7 Replies Latest reply on Oct 16, 2012 6:11 PM by Matt Finlay

    is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF

    Matt Finlay

      Hello all,

       

      I am finding that i need more control with CSF files than just syncronising a generic setting that was made in one application...

       

      For example, for the same workflow, I need to have different policies in different applications such as:

       

           "Preserve CMYK" in Photoshop to correctly honor profiles in the images etc,

       

           "CMYK off" in indesign to properly preserve the Separation for my output style.

       

      Is there any way that i can make one CSF file that works differently on each application?

       

      Thanks!

        • 1. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
          John Danek Level 4

          CSF File?  What is that?  Color Source File?  I'm pretty sure you can set your individual preferences in each application's Color Settings dialogs.

          • 2. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
            thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

            CSF is the extension for color settings you save out of Adobe app's like Photoshop, InDesign etc.

             

            Each application CAN have their own unique CSF (color settings) as long as you don't try to sync them using say Bridge.

             

            Frankly, there is no reason NOT to have the Preserve Policy unless you want to automate conversions automatically upon opening a doc not in the preferred color space but that can be pertty dangerous!

             

            You can't make one CSF file work differently on differing Adobe app's but you can certainly have multiple CSF files such that each application has it's own unique color settings.

            • 3. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
              Matt Finlay Level 1

              Thanks Andrew,

               

              do you happen to know whether there is any way of limiting a particular Colour Settings file so that it only appears in the menu inside one adobe application?

               

              It's going to get confusing for my users if i have a bunch of different settings called roughly the same thing in each app...

              • 4. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
                thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                You don't even need to make the CSF file, if you create a color settings within each application, that is stored within some preference file. The CSF is for sharing those settings on other machines. And at least in Photoshop's color settings, there is a description area where you can explain what the settings are for. That would make it clearer for your users.

                • 5. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
                  Matt Finlay Level 1

                  Okay, Thanks Andrew!

                   

                  I guess from my perspective it seems a littly odd that we are able to syncronize colour settings between photoshop and indesign as they both behave in completely different ways and many of the common settings have entirely different implications... For example having "ask when opening" for profile mismatch is the only way to control your document policies in indesign, which is essential if you are being supplied documents from outside designers. In photoshop this same function equates to an annoying dialog box that does not tell you anything you can't find out or fix without this option enabled.

                  • 6. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
                    thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                    Matt Finlay wrote:

                    For example having "ask when opening" for profile mismatch is the only way to control your document policies in indesign, which is essential if you are being supplied documents from outside designers. In photoshop this same function equates to an annoying dialog box that does not tell you anything you can't find out or fix without this option enabled.

                    I don't see the differences in the two app's in terms of this setting. If you have Profile Mismatch On, it's only useful to tell you that the current 'preferred' RGB working space isn't the same as the document. Turn on Preserve and the document opens as it should, color managed. Just turn off the warning if it bugs you.

                     

                    The Missing Profile check box is super important because you have to take action and assign a profile or the app just makes a guess as to the color space. Might be right, might be wrong.

                     

                    I'm not a ID power useful. I do own and use it ocassionally but I'm linking all the documents. That said, if I want say ProPhoto RGB to be the preferred RGB working space and I open a doc in sRGB, is that a problem in ID? Converting to ProPhoto in this case is senseless. Just leave the document in sRGB. Upon output, multiple images in differing color spaces should (should) be OK upon conversion to an output color space. Does ID have to have all images in the same color space to print?

                    • 7. Re: is there any way to have unique setup for each Application in a single CSF
                      Matt Finlay Level 1

                      I'm not a ID power useful. I do own and use it ocassionally but I'm linking all the documents. That said, if I want say ProPhoto RGB to be the preferred RGB working space and I open a doc in sRGB, is that a problem in ID? Converting to ProPhoto in this case is senseless. Just leave the document in sRGB. Upon output, multiple images in differing color spaces should (should) be OK upon conversion to an output color space. Does ID have to have all images in the same color space to print?

                       

                      This is probably more evident when looking at a CMYK workflow. Although indesign will let you export PDF's with multiple different embedded profiles, I try to avoid this as it tends to result in issues like illustrator graphics that contain black objects which separate into 4 colour and cause potential registration issues on press etc...

                       

                      I am trying to remove all CMYK profiles and then asign an output intent by creating a PDFX file but so far the only way to consistently & reliabaly do it appears to be to set the CMYK policy to off in indesign...

                       

                      IMO a print ready PDF should only have one profile which describes the printing propcess that will be used to for the file.

                       

                      Andrew Rodney wrote:

                       

                      Matt Finlay wrote:

                      For example having "ask when opening" for profile mismatch is the only way to control your document policies in indesign, which is essential if you are being supplied documents from outside designers. In photoshop this same function equates to an annoying dialog box that does not tell you anything you can't find out or fix without this option enabled.

                      I don't see the differences in the two app's in terms of this setting.

                       

                      The function inside photoshop equates to "ask me what to do if i open an image whoes assigned profile is different to my workingspace profile". Inside indesign this option represents a conflict in a documents embedded policies with regard to "CMYK/RGB Policy, Document CMYK/RGB profile and also offers you the oportunity to manage the color of placed content".

                       

                      While profiles can be assigned elsewhere, and placed content can be managed elsewhere, from what i understand, the only other way to affect your document's CMYK/RGB Policy is through scripting... Changing this in your colour settings only changes this for newly created documents as these options are inherited by the document from the applications colour settings at the time of the document's creation...