8 Replies Latest reply on Apr 16, 2013 2:03 AM by Harm Millaard

    Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor

    justincboyer

      Hi there,

       

      So I was attempting to use Premiere Pro CS6 to edit my AVCHD .MTS files. However my AMD Dual-Core Processor E300 couldn't handle the files, resulting in "choppy" playback. I was wondering if my processor would better handle HD files if I converted them to another file type, any ideas or suggestions? And what converter could I use to keep the 1920x1080 HD quality? I can't upgrade my processor, I've tried

       

      I appreciate all suggestions.

        • 1. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          That CPU is slower than molasses in winter, it scores a lousy 630 in the Passmark CPU test, where a decent CPU would score over 16,000.

           

          Forget it. No way this is going to work, it is way too slow and underpowered. Get a new PC. This one will even triple over DV material , let alone AVCHD material. It is like asking your granny to haul a 20 ton load up a steep hill, using her 50 year old bicycle. It can't be done.

          • 2. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
            acm-josh

            Millaard is right. Get an i7. Lots of power!

            • 3. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
              justincboyer Level 1

              OK, thanks. Obviously I would get a new computer if I could. I hate when people suggest that. I'm sorry I'm not rich. I'm just deseperate to create, and I have to work with what I've got, you know? We're not all so lucky. But thanks for the information, I'll trying something else.....

              • 4. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
                John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Convert AVCHD to HDV http://forums.adobe.com/thread/390605 - note that the message is in the Premiere Elements FAQ area, but the conversion software links provided in the message have nothing to do with any specific version of Premiere

                • 5. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
                  Rallymax-forum Level 3

                  John T Smith wrote:

                   

                  Convert AVCHD to HDV http://forums.adobe.com/thread/390605 - note that the message is in the Premiere Elements FAQ area, but the conversion software links provided in the message have nothing to do with any specific version of Premiere

                  Yup. I'd transcode all your source footage to an easier video format and continue on the same pc.

                  HDV or DNxHD or Ut would all be good options given the cpu performance available to you.

                   

                  Also, if you have an nVidia graphics card I highly recommend you enable that (google for "nvidia card mercury playback engine support" or something like that on how to modify the text file to turn it on). It will help offload some of the work your cpu is currently trying to do.

                  • 6. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
                    Rallymax-forum Level 3

                    Harm Millaard wrote:

                     

                    That CPU is slower than molasses in winter, it scores a lousy 630 in the Passmark CPU test, where a decent CPU would score over 16,000.

                     

                    Forget it. No way this is going to work, it is way too slow and underpowered. Get a new PC. This one will even triple over DV material , let alone AVCHD material. It is like asking your granny to haul a 20 ton load up a steep hill, using her 50 year old bicycle. It can't be done.

                    That's a little hash isn't it? I used to edit DV on a 100MHz 486 so I'm pretty sure a dual core can edit HDV or other wavelet compression systems (like DNxHD, Ut).

                     

                    Yes, an AME Dual Core won't do AVCHD native editing but there no reason why she can't make digital intermediates up front.

                    • 7. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
                      RjL190365 Level 4

                      I'm afraid Harm is correct on this one. Today's editing software is much, much more demanding on resources (CPU and sometimes GPU power, RAM and disk requirements) than very old editing programs used with such ancient 486's. (And not only that, but Premiere Pro CS6 will not run at all on that 486 since CS6 requires a 64-bit system to even run at all, and the 486 was only a 32-bit CPU to begin with - and then, 486-based systems typically ran only 16-bit software.) And since Adobe's absolute minimum CPU requirement calls for a 2.0GHz or faster Intel Core 2 Duo CPU, that AMD E300 falls well below Adobe's minimum CPU speed requirements since it runs at only 1.3GHz, and is also further handicapped by its lack of complete support for the SSE 4.1 instruction set that Adobe makes extensive use of. No amount of tinkering can ever get that E300 netbook up to speed. And that's not to mention that netbooks completely lack high-speed connections to external devices (at most they have only USB 2.0 ports, which are themselves too slow to handle the extremely high data rates required of lesser-compressed intermediate files - HD intermediates require data rates of at least 100 MB/s, but the E300 netbooks are only capable of 35 MB/s external data transfers through their only type of port, USB 2.0).

                       

                      I'm afraid that the OP has run into the very harsh reality of HD video: There is not a single codec that is easy on both the CPU and the disk I/O system. Everything that's HD requires either a lot of CPU processing power and/or a very fast disk I/O system. There is absolutely no way at all whatsoever around this fact.

                      • 8. Re: Premiere Pro with a dual-core processor
                        Harm Millaard Level 7

                        Look for instance at the Intel Core2 Quad Q9550 @ 2.83 GHz. It has a CPU Passmark rating of 4,053, more than 6 times faster than the AMD E300. Now also look at this discussion: http://forums.adobe.com/message/5238734?tstart=0#5238734