7 Replies Latest reply on Jan 8, 2013 8:05 AM by emil emil

    Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png

    mccrorey_digital

      I am running into this odd occurence and can't seem to figure it out.

       

      First - I am not an expert in the Color settings/Profiles topic but I am thinking there is an issue here.

       

      When I look at this image "McCroreyDigitalLogo.png" in Photoshop the 'whites' appear right.

       

      Then when I import it into ms PowerPoint, the whites look yellowish.

       

      I have done a series of 'tests' and it seems to be that the color profile out of photoshop and the one in PowerPoint are not compatible.

       

      I have reset my Photoshop preferences with no luck/change to the results.

       

      Finally, I did a screen shot out of photoshop and pasted that into Power point.  The white appeared correct.

       

      Could use some guidance on how to fix this one. Basically any files I run through PS, when they are imported into PowerPoint, the whites turn yellow.

       

       

      McCroreyDigitalLogo.png

      PhotoshopToPowerPoint_ColorIssue.jpg

       

      Thanks in advance

        • 1. Re: Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png
          c.pfaffenbichler Level 8

          How exactly do you create the png?

          Which Color Space is the logo (you can set the Status Bar at the lower left of an image window to display »Document Profile«)?

          • 2. Re: Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png
            mccrorey_digital Level 1

            Dear c.pafaffenbichler,

             

            Thanks so much for your response.

             

            I am not familiar with how to setup the status bar to display that but I did dig around and found this under

             

            "File" > "File Info" > Advanced tab

             

            photoshop: ColorMode:3

            photoshop: ICCProfile: sRGB IEC61966-2.1

             

            Does that help?

             

            Also - can you change that for a given file?   I see under "Edit"  the "Color Setting", "Assign Profile" and "Convert to Profile".  I played around with several of those with no luck.

             

            If you can change it, any suggestions on what I should change it to?

             

            Thanks again

            • 3. Re: Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png
              c.pfaffenbichler Level 8

              "File" > "File Info" > Advanced tab

              You could also set the Info Panel up to display the profile (Panel Options from the Info Panels fly-out menu).

               

              Anyway, I have no experience with Powerpoint, so I don’t know if it is color managed, but srgb should not be a problem in itself as it is a small color space.

              Could you measure the values of the white in Photoshop with the Eyedropper Tool? Is it truly 255/255/255? 

               

              I see under "Edit"  the "Color Setting", "Assign Profile" and "Convert to Profile". 

              Assigning a profile leaves the RGB values unchanged, but the appearace can change severely, because other appearances will be assigned to the values.

              Converting may result in no perceptible change of the image onscreen but changes pixels’ RGB values. This is detrimental to image quality, so one best keep the number of conversions to a minimum; when working for print one usually has to convert to a CMYK space at some point, but that is generally best done pretty much at the end.

              • 5. Re: Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png
                c.pfaffenbichler Level 8

                Did you create the png using Save for Web or Save As?

                Can Powerpoint import psd-files?

                • 6. Re: Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png
                  mccrorey_digital Level 1

                  Wow...I knew it had to be something simple....I just luckily ran accross this thread.  It looks like it is a windows display setting

                   

                  http://forums.adobe.com/thread/772628

                   

                   

                  Basically in Windows, go to the start menu and in the search box, type in color managment

                   

                  Run that utilty...  On the "Advanced" tab, under "Device Profile:"  Change it to sRGB IEC61966-2.1

                   

                  CM2.jpg

                   

                  Thx for the help.

                  • 7. Re: Help with Color Settings/Profiles...White's look 'yellow' when exported to PowerPoint as a .png
                    emil emil Level 4

                    PowerPoint is not a color managed program and can display the color values only in the color space of your monitor without any correction.

                    Color managed programs like Photoshop correct the color values when displaying them in order to simulate within the color space of your monitor other color spaces, for example sRGB, AdobeRGB, the color spaces of various printers, and etc. For this reason you can not match the color in non-color managed programs to the color of color managed programs but you can do the opposite match the color in Photoshop to PowerPoint.

                     

                    There is two ways to do this:

                    One way is if you want the color values in Photoshop to remain the same but be displayed in the color space of your monitor which PowerPoint is using, you can either color proof with or assign your monitor profile to the document.

                    To color proof choose View > Proof Setup > Monitor RGB.

                    To assign, choose Edit > Assign Profile, select Profile and from the menu choose the color profile of your monitor. If you are not sure what's the name of the color profile of your monitor, go to the Color Settings, in the Working Spaces section use the RGB menu, scroll up and check what it says after Monitor RGB-

                    Both proof and assign will give the same result on your monitor but the difference is - the proof is temporary and will last only for the session and the profile, if embedded when saving the file, will stay and when open in other color managed programs including those on other users' computers the color space of your monitor will be simulated and for those users who don't use color managed programs the colors could be way off than if saved with a profile of a more common color space like sRGB.

                     

                    The other way is If you want the appearance in Photoshop to remain but the color values converted to the color space of your monitor, choose Edit > Convert to Profile, and from the RGB menu choose the color profile of your monitor. This will preserve the appearance and also match the colors in PowerPoint but like proofing and assigning you are not seeing what other users may see on their computers.

                     

                    It is not possible to see the same colors in color managed and non-color managed programs and at the same time simulate how others using different computers may see the colors because different monitors display color values differently. Color managed programs can simulate a common standard color space like sRGB while non-color managed programs can not.

                     

                    Edit: Have in mind all this will work properly if you have a color profile that describes correctly how your monitor displays colors. What you did as described in your post #6 is assign a color space that may be different than the color space of your monitor. The result is when working in sRGB color space your color managed programs will match the non color managed programs on your monitor but that doesn't mean that the actual sRGB space is displayed and any other color space simulation could be based on a wrong monitor profile.