35 Replies Latest reply on Oct 28, 2012 6:04 PM by josephs51576386

    Working with multiple video resolutions ...

    joneisele Level 1

      I am putting together a home movie, in case that matters, where my video was taken on a variety of cameras.  I have 1920x1080 30fps (Sony camcorder), 1280x720 60fps (Flip), 1280x720 30fps (iPhone 4), 720x480fps (miniDV).    Targets are PS3/big TV, PC, and BD or DVD disc.   The 1080p Sony footage is my most abundant and important footage.    Questions less any open-ended comments, I'm all ears.

       

      1) What would you all set for sequence settings?    In my layman's mind I favored the 1080p footage creating a sequence using one of the Sony clips.

       

      2) Any issues exporting to H.264 1080p 30fps?  That format plays natively on my Sony PS3, PC, and easy to create a BD without further encoding.   Any special settings I should set when I export?   Or should I be going with a different format in this case?  I get confused on the whole when to upscale vs. downscale topic.

       

      3) Assuming yes and yes, would you want to scale the lower resolution clips to frame size?   Or would you leave them with big black bars on all sides?   Or would it depend on which resolution listed above?

       

      4) Assuming you said scale to frame size for all, unfortunately I was not aware of the Edit.Preferences.General.Default Scale to Frame Size setting until I after I imported.  I have spent days and hours pouring over hundreds of video clips, so going back and re-importing and editing would be a nightmare (unless there is someway to cause PP to resync with original clips achieving the same result).    So is the best option then to select the clips on the timeline and check "Scale to Frame Size"?   It looks like I can do that by selecting multiple clips on the timeline and get them all at once.    If the option is set for the 1080p clips (that match the sequence) will it just be ignored?  My footage is mixed throughout the time line.

       

      Thanks!

      Jon

        • 1. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          Option 1.  Given that you're including SD footage, you should probably be working in an SD sequence.  Scale the HD stuff down, rather than the other way 'round.  Export out for DVD (forget Blu-ray) using an MPEG2-DVD reset.

           

          Option 2.  Work in a 720p/60 sequence, scale down the 1080 and forget about including the DV.  Export out to Blu-ray using an H.264 Blu-ray preset, and to DVD using an MPEG2-DVD preset.

          • 2. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
            joneisele Level 1

            Let me add a bit more context in case it changes opinions.  This video is family / home video.   Not using the miniDV footage would be an issue.   However, after a certain point in time I stopped using the minDV camera when I got the Sony HD camcorder.  So in theory I could make a separate movie up until that point, although would prefer to have one longer movie.

             

            Beyond that time, my primary use is the 1080p Sony camcorder.  Once in a while my wife will take a clip on her iPhone.  In some instances I get lazy and bring an old Flip 720p camera instead of the larger Sony.    In any event, 80%+ of my video is on the Sony.

             

            Thanks

            • 3. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              Two movies would be the way to go.

               

              But still work in a sequence matching your lowest resolution.  Scaling down is generally better than up.

              • 4. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                joneisele Level 1

                Would you all walk me through the specifics here to achieve the best result?    If I do the separate movie thing I then have 1280x720 59.94fps progressive footage to mix with NTSC-DV 720x480 29.97 interlaced (yes, I know what now ...) footage.   Would you create a sequence to match the latter including interlaced and then drop in the 720p stuff?   I did so and the downscaled 720p clips look pretty bad, perhaps worse than the SD clips. Or are there some settings I need to tweak?   Or should I be using a different workflow here?  

                • 5. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                  If you make separate movies then you keep the DV stuff all by itself, don't mix it with high def media.

                  • 6. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                    joneisele Level 1

                    Here is my quagmire.  Man I wish I had a better understanding of this stuff in the past.  Anyway, I have family video of various things shot on different cameras that need to go together.  For example, one of my kids turned nine years old.  I started with some clips at home in the morning on the minDV camera, then later used the 720p pocket camera at a skating rink party, then back home used the miniDV for opening presents, then to a restaurant with family on the 720p, then back at home again on the miniDV for cake.      I'm trying to chronicle the day's events in this case.   Several other scenarios similar to this one.

                     

                    What would you do in this case?  

