17 Replies Latest reply on May 31, 2014 7:13 PM by Teknon

    Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6

    Goucax

      Hello, actually trying to help a friend of mine who's thinking of switching from Final Cut Pro to Windows environment and Premiere Pro CS6. He has a three-year-old laptop with an Intel i5 CPU & 8 Gb of DDR3-1067 RAM. I have quite a new of a rig, mainly built for entertainment, yet the capability of this allows a decent time of rendering as far as I know. I'm trying to impress him with the rendering times of whose he usually spends days with. Some questions:

       

      1) Does Premiere Pro CS6 trial have some sort of limitations to the hardware settings? I couldn't find as many settings, as for CPU for example, as I did in the full version of Adobe After Effects.

       

      2) What sort of settings should I use with my rig to optimize rendering speeds? Would be rendering atleast 1920x1080 stuff with the length of over two hours in total. Is my GPU supported by default (CUDA)?

       

      My PC's components and software

       

      * Windows 8 Pro x64

      * Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 (trial)

      * Intel i7-3770k @ 3,9 GHz turbo

      * 16 Gb of DDR3-1600 MHz

      * 2(Samsung 830 SSD 128 Gb) in RAID0 (700 Mb/s write)

      * Samsung Spinpoint F3 1 Tb media-HDD (130 Mb/s write)

      * NVIDIA GTX680

       

       

      Thanks in advance,

      Otto

        • 1. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
          RjL190365 Level 4

          Otto,

           

          The trial version has so many of its features disabled - and they get unlocked only if you activate the software, which requires paying the full purchase price of the software.

           

          And once you activate the software, you'll find that with your GTX 680 the Premiere Pro MPE has defaulted to the software-only mode until you update the program to version 6.0.3. (The trial version is still at version 6.0.0, IIRC.)

           

          Next, that GTX 680 is overkill with that CPU unless you plan to heavily overclock the CPU to something beyond its realistic maximum that's possible with conventional air cooling. And with that, you do not have enough conventional hard disks (only one total) for optimal performance. The result is that you have a quite unbalanced configuration that will never be as fast as a system with the same CPU but with better component balance (a GTX 660 Ti instead of a GTX 680, three or more secondary hard disks instead of the single disk to go along with the OS disk, 32GB of RAM instead of just 16GB). Remember, GPU acceleration only benefits certain render operations while additional disks and RAM will benefit Premiere Pro performance on a more global scale.

           

          So in other words, you have pretty much wasted your money on the high-end GPU when you should have spent some of it towards additional hard disks and more RAM. Also, search the forums for "CUDA hack" if you're going to use a GPU that is not officially certified.

           

          Randall

          • 2. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Welcome to the forums!

             

            I like your non-video editing configuration it is very similar to a configuration that I have tested extensivly and do use for Premiere.

            Goucax wrote:

             

            Hello, actually trying to help a friend of mine who's thinking of switching from Final Cut Pro to Windows environment and Premiere Pro CS6. He has a three-year-old laptop with an Intel i5 CPU & 8 Gb of DDR3-1067 RAM. I have quite a new of a rig, mainly built for entertainment, yet the capability of this allows a decent time of rendering as far as I know. I'm trying to impress him with the rendering times of whose he usually spends days with. Some questions:

             

            1) Does Premiere Pro CS6 trial have some sort of limitations to the hardware settings? I couldn't find as many settings, as for CPU for example, as I did in the full version of Adobe After Effects.

             

            2) What sort of settings should I use with my rig to optimize rendering speeds? Would be rendering atleast 1920x1080 stuff with the length of over two hours in total. Is my GPU supported by default (CUDA)?

             

            I think CS6 is now a full version, but if they do not allow you to upgrade then you will have to add your GTX 680 GPU card to the list in the "cuda_supported_cards.txt" file for the ability to have GPU accelerated MPE..  You might be interested in our new benchmark PPBM6 (but you do have to register to use this one.  If you do not want to register you could go to PPBM5 and use that benchmark to run on both your systems and then you will be able to compare your setup to 1200+ tested results.

             

            When you say above "rendering speeds" are you referring to rendering the timeline for viewing or are you reffering to exporting a encoded output file?

             

            P.S. Your friend's laptop I am assuming only has one disk drive and that is bad for Premiere absolute minimum is two drives.  Also an external drive connected with a USB2 connection is useless.  Does it have an eSATA connection?

