4 Replies Latest reply on Jul 18, 2012 2:09 PM by Daniel Flavin

    Automatic switching to the file I just packaged?

    JamesCurle

      Maybe I'm weird or maybe it's poor form, but when I am working on one of my newsletters, I like to package it right away and work only with the packaged InDesign file, then delete the original. Does anyone else do this? In my mind it ensures that the version I send off to print--or have to make changes to during proofing--is the one and only instance of that file, avoiding any confusion from accidentally editing the wrong instance.

       

      That said, I'm wondering if InDesign contains the means to, upon packaging a file, automatically close the instance currently open and reopen the instance contained within the package I just created. Yeah, yeah...it takes all of 30 seconds and a few mouse clicks to do it manually, but discovering a pre-exisiting solution would be great.

       

      I'm not that familiar with scripting, but that seems like something that could be done through those means.

       

      Am I weird, lazy, or some (likely) combination of the two?

       

      P.S. This is my first post, but these forums have come in handy many, many times before and I'm thankful for them.

        • 1. Re: Automatic switching to the file I just packaged?
          BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          I don’t know anyone who does that and quite frankly I don’t understand why you do it, either.

           

           

           

          The only thing I ever send out is a PDF.

           

           

           

          All that said, you could always pop over to the scripting forum and see if anyone there can offer up a script for you.

           

           

           

          Bob

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Automatic switching to the file I just packaged?
            JamesCurle Level 1

            Bob,

             

            Thanks for the scripting forum advice.

             

            I should clarify...we switched to delivering PDFs about a year and a half ago, which has greatly simplified things (as you might imagine). But old habits die hard, and--in defense of my weird habit--having all the art, fonts, etc. neatly bundled up in a folder with the working file (versus having to re-link files stored on our main server or on other coworkers' computers) "feels" good to me. And it makes storing years' worth of newsletters nice and neat when the time comes to find artwork in prior editions, if need be.

             

            I figured I was in the minority, but hey, we folks in the creative world rely on our idiosyncrasies, right?

             

            Thanks again.

            • 3. Re: Automatic switching to the file I just packaged?
              BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

              So, why not just package everything once you’re finished?

               

               

               

              Again, though….I’m not telling you how to work and hopefully someone will be able to help.

               

               

               

              Bob

              • 4. Re: Automatic switching to the file I just packaged?
                Daniel Flavin Level 4

                I agree with your method and yearning. Yeah, yeah, yeah Bob; send out a pdf; multiple instances of identical assets are a poor idea; etc.

                 

                In practice, I have peers who need me to perform more of a tasks beyond their ability to legacy files. That end product is a packaged folder. The final steps before handoff are typically cleaning up of the pasteboard(s), preflight(s) and package. Then, close the original document, export appropriate pdf's to the package folder.

                 

                Afer hounding clients for years to actually proof their handoff file, typically their pdf, rather than their working file, one gets anal about ensuring the last InDesign file they work in is that in the package folder; the point of the OP.

                 

                My 2 cents