3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 13, 2006 9:31 AM by inlineblue

    eclipse plugin

    sam luke Level 1
      Its always puzzled me why software manufacturers provide plugins to eclipse! Especially when you have to buy them and when one of the main reasons for using ecplise is that it is free. I noticed that when you install flex builder 2 eclipse you are given a 30 trial, or you can actually buy the product. Can somebody explain to me, if I understand it correctly, why you can actually download the eclipse plugin source code(Iam presuming this although I havent actually downloaded and tried it yet) from the following site:

      http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/knowledgebase/index.cfm?id=4b243413

      Is this the same plugin as the one you install with flex builder 2? Is there a trial period with this download?
        • 1. eclipse plugin
          inlineblue Level 1
          No, that download page is to download the parts of FB2 that were derived from Eclipse source code. It's not the entire source code, just the parts that use Eclipse source code. And I would imagine that it's a pretty small part of the entire plugin.

          And why should it be puzzling that some companies sell plugins? Are they not entitled to make money from their hard work? Just because you're given an advanced tool such as Eclipse, it doesn't mean you're automatically entitled to free enhancements. If you can't/won't buy a plugin, then don't use it.
          • 2. Re: eclipse plugin
            sam luke Level 1
            So whats the point in downloading parts of the source code? Is that just to fulfil the license issues?

            I agree. People should be rewarded for there hard work. I therefore would expect that the product would be actually cheaper because not as much development has been done with the plugin than developing the IDE from scratch?
            • 3. Re: eclipse plugin
              inlineblue Level 1
              Yes, Adobe is complying with the terms of the Eclipse Public License.

              As for price, it's still Adobe's prerogative on how they wish to price their products. As usual, the open market will determine whether it's a justified price. Judging by initial reactions, software firms (including mine) are more than willing to pay the asking price.