                    • 7. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                      Jim_Simon Level 8

                      In that case, work in a DV sequence and scale down the 720p stuff.  No, it won't look as good scaled down, but it'll look better than the DV stuff scaled up.

                       

                      And take this as a lesson learned.  Use the same camera for everything.

                      • 8. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                        MannyEdwards Level 1

                        I concur with Jim -- scale down the 720p footage. One alternative, depending on how the scenes cut together, would be to create a 720p sequence and cut to a smaller image when you get to the DV footage. So your DV footage will "float" in a window, and maybe you can add titles or birthday balloons or something, and make it look like an intentional creative choice. Just spitballing.

                        • 9. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                          joneisele Level 1

                          Absolutely learned a lesson here.   Unfortunately, I'm going to deal with the mixed format nightmare through this year.    Same camera would be ideal - but I am also assuming that multiple cameras are ok if all set to the same mode?   My wife has a Cannon 7D; I have a Sony camcorder; will buy a new pocket camcorder for portable situations - but all these shoot 1080i.

                           

                          Topping off here ... let's say I go with the DV sequence with 720p clips route.  Would you alter any settings differently in this case (vs. just DV footage) on export?    E.g., let's say you choose MPEG2-DVD format.    I am assuming bumping up the Quality slider is ok; 2-pass VBR.   Any tweaks to frame rate, field order, PAR, bit rate, GOP, etc.?   Or would you leave those the same as source / DV?

                          • 10. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                            SimonHy Level 2

                            Do you have an SD display?

                             

                            If not, and these will only ever be watched on an HD display, I don't understand the merits of scaling footage down to SD quality, only for it to have to be scaled back up again, on the fly, for it to be viewed. In theory you might be preserving the quality of the SD footage, but if no-ones ever going to see it like that, what's the point?

                             

                            If it's going to be watched in 1080, I'd cut it all in a 1080 sequence, and I'd  letterbox some of the footage if it starts to look too bad blown up. But it'll look better blown up and exported than blown up on the fly by a tv's re-scale function.

                            • 11. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                              EditorPete Level 1

                              +1 here

                               

                               

                              SimonHy wrote:

                               

                              Do you have an SD display?

                               

                              If not, and these will only ever be watched on an HD display, I don't understand the merits of scaling footage down to SD quality, only for it to have to be scaled back up again, on the fly, for it to be viewed. In theory you might be preserving the quality of the SD footage, but if no-ones ever going to see it like that, what's the point?

                               

                              If it's going to be watched in 1080, I'd cut it all in a 1080 sequence, and I'd  letterbox some of the footage if it starts to look too bad blown up. But it'll look better blown up and exported than blown up on the fly by a tv's re-scale function.

                              • 12. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                Jim_Simon Level 8

                                Any tweaks to frame rate, field order, PAR, bit rate, GOP, etc.?

                                 

                                Don't change anything but the bitrates.

                                • 13. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                                  I don't understand the merits of scaling footage down to SD quality, only for it to have to be scaled back up again, on the fly

                                   

                                  Because the Blu-ray player's upres will provide better results than software.

                                  • 14. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                    SimonHy Level 2

                                    Jim Simon wrote:

                                     

                                    I don't understand the merits of scaling footage down to SD quality, only for it to have to be scaled back up again, on the fly

                                     

                                    Because the Blu-ray player's upres will provide better results than software.

                                    Is that definitely the case? I'm relatively new to Premiere and haven't had to do any real scaling with it yet, but if that's so then that's quite disappointing. Premiere can take as long as it needs to re-scale things during an export, it should produce a higher quality result than a real time upscale. Certainly that has been my experience with other NLEs.

                                    • 15. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                      josephs51576386 Level 3

                                      It is for sure the case. I promise you it is the case. In my own personal experince I haven't ever found a software program that does good upconversions IMO. Both my Blu-ray and my DVD player upconvert better than any software solution I have ever used. I recently got the new Teranex upconverter BMD is selling and it does WONDERFUL upconversion much better than any DVD player, but like I said that is a hardware solution. I have used many software solutions in the past for upconversion and honestly I wasn't happy with any of them. Some are however better than others but none of them compare to my DVD/Blu-ray player's upconversions. I have seen upconversions done with compressor, AME, Red Giant's solution and the list goes on and on. The answer is always the same though.

