7 Replies Latest reply on Sep 10, 2012 8:27 PM by 420jammer

    Enlarging Null and Cam

    420jammer Level 1

      Hey guys, just experimenting and remembering how to work with nulls to control cams.

      I noticed when I enlarge the null in one dimension, the camera's view also seems to widen.  What's happening here?  What is that and what am I doing that is causing the camera to "see" differently? I thought the whole point of a null was that it didn't have a physical dimension and was really only about orientation and position?

        • 1. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
          420jammer Level 1

          Is it because by widening the null object I'm changing the center anchor point that the camera is based on?  But then why isn't it just translating the image layer, why is it stretching it sideways?

          • 2. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
            Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

            I thought the whole point of a null was that it didn't have a physical dimension and was really only about orientation and position?

             

            What has any of that do do with a transformation matrix in a computer program? How would you expect that same Null to act then, if other layers are parented to it and you want to scale them? I'm afraid your simplistic logic isn't going anywhere. It works as it should. If you want the Null to be visually larger, use the layer settings, not the scale.

             

            Mylenium

            • 3. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
              420jammer Level 1

              Woahhh hold your horses! 

              I'm trying to understand the program, not trying to criticize it.  I love Adobe and AE.  Did it sound like I was trying to pick it apart?

               

              What I'm trying to understand is why when I resize it horizontally, it changes the camera view...and therefore understand how it's changing the camera view.  This is an important concept for me to get about this.  It's not something I have been able to find in literature or other boards.  That's all I'm trying to ask.  I'm not trying to argue with it or point out a flaw or something like that, I just don't understand what's going on.  Is the camera changing and how when I enlarge the null?

              • 4. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
                Dave LaRonde Level 6

                You have the camera aprented to the null.  When you move or re-size the null, you also affect the camera.  It's as simple as that. 

                 

                Normally, you DON'T do what you did; nulls are handy for controlling camera motion.  Scale is a different story.

                • 5. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
                  Andrew Yoole MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                  As highlighted in posts of above, adjusting the scale of a camera's parent is not advised.  But on an academic level, it's a really interesting question.  What is actually happening to the camera that causes it's view to change?  I just played with the concept and can't find a single camera parameter that changes when a parented null is scaled.  Despite position, rotation, POI, zoom, focal length, focus distance etc etc remaining unchanged, the camera appears to move backwards in Z space when its parent is scaled up.

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
                    420jammer Level 1

                    Thank you.

                    • 7. Re: Enlarging Null and Cam
                      420jammer Level 1

                      Yea, that's what I was trying to get at...like what calculations are being affected?  It seems no one uses manipulation of this parameter for anything, perhaps because there are more efficient ways to do whatever could be affected or because it affects several parameters simultaneously and thus makes it too difficult to control for some type of effect.  However, I thought it'd be cool if I could distort the camera at will somehow and could use this for something.

                       

                      Someone has got to know more about this.

                       

                      Also, just playing around with lights in cameras in AE, and I'm overwhelmed.  This is so cool