits, I would probably be tempted at this point to adjust that low pass filter in some way.  However, it seems that standard practice would be to apply adjustment layers, etc as I mentioned before.  I'll reserve my opinion for now.