11 Replies Latest reply on Oct 24, 2012 7:42 AM by Fuzzy Barsik

    What format do I use for upcoming program?

    fullhead Level 1

      I've been editing in SD now for 35 years and have finally made the switch to HD (it's about time!) I bought a new Sony camera and shot a program in XDCAM. I need to add some footage from an existing commercial. What format should I ask the ad agency to send me. I've been editing in CS5 for some time and am trying out CS6 and plan to buy that over the next couple days. To be honest with you, I don't even know what the native Premiere HD format is. I'm a good editor, just technically stunted.

        • 1. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
          SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

          Assuming you're on the PC, then the .avi file format is the most common to Premiere, though it will also edit .mov and others and in fact is quite flexible at accepting just about anything and editing it natively. That said, many formats are for "delivery" and are therefore highly compressed and not good choices for re-editing.

           

          If the agency uses Macs, then Apple ProRes 422 will provide an excellent quality video file to rework. Note that CS5 had a bug in that files with 4-channel audio are unsupported, but ProRes with stereo will work fine. This was fixed in CS5.5 and newer.

           

          You should ask the agency what they normally provide and then we can see if that sounds usable

           

          Thanks

           

          Jeff Pulera

          Safe Harbor Computers

          • 2. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
            Fuzzy Barsik Level 4
            I don't even know what the native Premiere HD format is

            There is no such thing as PrPro native HD format.

            PrPro works natively with any sort of footages in a non-destructive way.

            See this help section on supported file formats.

             

            And yes, PrPro is not free from some bugs (e.g. PrPro CS6 suffers from AVCHD spanned clips issue, which was not a case in CS5.5)

            • 3. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
              fullhead Level 1

              Do you know what format PrPro captures in? Is is the same as the camera that produced the image?

              I'll check on ProRes 422. Are there any formats that I should stay away from?

               

              Thanks!

              • 4. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                fullhead Level 1

                I answered my own question there. There is no such thing as capture any more. I just did a DV program last week using tape and had a brain freeze.

                I am interested, though, in which delivery formats to avoid for editing and those that are desirable for editing.

                • 5. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                  Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                  Of course there is still capture. There has to be. We still have tape cameras! Well, I do anyway. And it works for me.

                   

                  Stay away from ProRes

                   

                  Quicktime is generally OK, although the most important thing is to get it as uncompressed as possible if you are going to edit it. M2T files from an HDV camera work, as do the AVI from MiniDV cameras.

                  • 6. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                    shooternz Level 6

                    There is absolutely no issue with Pro Res. Its is a great format for cross platform and cross facility work as well.

                     

                    Very handy if you want to CC / Grade in Resolve.

                     

                    Premiere handles it very well.

                     

                    FWWI: I dual record AVCHD and ProRes 422 HQ simultaneously.

                    • 7. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                      Fuzzy Barsik Level 4
                      I am interested, though, in which delivery formats to avoid for editing and those that are desirable for editing.

                      It does depend on a particular project.

                      If footages are intended for significant colour correction, pulling a key or time remapping etc., shoot as uncompressed as you can.

                      In the rest cases you can enjoy smaller disk space occupied by highly compressed footages (e.g. AVCHD ones).

                       

                      And a couple of words regard to transcoding.

                      Depending on your spec, transcoding may yield significant time savings in some workflows (e.g. when it is necessary to render the Timeline several times). However, since PrPro is capable of upsampling highly compressed footages 'on the fly', placing them into 32 bit colour space, transcoding doesn't give any advantages in terms of quality (check out this thread and run your own tests if you want).

                      • 8. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                        Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                        Well, after shooternz disagreed with me, I was forced to do additional homework. Son-of-a-gun but I certainly did get that one wrong. Sorry about that. Apparently ProRes 422 is a perfectly fine idea. Hmm. I don't know where I got the wrong idea, but I appreciate the education.

                        • 9. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                          fullhead Level 1

                          I appreciate all the help! Now my big question. I work with Premiere on a PC. Will ProRez still work for me?

                          Thanks!

                          • 10. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                            SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

                            To be clear, you can PLAY ProRes clips on the PC, but you cannot WRITE them. So if someone gives you ProRes clips, you WILL be able to edit them in Premiere and it's a very good source format, but when the job is completed, you would need to export to something else.

                             

                            All you need is to have QuickTime installed. Does not need to be the "PRO" version, no special codec installations, just QT and the clips will work in Premiere.

                             

                            Thanks

                             

                            Jeff Pulera

                            Safe Harbor Computers

                            • 11. Re: What format do I use for upcoming program?
                              Fuzzy Barsik Level 4

                              On Windows you can encode (write) to ProRes with FFmpeg.

                              Didn't test it by myself though and not in the mood to do that in the nearest future.

                               

                              If you need a codec for digital intermediates, have a look at the UT Video.

                              Available for both Mac and PC, and in my testings the quality and render time are identical to TGA or TIFF sequence, whereas the file size is up to 3+ times smaller.