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
              Goucax Level 1

              Thanks for a complete reply. You just slightly missed my point; my system is completely built for entertainment and gaming, I simply came across the fact that an i7 with HT works well for rendering, and Premiere Pro benefits from the CUDA of my GPU. Overclocking my CPU would indeed be possible; I have an extreme-level AsRock Z77-MB and the best possible aftermarket cooler, being the Phanteks PH-TC14PE. 

               

              I'll try to run the benchmark as Bill mentioned to compare my system to the ones already listed and will come back afterwards, thanks again!

              • 4. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                RjL190365 Level 4

                In that case, you still need more hard disks for optimal video editing performance. One disk plus the OS disk just aren't enough these days.

                 

                By the way, a three-year-old laptop that uses an i5 will be s-l-o-w by current standards, especially for video editing: The CPU will certainly be a first-generation (Arrandale) i5, which is less efficient (in terms of performance per clock) than current (third-generation) Ivy Bridge i5s. Worse, all mobile i5 CPUs have only two physical cores (albeit with hyper threading) - and no dual-core CPU (not even a desktop one) performs as fast in video editing chores as even a mediocre-performance quad-core CPU. And as Bill stated, that friend of yours might have a laptop that has only USB 2.0 (and no other higher-speed outputs or interfaces) for external disk connections, and might not be able to accomodate more than a single internal disk (in most lower-end laptops, the optical drive is permanently mounted and is nonremovable).

                • 5. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                  Goucax Level 1

                  What do you mean with "you still need more hard disks..." ?

                  Should I be running multiple HDDs / SSDs in RAID, or is there a setting to divide the load to different HDs at once?

                  • 6. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                    RjL190365 Level 4

                    Goucax wrote:

                     

                    What do you mean with "you still need more hard disks..." ?

                    Should I be running multiple HDDs / SSDs in RAID, or is there a setting to divide the load to different HDs at once?

                    What I meant is that by the looks of the list of components in your sysem, you do not appear to have enough physical disks in your system. A RAID 0 array of multiple SSDs count as only one disk, as far as we're concerned. You need to purchase additional hard drives since you have only one to supplement your SSDs.

                    • 7. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                      Goucax Level 1

                      So will I be lacking space or performance?

                       

                      Right now the performance looks as follows:

                       

                      -----------------------------------------------------------------------

                      CrystalDiskMark 3.0.2 Shizuku Edition x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo

                                                 Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/

                      -----------------------------------------------------------------------

                      * MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

                       

                       

                                 Sequential Read :   497.132 MB/s

                                Sequential Write :   648.871 MB/s

                               Random Read 512KB :   420.897 MB/s

                              Random Write 512KB :   263.556 MB/s

                          Random Read 4KB (QD=1) :    18.504 MB/s [  4517.5 IOPS]

                         Random Write 4KB (QD=1) :    46.038 MB/s [ 11239.7 IOPS]

                         Random Read 4KB (QD=32) :   455.159 MB/s [111122.8 IOPS]

                        Random Write 4KB (QD=32) :   136.240 MB/s [ 33261.8 IOPS]

                       

                       

                        Test : 4000 MB [C: 36.2% (86.1/238.1 GB)] (x3)

                        Date : 2013/04/25 17:24:15

                          OS : Windows 8 Professional [6.2 Build 9200] (x64)

                       

                      -----------------------------------------------------------------------

                      CrystalDiskMark 3.0.2 Shizuku Edition x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo

                                                 Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/

                      -----------------------------------------------------------------------

                      * MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

                       

                       

                                 Sequential Read :   124.775 MB/s

                                Sequential Write :   121.662 MB/s

                               Random Read 512KB :    32.768 MB/s

                              Random Write 512KB :    48.874 MB/s

                          Random Read 4KB (QD=1) :     0.343 MB/s [    83.8 IOPS]

                         Random Write 4KB (QD=1) :     0.850 MB/s [   207.6 IOPS]

                         Random Read 4KB (QD=32) :     0.748 MB/s [   182.6 IOPS]

                        Random Write 4KB (QD=32) :     0.840 MB/s [   205.1 IOPS]

                       

                       

                        Test : 4000 MB [D: 28.9% (268.8/931.4 GB)] (x3)

                        Date : 2013/04/25 17:40:36

                          OS : Windows 8 Professional [6.2 Build 9200] (x64)

                      • 8. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                        RjL190365 Level 4

                        You'd be lacking in performance, in this case. You see, SATA cannot handle simultaneous reads and writes to begin with. The interface only allows data transfers in one direction at a time. Also, since an SSD is really not recommended for data that is frequently changed or deleted and rewritten, this would make you fall back to the single hard drive for absolutely everything outside of the OS and programs. And it is that single hard drive that would be the biggest bottleneck in your system.

