6 Replies Latest reply on Apr 9, 2013 2:08 PM by jstrawn

    Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?

    TheCoroner9 Level 1

      I have a project shot in DV that I need to archive in case I have to do a new edit of the program in a couple of years.

       

      Each camera master is saved as basically a 1 hour avi file but that averages out to 13 GB per file. Too large to archive onto a single DVD. I could go to bluray but would prefer to stay on DVD if possible.

       

      What type of file should I be encoding to in PP (CS6) to  get the smallest size file, that I can edit later on in PP if necessary, but still retain the quality of the original camera master tape - so I never have to touch the camera tapes again?

        • 1. Re: Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?
          joe bloe premiere Level 5
          ...retain the quality of the original camera master tape

          To do that, you need to archive your DV files as captured...

          any other format or codec will result in either a larger file or compromised quality.

           

          The best option for archive is either Blu-ray or an external drive.

          If you have to archive to DVD, you can used a spanned archive

          across multiple disks.

          I have done this with WinRar in the ancient past.

          • 2. Re: Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?
            jstrawn Adobe Employee

            What Joe said is correct. There are also a few other options. Most of them are older methods now, but it you're working in DV, they shoudl work fine for you:

            1. Export to Tape - just export the final project (timeline) out to tape on a dv device

            2. EDL + Batch List - EDL (Edit Decision List) will record all you edits and have a batch capture log will record what you captured off tape. Just save the orginal tape (or duplicate copies) and re-catpure your media using  Batch Capture.

            3. Project trimmer (my preference) - Make a new trimmed copy of your project which should be MUCH smaller in size because it only containse the media you see/hear in the finished project (plus handles, as set by you)

            4. A giant hard drive --> move & copy - what are they up to now, like 4tb for $180??? Crazy... of course you'll need to backup that hard drive and maybe back that one up too if it's particularly precious so it will still get expensive. And then of course it could all go obsolete in ten years anyways...

            5. Adobe Anywhere http://www.adobe.com/products/adobeanywhere.html - Great for pros that can build the cost into thir prodcution workflow. Maybe not so good for indies. Not quite publocly release yet anyways. And then of course there are many other online-storage solutions that could work for you if you don't mind paying & the upload/download time.

             

            To echo joe, archiving solely to dvd/bluray or any other disposable media would be my LAST choice. And definitely don't re-export or otherwise transcode you footage into another compressed format before sotoring it, because it will suffer generational loss.

             

            Archiving (especially for video) is a huge can of worms and becomes an increasingly larger conundrum the higher-end your work is. There is no one seamless solution yet, so you may want to explore more than one of the options mentioned in this thread (and maybe some others that we didn't)

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?
              TheCoroner9 Level 1

              Thanks - Looks like I'll archive the original files to Bluray then and also to a 4tb external drive for backup.

              • 4. Re: Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?
                Jim_Simon Level 8

                Your best option here is just to put the original tapes on a shelf.  Never reuse a DV tape.

                • 5. Re: Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?
                  joe bloe premiere Level 5

                  Jim's advice is the best yet.

                  I have assumed you would not have future access to the original tape.

                  • 6. Re: Encoding DV footage to smaller file file for archiving?
                    jstrawn Adobe Employee

                    Your best option here is just to put the original tapes on a shelf.  Never reuse a DV tape.

                    Indeed. That's what I really meant with my second option above. I was just writing too fast and it's been too long since I did an all dv workflow. I would edit it now but the site won't let me.

                     

                    If you save the original project, sans media, then you won't need an EDL and you can just re-capture from the original tape(s) in whatever way you captured the first time. This really is the DV-archiving best-practice. I would assert that it doesn't necessarily need to be your primary backup method anymore, because hd space is so cheap now, and it's easier to just copy everything over and work from that drive if/when needed. (and I didn't literally mean that you needed a full 4tb of external drive space, just that you cen get them that large for under $200 now, which is insanely cheap compared to just a few years ago) But still, as long as you are not re-using your tapes, which you should NOT be, and you save your project file, which is tiny comapred to the media, that method will serve as a really reliable auxilliary backup in case your drive ever fails. Just make sure to save your project file in more than one place and keep the tapes safe and well labeled. That's something you should be doing regardless of what your primary method is.