8 Replies Latest reply on Jan 30, 2013 9:12 PM by yudengaz

    How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5

    yudengaz Level 1

      Hello, I am a beginner and wanted to simply copy Chinese characters from MS WOrd to indesign CS 5.5. But it showed up in indesign as a bunch of squares. ANyone knows how to do it right? Thanks

        • 1. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
          [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

          Cange the applied font to one that actually contains Chinese characters.

           

          You'll find a bunch of those fonts grouped together near the bottom of your font list -- look for names such as Mincho, Kozuka, Fansong. If you cannot find any of these, the InDesign installation disk comes with a bunch of free high quality fonts, courtesy of Adobe.

          • 2. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
            Joel Cherney Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            If you cannot find any of these, the InDesign installation disk comes with a bunch of free high quality fonts, courtesy of Adobe.


            Use those.

             

            The chances are quite small that you will offend your Chinese readership by setting text in an overtly Japanese font like Mincho or Kozuka - but the chance is a non-zero chance. All the right glyphs are there, of course (thank you Unihan), but typographic standards differ between the two languages, and there's no sense in taking the risk.

            • 3. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
              yudengaz Level 1

              REALLY appreciated, Jongware

              • 4. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
                [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

                Joel Cherney wrote:

                 

                If you cannot find any of these, the InDesign installation disk comes with a bunch of free high quality fonts, courtesy of Adobe.


                Use those.

                 

                The chances are quite small that you will offend your Chinese readership by setting text in an overtly Japanese font like Mincho or Kozuka - but the chance is a non-zero chance. All the right glyphs are there, of course (thank you Unihan), but typographic standards differ between the two languages, and there's no sense in taking the risk.

                 

                Ah -- apologies! Wait, let me check my ID ... I got

                 

                * Apple LiGothic, Apple LiSung (installed by default on OS X)

                * BiauKai (umm, don't know)

                * Adobe Fan Heiti

                * STHeiti

                * LiHei Pro

                * LiSong Pro

                * Adobe Ming Std

                * Adobe Fangsong Std

                * GB18030Bitmap (exactly what it says: a bitmap font, and you can use it in InDesign! A bad idea...)

                * Hei

                * Heiti SC

                * Adobe Heiti Std

                * Hiragino Sans GB

                * Kai

                * Adobe Kaiti Std

                * Adobe Song Std

                 

                .. and yet even more. If you are working on Windows, you get a couple of "MS Xxx" fonts as well, and in that case you are definitely better off with Adobe's set.

                 

                I must admit I only see the difference because Japanese fonts usually do not include a "full" set of glyphs (at least, not the "usual" 3,000 to 10,000). Joel, care to point out some tell-tale glyph forms?

                • 5. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
                  yudengaz Level 1

                  Thank you for the info.

                  I bought the online version of CS5.5 suitewith just an installation disk no content disk where additional fonts are stored.

                  The choices for font seem adequate. But the font once chosen does not give you the option to make it bold or italic. So, you are forced to select a different font if you want to highlight the titles etc.

                  • 6. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
                    Joel Cherney Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    I must admit I only see the difference because Japanese fonts usually do not include a "full" set of glyphs (at least, not the "usual" 3,000 to 10,000). Joel, care to point out some tell-tale glyph forms?

                     

                    I'm actually already working on an article about this, but in the interim: Wikipedia's summary is pretty decent. It's not like there is a case where any one glyph will alienate your mainland Chinese audience. (So far as I know, anyways.) The "missing" 7000 glyphs are mostly historical and regional variants, but if your translator went to the effort of writing for an overtly Taiwanese or Hong Kong population, for example, it'd be a shame to lose that detail.

                    • 7. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
                      David W. Goodrich Level 3

                      It is almost always better to use a Chinese font for Chinese, especially if you aren't sure what it says.  In that case, and if there is just one source, you just have to assume whoever typed the characters knew what they were doing.  However, if you pull material in from multiple sources, you could end up mixing traditional and simplified characters, an inconsistency that can look quite odd.

                       

                      As for bold and italics, East Asian fonts do not include these, and unlike MS Word, InDesign prefers not to create them artificially—though it will widen or slant characters if you insist.  Some Chinese fonts offer different weights, but not those included with the Mac and Windows operating systems, nor those bundled with InDesign.  However, some of the Japanese fonts bundled with ID do offer several weights which you can use in place of bold for Chinese so long as you avoid characters with distinctly Japanese forms.  If that is what Jongware meant in requesting "tell-tale" examples, I'd pick 戸 rather than 戶 as the classic, either as a character or a radical, but that isn't fail-safe and there are many more.

                       

                      The Chinese Mac site has a handy listing of Chinese fonts included with various versions of Mac and Windows, and links to a page where explaining the differences between the different character sets.  Nowadays, any Chinese font that doesn't offer at least 20,000 characters is likely to be a decorative or special-purpose item.  Supposedly a well-educated Chinese can recognize something like half that number but I wouldn't dismiss ten thousand as rare or unusual—the real oddities are among the 40,000 added with Unicode 3.1's Extension B a dozen years ago.  At that time, the Adobe-Japan1-4 character set included 15,000 characters, growing to 23,000 with version 6 in 2004.

                       

                      David

                      • 8. Re: How to copy Chinese text from MS Word to Indesign CS5.5
                        yudengaz Level 1

                        Thank you David for the insight.