4 Replies Latest reply on Sep 30, 2012 11:24 AM by Rick Gerard

    Ray Traced 3d and MY video card overheats

    50 Hungry Lions

      Hello,

       

      First off, I am not trying to get support to fix this, although some insight what might be going on would be great if someone has an idea.  I am using a GTX 480 with After Effects.  Yes, I realize this is not a supported GPU but it does work, in my case, not the best.

       

      THE ISSUE:  I created a motion graphic that was basically 3 words and some shadows and reflections. I used the ray trace 3d render option, and when I was close to being done, I tried to render it.  Unfortunately the video card temps skyrocketed from 70-80 to over 100 degrees celsius before rendering 2 seconds of the clip. 

       

      Is this something anyone else using a similar video card has experienced?  I just want to see if anyone else has this issue using a GTX 480. Again I understand its not supported by Adobe, but this is what forums are for, to find others that may have had same issue.

       

      I can still render, but it involves me pushing the card to the limit, pausing, and then restarting after the card has cooled down.  I do have the most recent drivers from Nvidia, v 306.23.  The ambient temps in my house are around 70 degrees Farenhiet, and my card idles at around 45-50degrees celcius.  I have 24 gigs of ram and a i7 920. just for comparison sake, not sure if this is needed.

       

      It might be an air flow problem too.  I plan on getting a new pc when the new i7's come out next year, but this is putting a hamper on my work now. I am only a hobbyist/part time freelance at the moment.

       

      Thanks for any input.

        • 1. Re: Ray Traced 3d and MY video card overheats
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          I would bring in extra cooling for your video card. There are a bunch of options depending on your case design. I used to have a monster PC when quad Xeon was the best you could buy. Liquid cooled the CPU and the graphics card and also installed 3 extra fans to keep things manageable on rendering.

          • 2. Re: Ray Traced 3d and MY video card overheats
            50 Hungry Lions Level 1

            Thanks Rick. 

             

            I take it from your post that, no matter what, rendering is going to stress and heat hardware? 

            • 3. Re: Ray Traced 3d and MY video card overheats
              50 Hungry Lions Level 1

              this is figured out. 

               

              Took the time to take apart the pc and video card and give it a total cleaning.  Now seeing 80 degrees celsius has top end. 

              • 4. Re: Ray Traced 3d and MY video card overheats
                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                I believe standard maintenance for air cooled electronic equipment that has no air filtration system built in should be a monthly light cleaning and a semi annual thorough cleaning. One of the facilities that I occasionally work for on a freelance basis only cleans their machines when they fail. Something has failed on almost a third of my visits.

                 

                The last PC I built I put a filter in the air inlets. There's all kinds of materials you can get that do a good job of catching most of the lint without fouling up the air flow.

                 

                I have my laptops cleaned at least semi annually but I vacuum out the air vents twice a month with a low power device that doesn't spin up the internal fans. You've got to be careful that you don't damage the equipment by over revving rotating parts with too much air pressure.

                 

                If I were to set up an office workspace I'd put an electrostatic air cleaner in the office to minimize dust. One equipment failure on a project with a deadline would pay for a really high end filtration system. I run electrostatic air filtration in my home instead of the paper air filters on the HVAC system. It's amazing how little dust and lint we get in the house.