4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 25, 2013 1:24 PM by Vik_R

    Is This a Good Font Combination for Use in a Novel?

    Vik_R Level 1

      I've moved my novel (description here) from Word to InDesign. Based on discussions in this forum, I've become inspired to look at fonts seeking a suitable font combination for it. 

       

      For body text, I'm considering Feijoa.

       

      Screen Shot 2013-03-25 at 3.09.07 AM.png

       

      For chapter titles, I'm considering Giorgio Sans.

       

      Screen Shot 2013-03-25 at 3.09.33 AM.png

       

      Too crazy? Suitable/unsuitable for use in a novel?

       

      Those links in the Feijoa sample between the "st", "ct", "ch", "st", etc. -- is it possible to turn those off in InDesign? (I'm very new to InDesign.)

       

      Thanks in advance to all for any thoughts!

        • 1. Re: Is This a Good Font Combination for Use in a Novel?
          Eugene Tyson Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          It wouldn't tickle my fancy - but if you like it and it suits the mood of the project, then go for it.

           

          Perhaps try 3 or 4 different combinations for 1 or 2 chapters and look at them all at the same time to see what looks best.

           

          Have you ever read up on typography and pairing fonts - it's interesting and well worth a read

           

          Here's one article that gives 4 different ways to pair fonts http://www.typography.com/email/2010_03/index_tw.htm

           

           

          It's mostly an aesthetic personal thing - but take a look and choose wisely - I wouldn't continue without trying at least 4 combinations of different fonts.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Is This a Good Font Combination for Use in a Novel?
            [Jongware] Most Valuable Participant

            Vik_R wrote:

             

            Those links in the Feijoa sample between the "st", "ct", "ch", "st", etc. -- is it possible to turn those off in InDesign? (I'm very new to InDesign.)

             

            The name for this typical character pairs is "discretionary ligatures"; ligatures that are so typical, they do not fall under "common" ligatures. Indeed, usually one would not want these special ligatures in regular running text.

             

            By default, Common Ligatures *are* enabled in InDesign but Discretionary Ligatures (in the OpenType section in Character settings) are *not*. However: It Depends On The Font Designer. If the font designer decided these ligatures should be *enabled* by default, there is very little you can do about it. (Perhaps only with something as drastic as switching *all* ligatures off -- and even then I can think of ways to force them upon a hapless user!)

             

            Usually the description of a font contains information on which OpenType features are included (both Common and Discretionary Ligatures are 'OpenType features'), but I could not find anything like that on the Feoija site. Somebody who actually owns the font has to check this for you.

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            • 3. Re: Is This a Good Font Combination for Use in a Novel?
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              Vik_R wrote:

               

              Those links in the Feijoa sample between the "st", "ct", "ch", "st", etc. -- is it possible to turn those off in InDesign?

              Yes. Those are discretionary ligatures and are enabled by default, but can be turned off (you should find that under OpenType in the Character panel menu), but that might also turn off the ff, fi, and fl ligatures, which may not look good.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Is This a Good Font Combination for Use in a Novel?
                Vik_R Level 1

                Thanks very much for the info and feedback!