                                       

                                      Generally speaking if I have SD content and I have other 1920x1080 content I don't ever try to do software based upconversions because then my end result looks terrible everytime it hits the SD section of the video. However if I downres my HD content I end up with a end product that looks good on both SD sets and HD sets. The only time I personally ever decide to do software based upconversion with anything is if it's really good looking 1280x720 footage and I'm working inside a 1920x1080 sequence. Because generally you can sometimes get away with a small amount of upscaling without the end result looking horrible.

                                       

                                      Even BMD's decklink cards upconverts better than any software solution I have personally ever seen.

                                      • 16. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                        SimonHy Level 2

                                        I've heard the Teranex is really good.

                                         

                                        It's always going to look like SD in an HD timeline, but I've run things through compressor with the resize settings on max, and although it takes ages I've been fairly happy with the results - not great mind you, but  not worse than bluray upscaling to my eye. I find it hard to believe that downresing something from 720p to SD and then having hardware scale it back up again is going to produce good results.

                                         

                                        I upscale everything because I have to. Everything I work on has to be delivered in HD, regardless what the source was. You come to accept it after a while.

                                         

                                        I guess the other factor from there is story. It's a home movie, what's more imporant, preserving image quality on the lowest quality shots, but you have to change discs, or creating a more immersive experience. I like things to look good, but it's not actually the only consideration.

                                        • 17. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                          Jim_Simon Level 8

                                          I find it hard to believe that downresing something from 720p to SD and then having hardware scale it back up again is going to produce good results.

                                           

                                          That depends on how you define "good".  Granted it won't be HD anymore, the 720 will take a hit.  But the SD will look better done this way, and you'll get a more consistent quality between SD and HD when done this way.

                                          • 18. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                            josephs51576386 Level 3

                                            If you're having to upconvert content often I'd really recommend purchasing at least a BMD card for doing the upconversions, even though it doesn't make the video look like real HD footage, it does however look much much better than if it was upconverted to HD via a software program (at least the ones I have used or seen). What you have pointed out though is partially true IMO, if you want to tell a story and part of the footage that you have to use in order to tell the story in the best way is SD but you HAVE to have a HD end product then obviously I would agree that you have to upconvert even though it's not ideal. Although I'd highly recommend investing in a hardware device for this because I promise you hardware devices do wonderfully when compared to all the software I have ever seen used. (Including compressor/AME/Red Giant's instant HD and many others)

                                             

                                            Another thing you mentioned that I agree with is that if only a very small portion of the footage is SD and the majority of your content is HD then I also would chose to just upconvert the SD footage. However I would only do so if it was a small portion of the project. The other thing you mentioned which I happen agree with is that it really depends on how crucial it is to the story you're trying to tell.

                                             

                                            However the reason I posted my response was because you had asked if hardware upconversions were actually really better than premiere's software upconversions. So I wanted to assure you that yes they are better (In my own personal experince) and that also they aren't only better than Premiere's scaling but also better than all the other software I have ever seen do upconversions. Currently where I work we constantly get content that is SD but have to mix and match footage. Like I mentioned briefly in my last statement I have access to hardware upconversion methods so when needed I chose to take advantage of that. However I also mentioned that I also believe in some cases you should make exceptions to the rule of always downscaling as well. It really depends on the scenario, mainly IMO I think it comes down to a few things.

                                             

                                            1. What is the ratio of SD content to HD content? If it's mostly HD and hardly any SD content I'd personally chose to go with editing in HD.

                                            2. How good is the quality of the SD content? This one is obvious since if it's really terrible you're not very likely to want to upconvert at all. (Unless as stated in number one there is hardly any SD footage at all anyways)

                                            3. What are the delivery requirements? If you HAVE to provide HD then obviously you have no choice that is totally understandable.

                                             

                                            So please understand I wasn't really responding to the OP as much as I was responding to your question about scaling quality of hardware vs software. Although I was hoping the info I was posting would also be helpful to the OP as well.

                                            Trust me though if you have the money you should for sure purchase the Teranex the end result is wonderful. However it still doesn't perform miracles by any means.. But if you're upconverting good quality SD content it actually makes it appear like decent quality HD content.

