11 Replies Latest reply: Feb 18, 2013 10:31 AM by Ken Nielsen RSS

    How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?

    Ken Nielsen Community Member

      In FCP, you can crop a frame by going to wireframe and simply adjusting it to crop the image area you want to show. I want to maintain 16:9 but simple make the clip 'zoomed in' to an area that I want. It won't be too drastic of a crop. Does Premiere Pro have the ability to do this?

       

      TIA,


      Ken

        • 1. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
          Jeff Bellune ACP

          See if the Scale parameter of the Motion effect does the trick for you.  Every video clip has the Motion effect applied by default, but all the parameters are set so that the source clip remains unchanged until you explicitly modify the parameters.  Adobe calls Motion an "intrinsic" effect, in case you run across that term while searching.  Volume is an intrinsic effect of audio clips (or the audio portion of linked audio/video clips).

           

          Jeff

          • 2. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
            Ken Nielsen Community Member

            I think I see that you are saying that I can go into the effects panel and look for 'scale.'? That makes sense and is probably exactly what I need. Thank You Jeff.

            • 3. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
              Ken Nielsen Community Member

              It looks like the process is faily mechanical, typing in numbers until the right framing and scale is achieved. I take it that there is no 'interactive control at this point, where you could 'move' the image around with a hand to get correct placement. I'm wondering if it might be best to use FCP and Premiere 'hand in hand' to use the features from each that get the job done to an individual's preferred way of working?

              • 4. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                Jeff Bellune ACP

                Two things:

                1. The numbers in the Effect Controls panel are scrubbable hot text.  No need to type anything in most cases.
                2. If you select the word Motion in the Motion effect, you will see a bounding box in the Program Monitor with handles that you can manipulate directly.

                Jeff

                • 5. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                  Jeff Bellune ACP

                  Also, if you really do want to crop the frame, you can select the Crop effect from the Effects panel.  Selecting the word Crop will also enable a bounding box that can be manipulated.

                   

                  Jeff

                  • 6. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                    Ken Nielsen Community Member

                    Wow, Jeff, that information helps tremendously, I can hardly wait to try alll of those things. I'll get to it today but for right now, I'm very encouraged about the abilities of Premiere Pro CS6! Thank You!

                     

                    Ken

                    • 7. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                      Ken Nielsen Community Member

                      I see that, like the beginner that I am, I used the wrong terminology. Crop does indeed crop, but, working in print media for most of my life, what I was looking for was to seclect a portion of the view and 'enlarge it' to fill the frame with some selective positioning of the area to be used. It might be more correctly called 'zooming in' on an area of the original frame, and also filling the frame with that selected area. I hope that this helps give an idea of what I am after.

                       

                      Another way of putting it might be like a car in the distance coming at the camera and then getting close to the camera. With that scene, what I would want to do is start by filling the frame with the car in the distance and keyframe a 'zoom out' effect that would keep the car filling the screen and eventually wind up with the car close to the camera. So the car would be big, filling the frame, all the while it was coming toward the camera. I belive this would be called starting with a full zoom and then 'zooming out' until the car was at the point near the camera.

                       

                      PS: after trying everything again, I see that 'Scale' is indeed the answer to what I wanted. Keeping things centered on the screen is a trick and I've added many keyframes, almost at every frame in one instance, to keep the subject centered on screen. Also, I see that 600% is the maximum scale I can use to start with, so some responsibility must lie in the hands of the videographer and the zoom lens on the camera.

                       

                      Any comments you have to possible help as I flounder with my beginning efforts would be appreciated. I believe control will come if I put the time in now.

                      • 8. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                        Ann Bens ACP/MVPs

                        Keeping things centered, you mean holding the car in the middle of the screen.

                        Might want to try setting the Anchor Point on the middel of the object and keyframing that.

                        • 9. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                          Ken Nielsen Community Member

                          Ann Bens wrote:

                           

                          Keeping things centered, you mean holding the car in the middle of the screen.

                          Might want to try setting the Anchor Point on the middel of the object and keyframing that.

                           

                          Awesome. That should do it.

                           

                          Thanks so much for the great help Ann,

                           

                          Ken

                          • 10. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                            the_wine_snob Community Member

                            Ken,

                             

                            With Scale, what you doing is "effectively cropping" with the Frame Size. The Frame Size is like the aperture in a photographic matte - the aperture stays the same, but if you put a photograph, that is larger behind it, you still only see that aperture, and what shows through it. Think of a matte with an 8 x 10 aperture cut into it. If you place an 8 x 10 photograph behind it, you see the entire photograph. If, however, you enlarge that photograph, to say 11 x 14, it is larger but still only showing the area of the 8 x 10 aperture.

                             

                            Hunt

                            • 11. Re: How do I crop a frame in Premiere Pro CS6?
                              Ken Nielsen Community Member

                              Bill Hunt wrote:

                               

                              Ken,

                               

                              With Scale, what you doing is "effectively cropping" with the Frame Size. The Frame Size is like the aperture in a photographic matte - the aperture stays the same, but if you put a photograph, that is larger behind it, you still only see that aperture, and what shows through it. Think of a matte with an 8 x 10 aperture cut into it. If you place an 8 x 10 photograph behind it, you see the entire photograph. If, however, you enlarge that photograph, to say 11 x 14, it is larger but still only showing the area of the 8 x 10 aperture.

                               

                              Hunt

                               

                               

                              Ah, yes! Enlarging the 'photograph' to 11 x 14 or larger is what I want to do, with viewing through the 8 x 10 aperture - That is the exact concept of what I want to accomplish. Thanks to this discussion I am being led into the areas I want to learn as much as I can about in Premiere Pro.

                               

                              Ken