4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 20, 2012 6:00 AM by r.benari

    Convert to Profile & Soft Proofing.

    r.benari

      Hello,

       

      Apologies if this has been asked and answered. Some answers on soft proofing searched on the forums helped, but didn't hit the nail on the head.

       

      I'm grateful for ideas, instruction, pointers.

       

      I. Per the instructions of the printer who's printing my work, I've converted my image profiles to Dot Gain 20%. I would like to make sure that what I'm seeing on my screen will a) be a close match to what she (the woman printing the work) will see on her screen; and b) give me a sense of how the printer (Espson Stylist Pro 4800) will interpret and print the work. It makes sense to me that I should change my Proof Setup to Dot Gain 20%, no?  Do I have this wrong?

       

      II. I also need to make a set of jpegs that will be seen on a variety of screens, each of a different make and calibration. These jpegs need to be as convincing a match to the print as possible, with allowances, of course being made for paper, ink, etc. The match has to be close. Is there a standard for softproofing that will allow me to see what's likely to appear on a given screen. A tall order, I know. Wondering if I should just inform the viewers to view the jpegs with their monitors set to a certain color profile--or if I should send them a monitor profile along with the jpegs.

       

      Again, I'm grateful for ideas.

       

      Best-

       

      Gear: iMac 27"; Native Gamma 2.2; CS6.

        • 1. Re: Convert to Profile & Soft Proofing.
          Gernot Hoffmann Level 3

          A short guide:

           

          You'll need a valid Monitor Profile (MP) and a Printer Profile (PP) for

          Epson 4800 for a well defined printing process (ink, paper, resolution

          and more).

          If your printing people don't offer a profile, then don't print there.

          A PP contains everything about Dot Gain.

           

          Leave images in sRGB (Working Space sRGB)

          Modify by PhS until the appearance is nice

           

          In Soft Proof choose your PP

          Rendering Intent Relative Colorimetric, Black Point Compensation

          Observe image changes, Soft Proof On/Off

          Observe Gamut Warning, using an alarm color

          If the changes are strong or/and if Gamut Warning areas are large

          (not only highlights or some leaves on trees), then modify your  image.

          This cannot be explained by simple means.

           

          If the image looks agreeable then save with embedded profile sRGB

          and let it print, using exactly the previously defined printer process.

           

          Soft Proof is done by Software, here Photoshop, for a simulated hardware,

          which is entirely defined by the PP.

           

          sRGB is a de facto standard for the Web.

           

          If your images are in a certain sense colorful, then it might be recommended

          to work entirely in AdobeRGB(1998)=aRGB.

          Image in aRGB, Working Space aRGB.

          You can do this after clarifying this issue with the printing people. Of course

          the profile aRGB has to be embedded, but even then, there is a good chance

          that the printing people are not familiar with profiles and assume sRGB as

          source profile.

          Furtheron, you would need two versions - one for printing, one for the Web.

           

          Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann

          • 2. Re: Convert to Profile & Soft Proofing.
            gator soup Level 4

            I've converted my image profiles to Dot Gain 20%. I would like to make sure that what I'm seeing on my screen will a) be a close match to what she (the woman printing the work) will see on her screen

             

            if YOUR monitor profile is proper, Photoshop is 'accurately' displaying your image

             

            to see your image the same, SHE (or anyone) will need to apply your source profile and also have a proper monitor profile

             

            give me a sense of how the printer (Espson Stylist Pro 4800) will interpret and print the work. It makes sense to me that I should change my Proof Setup to Dot Gain 20%, no?  Do I have this wrong?

             

            Gernot offers a good approach (what I would recommend):

            "Leave images in sRGB (Working Space sRGB)

            Modify by PhS until the appearance is nice

            In Soft Proof choose your PP"

             

            in other words, "Soft Proofing" (View> Proof Setup> Custom: Device to Simulate: the specific Epson profile) -- it doesn't make much sense to Soft Proof source DotGain20% to device DotGain20%

             

            my question to her would be: is Dot Gain 20% the actual Epson Print Space (or does she use a specific printer-paper-ink profile that you can Soft Proof on your 'calibrated' monitor)

             

            if she doesn't do any conversions to your DotGain20 file (it is the Print Space), then Photoshop is showing you the contract proof on your monitor when you open it (is my opinion)

             

            I also need to make a set of jpegs that will be seen on a variety of screens, each of a different make and calibration. These jpegs need to be as convincing a match to the print as possible

             

            here, i would Convert to sRGB and embed the sRGB profile -- short answer here -- that is the best you can do

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Convert to Profile & Soft Proofing.
              r.benari Level 1

              Thanks so much Gernot, this is tack on. A great help. Much appreciated.

              • 4. Re: Convert to Profile & Soft Proofing.
                r.benari Level 1

                Thanks so much gs. Spoke with the woman printing the work last night and got a whole lesson about why Dot Gain 20% and what kind of paper. It's all good. This particular job will teach me loads.

                 

                Grateful to you both for your insight and help.