                                            • 19. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                              SimonHy Level 2

                                              All good. I'm happy to learn, I really don't do a lot of scaling these days cos I barely ever deal with SD anymore. And when I do, it's almost always very old archival footage shot on home video for people's backstories, and I'm okay with that looking like ropey home video footage, cos it is, and that sets the tone nicely. Although when I do have SD I almost always letterbox and create a background around it rather than overly upscale. I'm not saying everyone should work my way, just offering up a different opinion to the "don't use it if it's not the same res" thinking that this thread was going down. Maybe that's good advice, but it really depends on the content, and only the original poster knows that.

                                               

                                              To bring it back to the orginal posters question; if story-wise it's okay for the the SD material to look like it was shot a long time ago, and you've mostly got HD footage, I would totally use it in an HD sequence and be aware that it's not going to look awesome, rather than trying to pursue consistency by making a whole bunch of new HD footage really fuzzy. People aren't going to be disappointed if your wedding footage doesn't match your 25th anniversary footage.

                                              • 20. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                joneisele Level 1

                                                I really appreciate the rich feedback here - this forums is great, especially for us lost in space isolated consumers.   Following up on several questions and comments ...

                                                 

                                                All of my TV's and computer monitors are 1080.  I'm hand waving a bit here, but I'm guessing my footage is 65% 1080i, 25% 720p, and 10% SD; something along those lines.   I am following a chronological story format, but could separate out the early part of the year before I started shooting in 1080i.  But note even there I would still have the mix of 720p and SD.  I can create my own delivery requirements being a home movie, but the plan was to have a .m2t encoding to play on PC's and then BD for the PS3 on a big TV.   So my original layman's thought was to go with a 1080i sequence, put it all in there, and take my lumps with how it comes out.  I guess I would rather favor the bulk of the HD footage looking good. 

                                                 

                                                I did some experimenting tonight.    I took a 1080i sequence created from my dominant footage.  I dropped in a sample 720p and SD clip x 2; on the duplicates I selected Scale to Frame Size.   I watched the result over and over with my daughter on a 55" LED TV playing natively off a flash drive on a PS3 with an H.264 BD encoding .m2t file, VBR 2-pass.   What we discovered in our opinion was that the 720p was a bit too grainy for our tastes when scaled to the frame size.  Despite the pillar bars, we felt the unscaled (right term?) 720p was plenty "big" enough on the screen.   The 720p came off a Flip pocket camera, so nothing stellar to begin with.   On the SD clip, the unscaled version was clearly better looking with smoother motion than the scaled to frame size version.  However, we found it a bit too small with the pillar boxes and ultimately decided we preferred the scaled up size despite the degradation. 

                                                 

                                                Now here is a really interesting note.  Perhaps I did something wrong here?   I took that same SD clip, created a new sequence from it, ensuring it was interlaced, and exported to MPEG2-DVD, VBR 2-pass, etc., imported into Encore, produced a DVD without any transcoding.  We then played this DVD back and forth with the aformentioned scale to frame size H.264 encoding.   I'm not sure I could tell a difference, but my daughter thought the 1080i playing natively off the PS3 look a little bit better than the DVD.    Not what I was expecting.   So unless I am missing something, in this specific case it seems the 1080i sequence is the way to go since we are not observing any benefit with straight SD and it fits better with my home movie situation.

                                                 

                                                Separate topic, but I have a decade of SD home movies stored in various mpeg and avi files.   Upscaling those is intriguing.   Does a BMD card allow you to hardware upscale an SD file on your PC or only on capture from a device?

                                                 

                                                I'm also interested in trying Instant HD.  Here is the rub though - it only works on progressive footage.  Perhaps I should put this question in a separate thread, but what is the best way to convert interlaced to progressive?  Or is that just flat out going to mangle the end results.  Red Giant also makes a plug-in called Magic Bullet Frames that supposedly converts to progressive.    To be clear - not so worried about the bit of SD discussed here on the upscale front, but rather going back to the decade prior.

                                                • 21. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                  josephs51576386 Level 3

                                                  The 1080i playing natively should look better than the DVD hands down. However when the SD content appears on the screen if it's playing on a DVD player that upconverts the SD content to HD it will appear much better than if you had scaled the SD footage via software and edited inside a HD sequence. Your actual HD content would appear much better looking though if you edit in HD and export to HD.  So I just wanted to clarify that. So basically the DVD option will produce better scaling for you SD content because players always generally upconvert better than any software I have ever used or seen used. However it will obviously make your HD content appear lower in quality than it would have if you had just went 1080i to 1080i when you edited. Since you scaled it down then the player is upconverting it again.

