5 Replies Latest reply on Dec 21, 2012 11:47 AM by b2martin_a

    Best way to create  manufacturer-like camera profiles with DNG Profile Editor

    gmh42

      I'm trying to create camera profiles for my Nikon P7000 that simulate the set of profiles supplied by Nikon used by View NX and / or Capture NX.  I'm less concerned with matching the JPEG processing.  Lightroom provides only the Adobe Standard profile for this camera.

       

      I created a profile recipe by shooting a Gretag Macbeth color chart in sunlight and used the chart tool to create the basic chart.  I also opened the .NRW file in Capture NX 2 and saved JPEGs for the Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Landscape, and Portrait profiles.  I now have reasonably close RGB values for each square in the chart. 

       

      I have tried to recreate the colors in the Color Table tab of the profile editor with only partial success.  I don't seem to be able to see the new RGB values for each square as I try to manipulate each point, and can't figure out how to edit the bottom row squares at all.  Any workflow suggestions owuld be greatly appreciated.

        • 1. Re: Best way to create  manufacturer-like camera profiles with DNG Profile Editor
          b2martin_a Level 2

          I found this on a post,  this might work for you.

           

          Open a DNG image of the P7000.  In the DNG Profile Editor, go to Color Tables Tab > Base Profile > Choose external profile and select the Nikon matching profile you want.  You may have to navigate to the folder where the profiles are located.  Select the profile you want and this replaces the tables of the profile you have with the profile you select, then just save the profile.  

          • 2. Re: Best way to create  manufacturer-like camera profiles with DNG Profile Editor
            gmh42 Level 1

            Thanks for the reply.

             

            Unfortunately, the DNG profile editor will only load external profiles that are already DNG profiles (.dcp files), which is exactly what I'm trying to create as these are not supplied by Adobe for this camera. 

             

            ViewNX or CaptureNX create temporary .icm profiles when applying different profiles during editing, but alas, I haven't found any way to convert them into .dcp profiles or otherwise use them in Lightroom.

            • 3. Re: Best way to create  manufacturer-like camera profiles with DNG Profile Editor
              b2martin_a Level 2

              I don't think you understand.  You can select a Nikon matching profile for another camera that has Nikon matching profiles.  You will have to navigate to the folder that has these profiles.  For Windows, that path is:  C > Program Data > Adobe > Camera RAW > Camera Profiles > Camera > (select the camera you want to get profiles from).  I would suggest the Nikon D3000.  I suggest this camera because the profiles for the newer cameras include additional data that may not work for this operation. 

              • 4. Re: Best way to create  manufacturer-like camera profiles with DNG Profile Editor
                gmh42 Level 1

                Thank you for the clarification.

                 

                I had gone partway down that path, using the D70s and D7000 profiles as I'm familiar with those models.  I noticed significant color casts with those profiles.  The D3000 is a bit closer, although Landscape is a bit flat.  I also just tried the Canon G11 and G12 profiles as those models are rumored to have the same sensor as the P7000.  It looks like I can find something that makes for a good starting point.

                 

                Thanks again for the help.

                • 5. Re: Best way to create  manufacturer-like camera profiles with DNG Profile Editor
                  b2martin_a Level 2

                  Glad you are making progress.  I notice that Camera profiles for newer cameras are larger in size (272KB vs 110KB typical) than profiles for older cameras.  I am not sure the ones that are 272KB in size will work correctly, that is why I recommended the D3000.

                   

                  When you say the Landscape is a bit flat do you mean low contrast,  low saturation, or maybe both?  If you want to increase contrast, you can do this with a tone curve under the curve tab.  If you want to change saturation, do this under the Color Matrices tab by adjusting Red, Green, and Blue Primary Saturation slider by the same value.