6 Replies Latest reply on Aug 6, 2012 9:03 AM by Jim_Simon

    Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System

    Jay Saan

      I don't care for a RAID configuration (also don't have a controller) and am wondering what would provide the most efficiency for a computer with 5 hard drives.

      Using the "Generic Guidelines for Disk Usage," I've narrowed it down to these divisions, but I'm not sure which one, if any, would take priority in taking up a drive by itself. Media files are always huge so I was thinking maybe I could just use it as a second media drive or as a generic storage/backup drive?

       

      C OS, Programs

      D: Media, Projects

      E: Pagefile, Media Cache,

      F: Previews, Exports

      G: ???

        • 1. Re: Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          If you have a separate backup disk, then you may consider using D for media from camera 1 and G for media from camera 2, or you could put the projects on G if you have only 1 camera. As always, it is all about spreading the load, hence my suggestion the spread camera 1 and 2 across different disks.

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          • 2. Re: Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System
            Jim_Simon Level 9

            Here's what I'd do.

             

            C: System

            D: Projects

            E: Scratch, Cache

            F: Media

            G: Exports, Images (from Encore)

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            • 3. Re: Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System
              Jay Saan Level 1

              Thanks to both of you.

               

              Jim~ Do you put your pagefile in C: or F:?

              • 4. Re: Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System
                Jim_Simon Level 9

                I leave it alone.  With sufficient memory, the times Windows will need to use it are rare.  And even when it does need to swap, having it on C: actually spreads out the disk load more efficiently than putting it elsewhere. You have to remember that once PP is loaded, Windows is not realy using the C: drive for much.  Putting the Pagefile onto a different working drive only increases the likelyhood of that disk being accessed both by Windows doing the swap and PP reading the media (or whatever else is on that drive).

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                • 5. Re: Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System
                  Jay Saan Level 1

                  Just to be thorough, I have some more questions:

                   

                  1) Is it okay for After Effects and Premiere to share the same drive for Cache files? I wonder about performance issues with Dynamic Link.

                   

                  2) When you say "Projects," do you specifically mean the .prproj and .aep files? So, each time I create a new project, I will have to make sure to save in the "Project" drive, since project settings are not preset.

                   

                  3) By "Scratch," I'm assuming both capture and preview files that should not be in the same folder as the project file (above)?

                   

                  4) Based on this setup, it seems that the scratch/cache and media drives would become disproportionately saturated compared to the other drives. Would it make sense to put projects and exports on one drive and separate scratch and cache into two different drives or would this negatively disrupt read-access? However, it appears you recommend scratch and cache in the same drive since they are interrelated files that Premiere uses to render previews.

                   

                  Always learning. Thanks again.

                  • 6. Re: Optimal Configuration for a non-RAID 5 HDD System
                    Jim_Simon Level 9

                    1.  Well, if you don't have any more drives to split them up, then it will have to be.

                     

                    2.  Yes, the project files.  (Along with any still images and audio files needed for the project.)

                     

                    3.  If you have the extra hard drive to put them on (and you do), it helps spread out the load.

                     

                    4.  The problem with Projects and Exports on the same drive is that you'd be reading and writing to the drive at the same time.  That's the kind of thing that slows you down.  The idea is to separate the load as much as you can so that a disk is only being accessed by one process at a time.  With more drives, you can separate things even further.  But for the drives you have, my suggested setup should give you pretty good performance.

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