                                                   

                                                  Truthfully I think instant HD only works about 10 percent better than Premiere/AME does so I wouldn't recommend the investment. If you want to make interlaced footage progressive you can do so, by right clicking the footage and clicking "modify>interpet footage" then selecting "conform to progressive scan".   You have to right click the footage in your bin with this method though. However it usually doesn't work all that well so once again I wouldn't recommend it.

                                                   

                                                  With a BMD Decklink studio card you can have a device say a camera for instance play going into the card, and it will upscale the content as it goes into the computer and it will capture the video and perform SD to 1080i upconversion in realtime. If you want to perform output processing with the decklink studio you can only do so going from 720p to 1080i sadly.

                                                  • 22. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                    joneisele Level 1

                                                    CN25: note my experiment last night - the SD content in the 1080i sequence scaled to frame size playing natively on the PS3 looks as good as the same SD content in  MPEG2-DVD/Encore/DVD playing on my PS3, which does a great job at  DVD hardware upscaling.  Now maybe the DVD is technically better for the SD and I'm just an untrained eye, but between myself and my daughter the difference was not noticeable, and my daughter thought the SD in 1080i looked better.  We went back and forth viewing both sources multiple times.    Be curious to hear what people think of this experiment / observation.     

                                                     

                                                    So is there no good way to take an existing SD home movie and upscale with hardware then?  Just curious.  

                                                     

                                                    On Instant HD - I may try an experiment because all of their software is available for trial, just has a big X watermark on output.   I will report back assuming I do so.  However, I'm gathering that this experiment won't come out ok given the SD is interlaced and would need conversion.

                                                    • 23. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                      Jim_Simon Level 8

                                                      Be curious to hear what people think of this experiment / observation.     

                                                       

                                                      Hard to believe, honestly.

                                                       

                                                      What size HDTV?  How is the PS3 connected?

                                                      • 24. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                        josephs51576386 Level 3

                                                        In my own personal experince, I haven't ever been pleased with software upconversions they don't even come close to hardware conversions. Where I work we actually have spent a lot of time testing this around the time our station made the upgrade to HD. (Which was fairly recent) However that was just our findings.I do think a lot of people here will agree with me on this fact though that DVD players generally upconvert and produce better SD to HD upconversions than software results using the most common programs produce. (Hollywood might have some type of special scaling software for all we know)

                                                         

                                                        However I would recommend checking that your PS3 is actually upconverting the signal because my understanding is that this setting can be adjusted. (I don't have a ps3 though so I could be totally incorrect)

                                                         

                                                        Also to answer your question about upscaling SD home videos, I don't really feel it would be worth the time unless you're using a hardware solution like a BMD card or another hardware upconversion device. Since your DVD player will upconvert SD content better than software does anyways.

                                                         

                                                        Feel free to try out their instant HD solution. It's slightly better than premiere but still doesn't come close to hardware produced results. If you want you can send me a small test video clip I'd be glad to send you back the  hardware converted clip  vs. software via ADRIVE or another file transfer site so you can compare hardware vs software results yourself. So if you want I am more than happy to do this for you so you can see for yourself however it will have to be when I have some free time.

                                                         

                                                        Anyways though check and verify your PS3's upconversion settings are configured properly.

                                                        http://manuals.playstation.net/document/en/ps3/current/settings/bdsettings.html

                                                         

                                                        http://www.avforums.com/forums/ps3/644613-ps3-upscaling.html

                                                         

                                                        Also make sure it's hooked up via HDMI. (I'm assuming it is I just want to be sure.)

                                                        • 25. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                          Tom Heffernan

                                                          Here's a technique I have seen for using SD footage in an HD timeline: scale up your SD footage to fit the screen. Put a slight blur on it (or no blur). On the track above, put a color matte and adjust the opacity to your liking. Then put the same SD footage on the track above. Your SD footage now floats on the screen, but not in a sea of black.

