13 Replies Latest reply: Feb 20, 2013 10:48 AM by whsprague RSS

    Transcoding Question

    tba20042003

      I have downloaded Squared 5 Mpeg Streamclip to transcode the videos I shoot on my Canon 5D MkII; I live in UK and work with Windows 7.

      My question is: can I use Apple ProRes 422 on files which will be edited in Windows, or is there another Codec I should select from the dropdown menu in Streamclip?

      Many thanks,

      Tom

        • 1. Re: Transcoding Question
          VDOSurfer Community Member

          I am not sure how much response you will get for a question that is not related to Premiere Elements in the Premiere Elements forum. I am not also sure about the converter software that you have. What I can tell you though is to try out Premiere Elements 11 (The latest version) and then see for yourself if the format is taken in native within the app. You might not even have to transcode if you want to edit the footages.

           

          I have made too many assumptions (You do not have Premiere Elements, you want to edit videos, you have a good enough PC, you are doing this as a hobby and not as a professional etc.). If you want me to not make any assumptions, you will have to give details on what you want to do with the videos other than of course as you mentioned, transcoding and why you want to do it...

          • 2. Re: Transcoding Question
            tba20042003 Community Member

            Hi,

            Many thanks for your reply - I'm sorry that I didn't give enough information, so will try to correct that.

            I do have Adobe Premiere Elements 11, and that is what I will be using to edit the footage on.

            The final video will be a HD DVD for sale and distribution - it is an instructional DVD about pike fishing, and will be sold to members of a national angling association. There is also a plan to upload parts of the DVD onto YouTube and Vimeo.

            I hope this gives you more information - I have downloaded MPEG Streamclip, and as I said, I have got Premiere Elements 11.

            Any further help and assistance you could give me would be very much appreciated.

            Thank you.

            Regards.

            Tom

            • 3. Re: Transcoding Question
              Dave__J__E Community Member

              Tom I'm not sure why you would want to transcode the videos from your 5D before editing in PRE11. You can load the clips straight into PRE11. Choose the Project Settings Preset to suit - one of the DSLR presets, either NTSC or PAL, depending on your frame rate. I assume this is full HD footage ?

               

              When you've finished editing, Share the video by choosing an appropriate encoding option. I'm not quite sure what you mean by a HD DVD either. As far as I'm aware, DVD's can only be standard definition. To get HD you need to go to either AVCHD disk or Bluray.

               

              Cheers Dave

              • 4. Re: Transcoding Question
                VDOSurfer Community Member

                Tom,

                As Dave mention, you can bring in the clips straight into PRE11 and actually not even worry about the project selection. the app does the switch for you. If your machine configuration is good enough, you should not have any issues editing the clip from a DSLR.

                 

                Dave,

                Premiere Elements can burn HD to DVD. The feature came in PrE10, I think. It is an option within Share -> Disc -> AVCHD.

                • 5. Re: Transcoding Question
                  Dave__J__E Community Member

                  Yes that's what I mean't by an AVCHD disk. It's not a DVD video but is on a DVD disk, if that makes sense !

                   

                  Dave

                  • 6. Re: Transcoding Question
                    VDOSurfer Community Member

                    Oh, yeah. You need a DVD burner to burn the content but a Blu-Ray Player to play it on the TV. Daft.

                    • 7. Re: Transcoding Question
                      Dave__J__E Community Member

                      Yes that's what I was on about.

                      Dave

                      • 8. Re: Transcoding Question
                        tba20042003 Community Member

                        That's brilliant guys - thank you so much for your help and advice.

                        I did mean just a DVD which will play on a domestic DVD player - not sure where the HD came from!

                        Thanks again - much appreciated.

                        Regards.

                        Tom

                        • 9. Re: Transcoding Question
                          the_wine_snob CommunityMVP

                          For a DVD-Video, which will be SD (Standard Def), I would consider a workflow like this:

                           

                          Import (your 5D MKII footage should Import and edit just fine, if your CPU is up to the task) your 5D footage, into a matching Project Preset, and edit that HD footage completely. Then from that HD Project, Export/Share/Publish to DV-AVI (or DV-MOV if on a Mac), letting PrE down-rez that HD footage for you. Then, Import that output file into a new DV (SD Widescreen 16:9) Project, set your Menu Marker and Chapter Markers, then Share/Publish to either Disc, or to Folder. This will do the necessary Transcoding to MPEG-2 DVD, which is required, and result in either a DVD-Video disc, or a folder with the necessary VIDEO_TS folder and the necessary IFO, BUP and VOB files inside it. The folder option will also allow you to test that VIDEO_TS folder in a DVD software player on the computer, and then you can use a burning utiltiy, like the free ImgBurn to do the physical burn. As you are going to be doing commercially released DVD-Videos, if you DO Burn to Disc, I would first get a pack of high-quality DVD-RW discs (a 5-pack will last a very long time), and do a "test" to the RW. Then, take that test disc to several different set-top players (I have six different ones, from a bargain-basement cheapie to an esoteric ultra-high-end BD deck), to make sure that it plays perfectly. That means that you will not end up with "coasters," if the disc still needs work. Then, when all testing is complete, Burn to Disc with the highest-quality blank media possible, such as Falcon Pro, Verbatim or Taiyo-Yuden. I use that RW method (do NOT deliver on RW media - it is ONLY for testing), after the Burn to Folder testing, and before I output the final DVD-Video. A lot of testing, yes, but with over 2000 discs delivered, I have never had one returned.

