5 Replies Latest reply on Oct 15, 2012 7:25 AM by Steven L. Gotz

    Importing to bin converts .MOV to MPEG

    narsenyev91 Level 1

      So I'm taking a production class in school and our professor automatically docks points for anything turned in as an MPEG file, making the case that no camera shoots in MPEG(2) and therefore we are somehow transcoding our files. I'm using 5.5 and shooting on a Canon T4i in 1080p24fps.

       

      I've noticed that as soon as I import the individual .MOV clips into premiere, they keep the ".MOV" extension but once I click on Properties it displays the clips as MPEG files. So when I export the project, it naturally puts it in the MPEG format.

       

      My professor states that there's no way a modern dSLR records as an MPEG file. Does anyone know why my .MOV files show as MPEGs as soon as I import them into my project?

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: Importing to bin converts .MOV to MPEG
          josephs51576386 Level 3

          That camera records files using the MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 codec. So that is whats actually inside of the .mov container. Your profressor is incorrect to make the such a extremely broad statement. Such as NO MPEG files! lol (Since that can mean a lot of different things) Also when you export your finished edit from Premiere when you're dealing with AVCHD media you're automatically going to be chosing a format when you're done editing and when you export Premiere is going to send it to AME which means that the file is getting encoded regardless... So what he is saying doesn't make much since for the most part. This is why using the term "MPEG files" doesn't really narrow things down very much, because there are several different types of "MPEG" files. So when Premire is showing you the .mov file using the  MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 codec listed as a "MPEG" it's not converting anything. It's simply telling you the type of video inside of the file container.

           

          http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/slr_cameras/eos_rebel_t4i_18_135mm _is_stm_lens_kit#Specifications

           

          Also as you can see here the canon c300 records in MPEG-2 so you can make your profressor aware of this so he can learn that stuff does indeed record as mpeg-2. Actually quite a few modern cameras record using MPEG-2 instead of h.264. However though it uses the MXF container, this will sort of explain what I meant though when I was trying to explain that you cannot simply call something a "MOV" file. So it's strange your professor would do so.

          http://www.photographybay.com/2011/11/03/canon-eos-c300-full-details/

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Importing to bin converts .MOV to MPEG
            SimonHy Level 2

            Yeah... lots of DSLRs shoot MPEG in a quicktime container. We just bought two far more expensive cameras that shoot MPEG. I don't think your professor knows what they're talking about.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Importing to bin converts .MOV to MPEG
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              no camera shoots in MPEG(2) and therefore we are somehow transcoding our files.

               

              Your professor is dead wrong on this one (or you misunderstood him).  Pretty much every high definition camera available today records using some form of MPEG compression.  MPEG4 is more common, but MPEG2 is still used in some models.

               

               

              So when I export the project, it naturally puts it in the MPEG format.

               

               

              That's because you told it to.  Premiere Pro doesn't make up the export settings on it's own, it exports to the settings you tell it to.  So if you got an MPEG export, you told it create an MPEG export.  There's nothing to stop you from creating a different kind of export, although in today's world, the vast majority of deliverables will be using MPEG compression of one type or another - DVD, Blu-ray, web, computer playback, broadcast, etc.

               

               

              My professor states that there's no way a modern dSLR records as an MPEG file

               

               

              In point of fact, they ALL do.  Some might also offer the option of recording to Motion JPEG, but MPEG compression of one type or another is the predominant format, not just in DSLR's, but in all HD cameras.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Importing to bin converts .MOV to MPEG
                narsenyev91 Level 1

                Thanks for the help guys... I will continue dialoguing with him on this. I knew that "MOV" is a container format rather than the actual video format, although I will confess I'm still confused as to what that means exactly. His point was that MPEG-4 is of a higher quality than MPEG-2, and I believe he is right about that.

                 

                Looking at the specs provided by Canon (and courtesy of ComputerNovice25), H.264 seems to be the equivalent of MPEG-4, so I'm still unsure why my exported project is in MPEG-2. I've tried playing with the export settings, but when I select MP4 it seems to drop the resolution below even SD. What got me the MPEG-2 result was clicking on the "Match Sequence Settings" checkbox which I assumed would get me the best quality.

                 

                Now that I'm looking at it again, the H.264 option retains the 1080p resolution.

                 

                My question now is this: does importing with the H.264 settings mean better video quality over just selecting the "Match Sequence Settings" option?

                 

                Again, I greatly appreciate the help. My professor is a cool if headstrong guy, and I'm sure I can reason with him on this if I'm better informed.

                • 5. Re: Importing to bin converts .MOV to MPEG
                  Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                  Exporting to what? For what? DVD, YouTube, flash drive?

                   

                  For YouTube and Vimeo you use H.264, and the file has a .mp4 extension (on a PC at least) if you use the correct preset. YouTube will use 8Mb/s and Vimeo 5Mb/s but your teacher may way 25 Mb/s or more. Whatever the original uses.

                   

                  If you are exporting to a file to hand in on a flash drive, you might want to up the data rate to the max, but be careful not to make it so that the PC will not play it.

                   

                  If your teacher is a Mac user, you might want to export to a Quicktime file using the H.264 codec. Be careful if you export to Quicktime to make the change to Progressive. On my PC, the default is interlaced. I don't know why.

                   

                  See these pics:

                   

                  Untitled.pngUntitled1.png