                                                          • 26. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                                                            The creation of an "abstract background" is a common choice with SD news feeds/material, that is going to HD TV output. One sees it often on networks, like FoxNews, where the source video is SD. Besides the Blur, they usually screen back that background material substantially.

                                                             

                                                            I find it very effective, and more aesthetically pleasing, than letterboxing/pillarboxing, for a lot of material. However, some might prefer the black bars.

                                                             

                                                            Hunt

                                                            • 27. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                              Jim_Simon Level 8
                                                              I find it very effective

                                                               

                                                              I find it incredibly annoying.  If the footage leaves black around the frame, then just leave it black.  That is the way it's supposed to look.

                                                              • 28. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                joneisele Level 1

                                                                My PS3 is connected via HDMI to a 55" LED-LCD 3D TV.  I checked that the PS3 BD/DVD Upscaler settings are set to "Normal".   I'm always impressed with how Holywood DVD's look.  

                                                                 

                                                                On that experiment, I was not anticipating this result.  I wanted to see how much worse the SD was in the 1080i sequenc exported with H.264 BD presets, but discovered I couldn't tell a difference.  Any other thoughts?

                                                                • 29. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                  Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                                                                  I don't know if it annoys me, but it is certainly distracting. Which, depending on the content, can be annoying.

                                                                   

                                                                  Depending on the content, of course, I might try to find a way to put a frame around it. Like a picture of an old TV. Or, maybe I put it on a screen in a virtual set so it looks like it is playing on a monitor in a studio. Some trick to make it seem like it was shot that way on purpose.

                                                                  • 30. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                    SimonHy Level 2

                                                                    Jim Simon wrote:

                                                                     

                                                                     

                                                                    I find it incredibly annoying.  If the footage leaves black around the frame, then just leave it black.  That is the way it's supposed to look.

                                                                     

                                                                    Black at the edges of frame is a technical rejection with a lot of broadcasters due to analog blanking. I think that's why that sort of background has become common. It's not ideal, but it's the reality we live in.

                                                                    • 31. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                      Jim_Simon Level 8

                                                                      In the U.S., there is no more analog broadcast (so no blanking), it's all digital.

                                                                      • 33. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                        Jim_Simon Level 8

                                                                        Well, whatever the technical situation, it's not good aesthetically.  So a solution to accommodate black borders for 4:3 material in a 16:9 frame should be found, rather than forcing content providers to compromise on the aesthetics by filling in the black.

                                                                        • 34. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                          Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                                                                          It's kind of funny, but my wife watches 4:3 SD content on "her" HDTV quite often. The black bars on her cable channels don't faze her in the least because we have a black TV. With the light down low in the room, she has no trouble concentrating on the picture. Me? Drives me NUTS!!!! Record the darn show in HD!!! I can't remember the last show I recorded in SD on "my" HDTV.

                                                                           

                                                                          So, perhaps "normal" people have no problem with it but those of us who know what "should" happen are bothered by it.

                                                                          • 35. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                            SimonHy Level 2

                                                                            Even once all the stations are digital a lot of rules like analog blanking will stick around. So much of the way the industry works is about legacy; things are the way they are because of how things used to work. Broadcasters don't want two sets of quality control specs, and by adhering to a stricter set it means they're covered if they sell the program overseas.

                                                                            • 36. Re: Working with multiple video resolutions ...
                                                                              josephs51576386 Level 3

                                                                              Truthfully though I'm fairly sure Jim was referring to aspect ratio "letterboxing/pillarboxing", I don't think when he said just leave it "black" he was refferring to analog blanking. I haven't ever known any stations that air HD content to reject something because it's pillarboxed. If they did they would have to turn away several older programs that are still done in 4x3.

                                                                               

                                                                              I do agree though stations always tend to leave old rules in place for years after new standards/methods are introduced. Several places still require color bars on digtal files, which is funny when you conisder they don't actually do any adjustments of file based content. (For color anyways generally speaking at least at the places I turn stuff into, they only adjust levels if you turn in tape based content)

                                                                               

                                                                              However I personally don't mind the blurring method some places use. I do however prefer just leaving stuff letterboxed, I don't like the look of pillarboxing though for some strange reason. Which I realize is funny since I don't mind letterboxing but I find watching 4x3 content that is pillarboxed on a 16x9 set annoying.