4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 7, 2008 8:10 AM by Newsgroup_User

    Help! ... Old dog, new tricks??

    Nate Owens
      Maybe I'm trying to do the impossible... but thought I would ask.
      If there is another place to post this, please advise

      I am basically an illustrator and designer, and I use simple Flash to do projects on occasion for some clients. I'm no programmer or scripts-wizard, and I stopped upgrading Flash at Macromedia version 5, which has been sufficient for what I want to do - and does it simply.

      Now I must do Flash work for a publisher using their CS3 Adobe version and actions are the only hangup I have encountered. So... maybe there is an easy answer here so I can get the show on the road....

      In Flash 5, it is fairly easy to add frame and mouse actions by simply dragging the required action from one window to the next, and there are popup boxes that allow you to fill in things like the frame or label to go to, or if a certain frame is loaded, etc.

      In Flash CS3 are there any such "helpers" with fields you can type in the data (as described above) so that the program writes the correct scripting like Flash 5 does?

      Doing Flash stuff is just a periphereal part of what I do, and I am hoping I don't have to plunge into a lengthy curve of learning scriptology just to get this project accomplished. It is a simple project, but adding some basic actions is becoming a nightmare.
        • 1. Re: Help! ... Old dog, new tricks??
          Level 7
          Nate,

          > In Flash 5, it is fairly easy to add frame and mouse actions
          > by simply dragging the required action from one window to
          > the next, and there are popup boxes that allow you to fill in
          > things like the frame or label to go to, or if a certain frame
          > is loaded, etc.

          It comes down to what language you're using. When you create a new FLA
          (File > New...) you'll see the choice for ActionScript 3.0 and 2.0. Unless
          you have a reason for specifically using Flash Player 9, go ahead and choose
          the 2.0 version. That "unlocks" the Behaviors panel, which allows you to
          add a number of pre-canned behaviors to buttons, movie clips, and the like.
          It's still not the same as Flash 5, but that may get you started.

          > I am hoping I don't have to plunge into a lengthy curve of
          > learning scriptology just to get this project accomplished.

          I hear that! I know it can seem overwhelming, but depending on your
          exact needs, you might not find the learning curve toooo terribly steep.
          One of the things that really helped me was the realization that everything
          in ActionScript can be thought of as an object -- basically, a "thing" ... a
          thing that has certain uniquely identifying characteristics. In programming
          terms, these characteristics are called properties. Things the object can
          do are called methods. Things the object can react to are called events.
          In the documentation (F1 key), objects are defined by something called
          classes, and class entries have Property, Method, and Event summaries for
          each object. In a way, that helps you navigation the documentation, but you
          can think in terms of: a) what object are you dealing with (a text field?
          TextField class; a movie clip? MovieClip class; and so on) and then b) what
          facet of the object are you dealing with (characteristic, thing-it-can-do,
          or thing-it-can-react-to).

          I wrote a free article for CommunityMX.com that may help you tackle the
          ActionScript Language Reference. It was written for Flash 8 and
          ActionScript 2.0, but that portion of the documentation (ActionScript 2.0)
          is the same.

          http://www.communitymx.com/content/article.cfm?cid=01B54


          David Stiller
          Co-author, Foundation Flash CS3 for Designers
          http://tinyurl.com/2k29mj
          "Luck is the residue of good design."


          • 2. Re: Help! ... Old dog, new tricks??
            robdillon Most Valuable Participant
            Open the Actions window and then select the Script Assist button at the upper right. Actionscript has changed a lot since Flash 5, so the options are greater in the Script Assist window, so it may not seem to be as useful.
            • 3. Help! ... Old dog, new tricks??
              Nate Owens Level 1
              Thanks David and Rob... very helpful
              David... I have bookmarked your article and will dig into it.

              Mostly I do illustration (digital) including stuff like book covers and editorial illustration. Some 3D work which has lead to the Flash projects like banner ads for the clients.

              Now I am doing a major flash project taking a golf green and showing different ways to play it. The green is a 3d image that I rotate, zoom in to and flash animation of correct ball landings and putting. I know how to place the actions and what they need to do, but I hit a wall with this CS3 script stuff.

              Thanks again.
              • 4. Re: Help! ... Old dog, new tricks??
                Level 7
                Nate,

                > I know how to place the actions and what they need to do,
                > but I hit a wall with this CS3 script stuff.

                Chin up! Just keep in mind that you can use your Publish Settings to
                use Flash 5-era ActionScript, if you want. Both ActionScript 1.0 and 2.0
                allow you to place code directly on objects like movie clips and buttons, if
                that's the metaphor that makes the most sense to you. The Script Assist
                feature of the Actions panel works in all flavors of ActionScript, but I
                personally find it considerably less useful in AS3.


                David Stiller
                Contributor, How to Cheat in Flash CS3
                http://tinyurl.com/2cp6na
                "Luck is the residue of good design."