6 Replies Latest reply on Nov 4, 2012 2:31 PM by Jim_Simon

    Exporting Help

    Gugggen

      I am working with a fairly high quality file of AVCHD and I can not find a good export combination. The file is filmed at 1080p at 59.94 FPS. My problem is the original video looks crystal clear and very smooth. When I export it I have tried these settings with the following results: Quicktime 1080i 59.94 fps H.264 Codec with highest quality, the video comes out with huge decrease in resolution but still is smooth. Then I have tried H.264 in 1080p 59.94 fps, video comes out almost same resolution with a little color loss but very stuttery almost as if it were filmed in 15 fps. The last one I have tried is by checking the "match sequence settings" box. When i do that i recieve a dialog with "Error Compiling Movie, Disk Full". My disk are not full so not sure whats going on with that.

       

      If anyone knows of a better exporting trick or anything please let me know. My goal is to export my video to keep the same smoothness and sharpness as the orignal file.

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: Exporting Help
          Steven L. Gotz Level 5

          Export for what purpose?

           

          YouTube? Vimeo? DVD? Blu-Ray?

           

          Archiving for future editing?

           

          There are many ways to export. If you tell us the purpose of the export, we can do a netter job of advising you.

           

          Also, many of the formats to which you might export won't play smootuly on a computer without dropping the frame size or resolution. So when you say it doesn't play smoothly, how are you playing it?

          • 2. Re: Exporting Help
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Steven's questions are very important - the need will dictate how one Exports. This FAQ Entry might be useful too: http://forums.adobe.com/thread/878590?tstart=0

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Exporting Help
              Gugggen Level 1

              Youtube for starts. I think you are right about the computer playback. I first started editing the files on a MacPro Tower which only had a graphics card of 512MB. I then transfered the same file to my macbook pro laptop with a graphics card of over 1gb and it played nice and smooth. But for more info, the file is getting compressed from a raw 1.6gb to a 750mb file so I'm still confused on the playback since the 1.6 raw file plays just fine on the tower with no lag and lags like crazy with the compressed 750mb file.

               

              Lastly shouldnt exporting with the "match sequence settings" keep the same resolution and raw atributes even though it may be cut up? Because when i do that I still recieve the "disk is full" error box.

              • 5. Re: Exporting Help
                Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                I can't help with Mac settings, unless they match what I show here.

                 

                I suggest that you export to H.264 and use the YouTube preset. The actual size of the video on disk doesn't really matter if you are exporting to YouTube does it?

                 

                As for the oroginal post where you say the goal is to "keep the same smoothness and sharpness as the orignal file." ...

                 

                Well, that isn't really possible. But you should get a nice quality video out of the YouTube settings if you started with a nice quality video to begin with. Not 100%. But close enough to be happy with.

                 

                Start with these settings and if you really need to, you can mess around with some of them to attempt to get a better result. There is no point in exceeding the 8Mb/s that YouTube likes as far as I can tell. They will just reduce it when they post it for you.

                 

                Capture.PNG

                • 6. Re: Exporting Help
                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                  the 1.6 raw file plays just fine on the tower with no lag and lags like crazy with the compressed 750mb file.

                   

                  Generally speaking, larger files mean less compression and easier to play.  Smaller files mean higher compression, requiring more horsepower to play.