                           

                          Good luck,

                           

                          Hunt

                          • 10. Re: Transcoding Question
                            whsprague Community Member

                            Bill Hunt wrote:

                             

                            For a DVD-Video, which will be SD (Standard Def), I would consider a workflow like this:

                             

                            1.  Import (your 5D MKII footage should Import and edit just fine, if your CPU is up to the task) your 5D footage, into a matching Project Preset, and edit that HD footage completely.

                             

                            2.  Then from that HD Project, Export/Share/Publish to DV-AVI (or DV-MOV if on a Mac), letting PrE down-rez that HD footage for you.

                             

                            3.  Then, Import that output file into a new DV (SD Widescreen 16:9) Project, set your Menu Marker and Chapter Markers, then Share/Publish to either Disc, or to Folder. This will do the necessary Transcoding.....

                            Bill,

                             

                            I edited your post so that I can more clearly ask a question.

                             

                            The PrE11 that I have allows burning directly to DVD from an HD project.  Why do you do steps 2 and 3 when PrE11 lets you "Share" directly to a DVD.

                             

                            Thanks in advance.

                             

                            Bill S

                            • 11. Re: Transcoding Question
                              the_wine_snob CommunityMVP

                              Bill,

                               

                              Some feel that going through the Encoding step to DV-AVI still yields better quality, than doing the down-rezzing internally, during the authoring process. I will have to conduct some controlled experiments to see if I agree with that assertion. If you have such a Project handy, you might try it both ways, and report on your findings. I will soon be doing the same.

                               

                              Thanks,

                               

                              Hunt

                              • 12. Re: Transcoding Question
                                tba20042003 Community Member

                                Thank you Bill - very much appreciated help and advice.

                                Cheers.

                                Tom

                                • 13. Re: Transcoding Question
                                  whsprague Community Member

                                  Bill Hunt wrote:

                                   

                                  Bill,

                                   

                                  Some feel that going through the Encoding step to DV-AVI still yields better quality, than doing the down-rezzing internally, during the authoring process. I will have to conduct some controlled experiments to see if I agree with that assertion. If you have such a Project handy, you might try it both ways, and report on your findings. I will soon be doing the same.

                                   

                                  Thanks,

                                   

                                  Hunt

                                  I'm at the end of a monster.  I was asked to do a video of an elder speaking at a family reunion.  She talked for four hours and I had my granddaughters using two cameras.  Argh!

                                   

                                  My short experience with video has been short projects, primarily on Vimeo or as computer files on a pesonal media player.  DVDs and Blu-Rays are a new experience.

                                   

                                  Details:

                                  -Shot on a Sony and a Panasonic AVCHD cameras at 1080i60.

                                  -There is a commitment to family members to provide "disks". 

                                  -The computer is an ASUS  i7 laptop, with SSD, BD burner and Nvidia card.

                                  -The entire project and scratch disks are in a single folder dedicated to the project.

                                  -The play back test is on a Samsung 32" TV and Samsung BD player

                                   

                                  The Goal:

                                  -To produce multiple double jewel cases with both DVD and Blu-Ray for my wife to give to her relatives, depending on interest levels!

                                   

                                  After months of off and on editing, including a major computer failure caused by me, I have a project with 70 minutes on the timeline.  There is one audio track and two video tracks.  Video 2 has some short clips and .jpgs that "cover" the speaker on the primary video track with the goal of providing a higher interest level at viewing. 

                                   

                                  Yesterday was the time to start makeing the disks.

                                   

                                  The Blu-Ray was first and easy to do.  It took about 80 minutes.  Rendering was only about 30minutes and burning took longer.  I'm surprised and pleased that output rendering is so fast.

                                   

                                  Next was to try Hunt's two ways to make a DVD. 

                                   

                                  The first way is to create an intermediate DV-AVI, put it in a new project, add menu markers and burn a DVD from there.  The rendering to DV-AVI took about 30 minutes.  Recreating the menu markers took a few minutes.  Sharing the new project to DVD took about 70 minutes, with writing to the DVD being the biggest part of it.

                                   

                                  Last was making a DVD from the original master project.  The steps are the same as making the Blu-Ray, except that DVD is selected.  Menu markers do not have to be recreated.  The rendering and burning process was also about 70 minutes, again with the writing to DVD taking the longest.

                                   

                                  The Results:

                                  Of course the BD is the best.  From normal viewing distance I could not percieve a quality difference between the two DVDs and both are acceptable for distribution as gifts.  In fact, I am a little surprised at how good the DVDs are!  It may partially be the "upscaling" done by the BD player.

                                   

                                  Some of the "blood kin" relativives will be pleased regardless of the disk player they own.  I feel sorry for their spouses.  Unfortunately most of the relatives were at the reunion and knew how long their elder aunt talked.  It took a lot to get 4 hours down to 70 minutes!

                                   

                                  So, specifically to Bill Hunts suggestion that I try it both ways, I don't see an advantage to go through an intermediate DV-AVI step with PrE11.  I does not seem necessary nor does it seem to provide picture quality improvement to my 66 year old eyes.

                                   

                                  I will try to never do a 70 minute video again!  However, I learned more about editing than I thought possible.  Maybe it was worth it --- but just once.

                                   

                                  Bill S