                        1 person found this helpful
                        • 9. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                          Goucax Level 1

                          I have one more 3,5" SATA-drive available, the WD Caviar Green 1 TB. The read/write speeds of that disk appear to be much slower than the corresponding ones in my Spinpoint F3. Would you recommend me to apply the disks into a RAID0 system, or run them individually and assign tracks to each at a time?

                          • 10. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                            RjL190365 Level 4

                            In this case, run them individually. (RAID 0 will not work properly if the two disks are of different speeds.) Also, the WD Green should really only be used for backups to begin with because those drives spin themselves down to a complete halt after they are idled for a certain number of minutes (and this behavior cannot be changed at all in those Green disks) - and then, they take much too long to spin themselves back to speed. You really need additional 7200 RPM hard disks (no Green disks!).

                             

                            Also, it is a BAD idea to run your SSDs in RAID 0 to begin with! You see, the current version of Intel's Rapid Storage Technology drivers do not support TRIM in RAIDed SSDs. As a result, the wear leveling feature that's built into your SSDs is disabled once you put the SSDs in RAID 0, which means that your SSDs could fail much, much sooner than expected.

                            • 11. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                              Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                              Randall,

                               

                              Otto is not interested in using Premiere, he is only running the trial version as a favor for his friend and it sounds to me like he will not be going the "paid" version.  So a "two" disk system is perfectly fine.

                               

                              Otto,

                               

                              Take a look at PPBM5 results #124 BillG Ivy Bridge.  It has my i7-3770K scores.  Note, I was running CS5.5 and your CS6 scores will be somewhat higher and I did have a disk.array of four 1 TB drives in RAID 0, so your system the Disk I/O score will be much, much higher.

                              1 person found this helpful
                              • 12. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                                RjL190365 Level 4

                                Bill Gehrke wrote:

                                 

                                Randall,

                                 

                                Otto is not interested in using Premiere, he is only running the trial version as a favor for his friend and it sounds to me like he will not be going the "paid" version.  So a "two" disk system is perfectly fine.

                                In this case, then, the trial version is only valid for 30 days after first install. After that time, one must activate (pay) just to continue using it at all. (And no, one cannot circumvent this at all by uninstalling and reinstalling the trial. There is only one trial key - and that key is permanently embedded in the system's registry, making the only way to circumvent this a complete wipe and reinstall of the OS and programs.)

                                1 person found this helpful
                                • 13. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                                  Goucax Level 1

                                  That's right, I won't be exceeding the trialship on this one, but I will be providing my friend some details for her to be able to compare Premiere+PC to her current system. I found another disk, a 2010 Hitachi 1TB HDD with 117/110 speeds (7.2k RPM, no power saves), would you recommend going for RAID0 with the Spinpoint, as the speeds are +-10%, or keep it in 2 individual drives for tracks?

                                  • 14. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                                    Harm Millaard Level 7

                                    Only create raid arrays with identical drives, unless you opt for a JBOD slow configuration.

                                    • 15. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                                      Teknon

                                      I'm a newby, so please be gentle! The problem with using a single disk may be head contention -- the read-write heads have to move to one part of the drive to read the source data, then move somewhere else to write the result, then back and forth, continually.  Since head movement is a mechanical process, it's extremely slow compared to RAM, CPU speeds. Modern drives have various optimisations to minimise head contention, but it's still a problem.  Of course, this would only be a bottleneck if the CPU and GPU can render too fast for the drive to keep up. Spreading the load across multiple spindles has been a well-known performance tweak in large corporate database systems for decades.

                                       

                                      For video rendering, it's best to read your sources from one (or more) physical drives, and write the output to another.  As commented above, SATA can't read and write at the same time, so make sure the drives are on separate controllers, so your input and output don't have to compete for the same HDD controller.

                                      • 16. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                                        Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                        Peirasmos

                                         

                                        Did you realize you are replying to an over 1-year old (dead) thread?

                                        • 17. Re: Optimizing hardware for Premiere Pro CS6
                                          Teknon Level 1

                                          Hi Bill,

                                           

                                          Thanks for letting me know.