12 Replies Latest reply on Dec 14, 2012 1:51 PM by Peter Spier

    How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?

    Kourtneeeey

      I'd like to know if it is possible, and if so - how, I can print an InDesign page spread with the layer-coloured bounding box showing around a specific layer's objects?

       

      The purpose is because when we are proofing documents after they have been printed, we need to ensure that certain elements are on the right layer. The best solution I can think of, is if we can print it with the layer's bounding boxes printing also, or even just for that specific layer having the layer's bounding boxes print. We proof our documents by printing them out and marking them up, and it's very important to have some specific elements on the appropriate layer and there is no way to tell, that we know of, once it is printed, and so we have had a situation at times where the text box that should be on a certain layer is actually on a different layer, and it goes to press without being changed.

       

      Hope this makes sense! Would really appreciate any kind of suggestion that could solve this issue.

        • 1. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
          peter minneapolis Level 4

          On the master page(s) reate a text frame on each layer in the Slug area, with the name of the layer, and optionally, color the text frame and/or text to match the layer color. When you show/hide a layer, the slug behaves just like live document page content.

           

           

          HTH

           

           

          Regards,

           

           

          Peter

          _______________________

          Peter Gold

          KnowHow ProServices

           

          Kourtneeeey wrote:

           

          I'd like to know if it is possible, and if so - how, I can print an InDesign page spread with the layer-coloured bounding box showing around a specific layer's objects?

           

          The purpose is because when we are proofing documents after they have been printed, we need to ensure that certain elements are on the right layer. The best solution I can think of, is if we can print it with the layer's bounding boxes printing also, or even just for that specific layer having the layer's bounding boxes print. We proof our documents by printing them out and marking them up, and it's very important to have some specific elements on the appropriate layer and there is no way to tell, that we know of, once it is printed, and so we have had a situation at times where the text box that should be on a certain layer is actually on a different layer, and it goes to press without being changed.

           

          Hope this makes sense! Would really appreciate any kind of suggestion that could solve this issue.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            That's only going to work if you hide all the other layers, Peter, and if you do that it's only useful as a label, like labeling the separations to be sure the plates get mounted correctly on the press.  The OP wants to print a composite proof and identify the layers that the objects reside on. I don't think that's possible.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
              SJRiegel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Why does it make a difference which layer the items are on? If it's because there are two editons (like a students' and a teachers' version), there are other ways to accomplish this. If this is your situation, you could set up a separate spot color called "teachers", and have your printer add this to the black plate only on that version. I use this method to create one version of my catalog with prices, and one without.

              • 4. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                Kourtneeeey Level 1

                Thank you for your feedback, Peter and Peter.

                 

                I guess another option that might work - again if possible, haha - would be if there is a "layer style" option in InDesign that would allow us to, for example, put a 1 px stroke of some colour around all objects that reside on that layer automatically, so that if an object that belonged on that layer was actually on another layer, we would see the discrepancy when it prints.

                 

                The specific layer that this would pertain to is a layer that will not be printed on the final proof, this layer is only used for comments and communicating with our client. So it really doesn't matter what it looks like, we're just looking for some way to differentiate the layer from the other page elements when we are proofing the printed version. Perhaps there is another solution that I haven't thought of yet?

                • 5. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                  SJRiegel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Before you print your final proof, you could set that layer to non-printing. Then anything that should be on that layer, but isn't, would print so you could find it and move it.

                  • 6. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                    Kourtneeeey Level 1

                    I should also add that the documents the client sees are PDFs of the InDesign files, so making a non-printing layer or something like that is not an option, as it has to initially be printable. When the documents go onto the press, the "comments" layer that I'm referring to, is taken off so that they don't print.

                     

                    Sometimes though, the comment boxes have been placed on the wrong layer and we don't even realize it until the press is plated and running hundreds of copies, because nobody has caught them in time to put them on the right layer.

                    • 7. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                      peter minneapolis Level 4

                      If the objects are in anchored frames or inline frames, within a text flow, you can apply conditions, and show or hide them. This is commonly used for workflows for more than one variation of content. Search Google for terms like "InDesign conditional text," without quotes for details.

                       

                       

                      HTH

                       

                       

                      Regards,

                       

                       

                      Peter

                      _______________________

                      Peter Gold

                      KnowHow ProServices

                       

                      Kourtneeeey wrote:

                       

                      Thank you for your feedback, Peter and Peter.

                       

                      I guess another option that might work - again if possible, haha - would be if there is a "layer style" option in InDesign that would allow us to, for example, put a 1 px stroke of some colour around all objects that reside on that layer automatically, so that if an object that belonged on that layer was actually on another layer, we would see the discrepancy when it prints.

                       

                      The specific layer that this would pertain to is a layer that will not be printed on the final proof, this layer is only used for comments and communicating with our client. So it really doesn't matter what it looks like, we're just looking for some way to differentiate the layer from the other page elements when we are proofing the printed version. Perhaps there is another solution that I haven't thought of yet?

                      • 8. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                        SJRiegel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        You can have your layer be a printing layer right up until that final proof, and then set it to non-printing to check for misplaced objects.

                        • 9. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                          Kourtneeeey Level 1

                          Yes, this is what should ideally happen, but there is the odd time that it gets through to the last proof and the client approves it, and at that point it gets plated. I guess we're just trying to remove the margin of human error from the situation so that the slip-ups no longer happen, even once in a blue moon.

                          • 10. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                            SJRiegel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            Could you do all your commenting in Acrobat? If the comments are never actually in InDesign, they can't accidentally get printed.

                             

                            I've also just noticed a fuction in CS6 called NOTES, that let you add comments that are not part of the design. They can be converted to comments in when the document is made into a pdf.

                            • 11. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                              peter minneapolis Level 4

                              Hi, Peter S.

                               

                              Considering that you've got a few billion times more experience in production, it's easy to see that you nailed the weakness of my suggestion in a microsecond<G>. However, Alt/Option+Clicking on a layer's eyeball easily hides or displays all other layers, so it's a little easier to show layers and objects selectively.

                               

                              Off-hand, it seems it might be possible to apply and remove layer-colored strokes with a script. Any scripters care to comment?

                               

                               

                              HTH

                               

                               

                              Regards,

                               

                               

                              Peter

                              _______________________

                              Peter Gold

                              KnowHow ProServices    

                               

                              Peter Spier wrote:

                               

                              That's only going to work if you hide all the other layers, Peter, and if you do that it's only useful as a label, like labeling the separations to be sure the plates get mounted correctly on the press.  The OP wants to print a composite proof and identify the layers that the objects reside on. I don't think that's possible.

                              • 12. Re: How can I differentiate between layers on a printed document?
                                Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                                It's not a screen problem, though, it's for a printed proof.

                                 

                                @Kourtneeeey, this is what Conditional Text was invented for. You can't add a condition to a paragraph or character style directly (and I have no idea why -- I feel a feature request coming on), but you can do it indirectly using Find/Change if you have a unique paragraph stylename for use with comments. I'd do that anyway and set it to bright orange. That won't help if the folks making the comments can't use the styles correctly, of course. The conditioned text can be hidden before the final output.

                                 

                                Similarly, if all notes are in isolated frames you could use an object style for them. Edit the object style before final output to make the frames non-printing. If you're clever you can set the default text frame to the notes object style before giving the file to other users so any new frame they add will be a note.